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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Stephanie Holmsten

Affiliated Faculty, Adjuncts and Lecturers PhD, Political Science, University of Texas

Affiliated Lecturer
Stephanie Holmsten

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Biography

Dr. Stephanie Holmsten serves as lecturer in the International Relations and Global Studies (IRG) program. Her research focuses on the election of women and ethnic minorities around the world and explores whether institutions that promote the election of ethnic minorities increase or dampen the election of women. Her work with Rob Moser on the election of women to ethnic parties is published in Comparative Political Studies.

Her teaching interests include international relations, international political economy and culture. She is also interested in democratization, gender and politics, race and ethnicity, and electoral institutions. 

Before graduate school, she worked for six years at Bread for the World in Washington, DC, where she traveled throughout the country working with college students and faculty members to support political advocacy initiatives. 

Interests

comparative politics, democratization, electoral institutions, race and gender, international organizations

IRG 320F • Foundatn Intl Rels/Global Stds

40245 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 105
show description

IRG 320F: Foundations in International Relations and Global Studies

 

This course is designed to provide foundational knowledge in a particular subject area related to international relations and global studies, providing a link between the introductory course (IRG 301) and capstone seminar (IRG 378) for IRG majors. The scope and the theme of the course cross-cut the broad subject areas the major’s four tracks: international security; international political economy; science, technology, and the environment; and culture, media, and the arts. 

 

There are two over-arching objectives of this course. The first is to examine in some detail ideological concepts related to the IRG major, especially “internationalism,” “globalism,” and “regionalism.” Using insights from history, political science, economics, geography, anthropology, and area studies, we will ask how these “-isms” shape our view of contemporary global affairs. What they can tell us about the nature of today’s international system/systems, the possibility of political and economic global governance, as well as international civil society?

 

A second, related objective is to help students conceive a project for their capstone seminar, normally taken soon after the completion of IRG 320F. Students are required to select a topic of global or regional importance and write a literature review of scholarly articles related to that subject. Through this process, students are exposed to the contemporary academic debates surrounding that subject, and thus are better prepared to complete a capstone project in IRG 378.

 

Texts (subject to amendment):

 

  • Haas, Peter H. and John A Hird, eds. 2013. Controversies in Globalization: Contending Approaches to International Relations. 2nd ed. Thousand Oaks: CQ Press.

Grading breakdown (subject to amendment):

 

  1. Attendance (5 percent)
  2. Response papers (10 percent)
  3. First exam (20 percent)
  4. Second exam (20 percent)
  5. Third exam (20 percent)
  6. Literature review (25 percent)

 

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40250 • Fall 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm GDC 2.502
show description

IRG 378 #40250

Capstone Research, Wednesday

 

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to culture, media and the arts; or science, environment, and technology. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

 

Required Text:  Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader, 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

 

Flags:

Independent Inquiry

Writing

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40255 • Fall 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 2.112
show description

IRG 378 #40255

Capstone Research, Monday

 

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to international political economy, world markets, international organizations and state sovereignty. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

 

Required Text:  Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader, 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

 

Flags:

Independent Inquiry

Writing

IRG F301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

85335 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am PAR 1
show description

Course Description:

 

This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies. Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world including: How has the modern international relations system come into being? What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization? To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today? We will cover material in international security, international political economy, culture, science and technology.

 

 

Grading Policy:                   

 

Students will be evaluated based on attendance, reading response papers, an essay and exams.               

 

 

Reading:

 

Title: Controversies in Globalization: Contending Approaches to International Relations

Author: Petter M. Haas, John A. Hird, editors

Publisher: Sage publication, CQ Press: Thousand Oaks, California

Year: 2013 

ISBN: 978-1-60871-795-8

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

40555-40570 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 900am-1000am GAR 0.102
show description

This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, geography or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry. 

 

Class time will be divided between lecture material (most Mondays and Wednesdays) and discussion (most Fridays).  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance on weekly reading responses, three exams, and a final essay.

 

Texts include: 

  • Introduction to International and Global Studies
  • Selected articles.

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40580 • Spring 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm WAG 308
show description

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to culture, media and the arts; or science, environment, and technology. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

 

Required Text:  Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader, 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

Flag: Independent inquiry; writing.

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40585 • Spring 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.202
show description

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to international political economy, world markets, international organizations and state sovereignty. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

 

Required Text:  Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader, 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

Flag: Independent inquiry; writing.

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

40480-40495 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 900am-1000am FAC 21
show description

This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, geography or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry. 

 

Class time will be divided between lecture material (most Mondays and Wednesdays) and discussion (most Fridays).  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance on weekly reading responses, three exams, and a final essay.

 

Texts include: 

  • Introduction to International and Global Studies
  • Selected articles.

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40510 • Fall 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm PAR 302
show description

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to culture, media and the arts; or science, environment, and technology. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

 

Required Text:  Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader, 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40515 • Fall 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 2.112
show description

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to international political economy, world markets, international organizations and state sovereignty. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

 

Required Text:  Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader, 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

IRG F301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

85640 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CAL 100
show description

Course Description

This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies. Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world including: How has the modern international relations system come into being? What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization? To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today? We will cover material in international security, international political economy, culture, science and technology.

 

Grading Policy

Students will be evaluated based on attendance, reading response papers, an essay and exams.

 

Texts

NA

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

40100-40115 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 900am-1000am MEZ 1.306
show description

This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, geography or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry. 

 

Class time will be divided between lecture material (most Mondays and Wednesdays) and discussion (most Fridays).  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance on weekly reading responses, three exams, and a final essay.

 

Texts include: 

  • Dani Rodrik, The Globalization Paradox (Norton, 2011)
  • Michael Klare, The Race for What’s Left (Metropolitan, 2012)
  • Kwame Anthony Appiah, Cosmopolitanism (Norton, 2006)
  • Selected articles.

 

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40125 • Spring 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.206
show description

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to culture, media and the arts; or science, environment, and technology. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

 

Required Text:  Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader, 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40140 • Spring 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.202
show description

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to international political economy, world markets, international organizations and state sovereignty. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

 

Required Text:  Frank J. Lechner and John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader, 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

39970-39972 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 900am-1000am GAR 0.102
show description

*Instructor for this course is Dr. Stephanie Holmsten*

This course is restricted to IRG majors and a wait list is in place.  For IRG program information please contact Dr. Michael Anderson, Director.

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary major of International Relations and Global Studies. Drawing from the diverse scholarly perspectives of history, government, economics, sociology, geography and anthropology, IRG 301 provides an overview of contemporary global issues, and offers students a window into the four thematic “tracks” they can follow as a major: 1) culture, media, and the arts; 2) international security; 3) science, technology, and the environment; and 4) international political economy.

Grading Policy

Lectures and readings will center around a number of questions related to contemporary global concerns, such as: To what extent can the past several decades be described as an “American century,” and to what degree is this no longer the case? What were the fundamental pillars of the international economy after World War II, and how have they shifted since then? To what extent has economic and cultural globalization merely been a mask for Westernization? What are the consequences of the so-called “rise of the rest” – greater peace and prosperity among nations and peoples, or the greater likelihood of conflict and ecological catastrophe?  Class time will be divided between lecture material and discussion.  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance on weekly reading responses, three exams, and a final essay.

Texts

·      Andrew Bacevich, ed., The Short American Century (Harvard 2012)

·      Dani Rodrik, The Globalization Paradox (Norton, 2011)

·      Michael Klare, The Race for What’s Left (Metropolitan, 2012)

·      Kwame Anthony Appiah, Cosmopolitanism (Norton, 2006)

 

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39980 • Fall 2012
Meets W 300pm-600pm PAR 302
show description

This course is restricted to IRG majors. For IRG program information please contact Dr. Michael Anderson, Director.

The concluding, capstone seminar for the International Relations & Global Studies major is designed to give you an opportunity to draw on your program of studies to prepare a rigorous analysis of a specific aspect of contemporary world affairs.  You have the choice of two formats.  One is a tightly organized research paper; the other is structured as a policy paper directed at a senior decision-maker in a national government or international organization. 

It is profitable to all to set a number of themes for the seminar.  That enhances exchanges and allows for collaborative projects. Still, students will be given reasonable latitude in selecting topics that interest them and/or on which they have acquired specialized knowledge.  We will examine closely the nature of the policy paper and its organization as the semester progresses.  The seminar paper – in either format -  should be viewed as representative of your abilities at this stage in your career and, as such, an effective way of presenting yourself and your abilities.

 The following is a short list of possible themes: democracy promotion as an instrument of foreign policy; the strains among three standards to assess global economic interdependence: growth, equity and stability; the ethical dimensions of the use of force; the interplay of domestic politics and foreign policy process/substance.

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39985 • Fall 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 2.112
show description

This course is restricted to IRG majors. For IRG program information please contact Dr. Michael Anderson, Director.

The concluding, capstone seminar for the International Relations & Global Studies major is designed to give you an opportunity to draw on your program of studies to prepare a rigorous analysis of a specific aspect of contemporary world affairs.  You have the choice of two formats.  One is a tightly organized research paper; the other is structured as a policy paper directed at a senior decision-maker in a national government or international organization. 

It is profitable to all to set a number of themes for the seminar.  That enhances exchanges and allows for collaborative projects. Still, students will be given reasonable latitude in selecting topics that interest them and/or on which they have acquired specialized knowledge.  We will examine closely the nature of the policy paper and its organization as the semester progresses.  The seminar paper – in either format -  should be viewed as representative of your abilities at this stage in your career and, as such, an effective way of presenting yourself and your abilities.

 The following is a short list of possible themes: democracy promotion as an instrument of foreign policy; the strains among three standards to assess global economic interdependence: growth, equity and stability; the ethical dimensions of the use of force; the interplay of domestic politics and foreign policy process/substance.

Dissertation Abstract

How Institutions Affect Political Outcomes at the Intersection of Race and Gender

Committee Chair: Robert Moser

Fields: Comparative Politics and International Relations

My research explores the election of women and ethnic minorities around the world. This study focuses on voting patterns of these two social categories, and explores whether institutions that promote the election of ethnic minorities increase or dampen the election of women.

There are three distinct questions in this project that use unique datasets and a variety of research methods. First, I argue that women tend to gain election through large, mainstream parties from a variety of ideological perspectives because women as a social category have a more diverse set of political opinions. Conversely, ethnic minorities tend to be elected to small, ethnic parties because ethnic minorities as a social category, while internally diverse, have more cohesive party preferences.  Using Comparative Studies of Electoral Systems data from 17 countries, I explore the spread of women and ethnic minority voters among popular political parties, left-right self-placement, and level of attachment to a political party. I find that women divide relatively evenly between the top two most popular parties among women. Ethnic minorities, in contrast, cluster into one dominant party. This is an important difference when we consider electoral institutions that privilege one aspect of identity over another.

I use this finding to then explore the effect of institutions that privilege ethnicity on the election of women. In my second question, I argue that, contrary to expectations, seats specifically designed to elect ethnic minorities such as majority-minority districts or reserved seats (ethnic seats) do not hamper the election of women but instead produce the benefit of substantially increased election of minority women. Previous cross-national work shows that minority women benefit from gender quotas applied to ethnic seats. Using Minorities at Risk data, I explore the election patterns of minority women. I find that minority women benefit from incumbency and are elected to left-leaning parties at significantly higher rates than majority women. In case studies of minority women in Russia and the U.S., I trace the characteristics of ethnic groups (depth of marginalization and assimilation), candidate, party and electoral district to explore their effects on the election of minority women. The unique contribution of this paper is to consider the distinct characteristics of minority women who get elected.

Third, I argue that there is great variation in the election of women among ethnic parties. In general, ethnic parties do not elect as many women as non-ethnic parties. Yet, ethnic parties based on nonreligious cleavages elect similar proportions of women as non-ethnic parties and ethnic parties elect women at the same rate as non-ethnic parties in SMD systems. Using Minorities at Risk qualitative data, as well as in depth case analysis, I explore the elections of particular minority women in India, Israel, Belgium, Romania and the UK to investigate whether characteristics of the ethnic group, such as depth of marginalization and assimilation, or the minority women help to determine their elections.

Publications/Writing Samples

Publications and Writing Samples

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