Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
government masthead
Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Sharon Jarvis

Affiliated Faculty, Adjuncts and Lecturers

Affiliated Faculty

GOV 370L • Political Communication

39005 • Fall 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm CLA 0.128
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Political Communication

39365 • Spring 2014
Meets M 200pm-500pm ART 1.120
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Political Communication

39320 • Fall 2013
Meets T 330pm-630pm BMC 1.202
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Political Communication

38845 • Fall 2012
Meets W 400pm-700pm BMC 1.202
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Political Communication

38860 • Spring 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm UTC 4.112
show description

DESCRIPTION:

Welcome to Political Communication, a course that examines the theory and practice of political communication in the United States. A democracy has always depended on open and direct communication between its citizens and those who govern them. In the United States, this has been true since Colonial times. But with innovations in communication technologies, the range, depth, and importance of communication practices have changed in revolutionary ways. Our primary goal in this class is to ask whether or not democracy is made better or worse, helped or hurt, by contemporary communication practices and technologies.

This course is one of several in the CMS “Political Communication” track (and there are no pre-requisites required to take it). The course is divided into three parts and has three learning objectives. Section One will cover “How Political Language Connects with Audiences” and students will identify and compose compelling political phrases and persuasive political speeches. Section Two will cover “How Mediating Leadership Changes It” and students will describe how audiences react to mediated leadership. Section Three will cover “How to Apply Message Principles in Campaign Settings” and students will employ strategies to promote political and personal causes.

TEXTBOOKS:

Book: Hart, Roderick  P. (1999). Seducing America: How television charms the modern voter (Revised ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA:  Sage. (ISBN:  0-761-91624-5).

Reading packet:  Our reading packet includes selections from: (1) Lehrman, Robert. (2010). The political speechwriter’s companion. Washington D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Press. (2) Luntz, Frank. (2007). Words that work: It’s not what you say, it’s what people hear. New York: Hyperion. (3) Carville, James & Begala, Paul. (2003). Buck up, suck up . . . and come back when you foul up: 12 winning secrets from the war room. New York: Simon & Schuster. (4) Wallack, Lawrence, Woodruff, Katie, Dorfman, Elizabeth, & Diaz, Iris. (1999). News for a change: An advocate’s guide to working with the media Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. (5) Matthews, Christopher. (2009). The hardball handbook: How to win at life. New York: Random House. (ISBN: 978-0-8129-7597-0).

GRADING SYSTEM:

There are 300 points possible in this course. Students can complete three 100 point exams (a combination of short-answer and essay questions) and/or one optional 100 point research paper. If students complete all four assignments, we are happy to drop the lowest grade.

PREREQUISITES/RULES:

Upper-division standing required.  Limited enrollment for non-majors.

GOV 370L • Political Communication

38865 • Fall 2011
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 224
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Political Communication

39080 • Spring 2011
Meets M 300pm-600pm UTC 4.112
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Political Communication

38990 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1200-100pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as CMS 342K )
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Political Communication

39320 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 BUR 208
(also listed as CMS 342K )
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Political Communication

38460 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as CMS 342K )
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

bottom border