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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Terri Givens

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles

Terri Givens

Contact

Biography

Terri E. Givens is Associate Professor in the Government Department at the University of Texas at Austin. She was formerly Vice Provost, International Activities and Undergraduate Curriculum, Director of the Center for European Studies, and Director of the France-UT Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her B.A. from Stanford University. Her academic interests include radical right parties, immigration politics, and the politics of race in Europe. She has conducted extensive research in Europe, particularly in France, Germany, Austria and Denmark.

She has received Fellowships from the Wilson Center, the Ford Foundation, the University of California, Berkeley, Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellowship and various other grants and fellowships to support her research in Europe. Her book, Voting Radical Right in Western Europe, was published in Fall 2005 with Cambridge University Press. She has edited the book Immigration Policy and Security with Gary Freeman and David Leal. Her book Legislating Equality: The Politics of Antidiscrimination Policy in Europe appeared in Spring 2014 with Oxford University Press. Her articles have appeared in Comparative Political Studies, the Journal of Common Market Studies, the Policy Studies Journal, and Comparative European Politics. She is an active member of the American Political Science Association, the European Union Studies Association, and the Council for European Studies.  She is a regular columnist with Inside Higher Ed at http://www.insidehighered.com/advice/running.

Terri is an avid runner, and enjoys many outdoor activities in Austin. As the proud mother of two handsome young boys, Andrew and Brandon, she also spends a great deal of time on the soccer fields and investigating the flora and fauna of the area. In her spare time, she gets out to listen to jazz, the symphony, and watches dance performances with her husband, Mike Scott.

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

38795 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 1
(also listed as EUS 350 )
show description

 

Course Description

Europe has experienced major change since World War II, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to European enlargement, with Croatia increasing the size of the EU to 28 member states. European integration, and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe. The current fiscal crisis has complicated politics in the EU, and challenged the survival of both the Euro and the broader European project. This course will introduce the governments and politics of countries in Western Europe and a comparative politics approach will be used.

 

What is comparative politics?

Comparative politics is the field within political science that tries to explain why countries vary in their domestic political institutions, their level of political and economic development, and their public policies.  Other fields in political science include international relations, political theory and American politics.

 

Course Requirements

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the political institutions of European governments and the European Union.  By the end of the course students will be expected to be able to describe the different types of government institutions and how they impact politics and policy making in Europe. They will also be expected to describe some of the important issues facing European governments, including issues related to immigration, the financial crisis and European enlargement. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

 

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings and to attend lecture (the TA will be taking attendance after the first week of class).  Any assignments not completed within a week of the due date will be given a zero.  There will be two exams and weekly assignments.  The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

 

Exam 1                                                            25%

Exam 2                                                            25%

Weekly assignments                                       40%

Participation                                                    10%

Total                                                                100%

 

Plus-Minus grading will be used:

 

Texts

Gallagher, Laver and Mair, Representative Government in Modern Europe (Fifth Edition)

John McCormick, Understanding the European Union: A Concise Introduction (The European Union Series), Fifth edition.

GOV 390L • Comparative Immigration Policy

39105 • Fall 2014
Meets W 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
show description

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Recent Congressional debates over immigration have highlighted the varying approaches that politicians would like to take in order to control the flow of immigrants into the United States.  However, one can argue that the attacks of September 11th brought the issues surrounding immigration to the fore, unlike any other event in the last century.  Other attacks such as the Madrid bombings, the murder of Theo Van Gogh, the London bombings and the Paris “riots” (aka “uprising”) have also highlighted issues of immigration and integration. In the last decade countries around the world have had to examine the ways that they secure their borders and control the flow of people in and out of their country.  In an era of uncertainty, how can we pursue policies that will ensure the security of our borders without closing off flows that are often considered necessary to economic security?

 

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the U.S. and other parts of the world, particularly Europe.  Students will be provided with the tools needed to analyze immigration policy, and describe the arguments for and against particular policies.

 

The course will begin with an examination of immigration law and policy in the United States.  Other issues to be covered include the economics of immigration, refugees and asylum seekers, and security issues since September 11th.  A comparative approach will be used to provide a counterpoint to the U.S. case, as well as to examine the international forces that underpin migration flows.

                                                                                                                       

TEXTS

Tichenor, Dividing Lines:  The Politics of Immigration Control in America

Givens, Freeman and Leal, Immigration Policy and Security:  U.S., European, and Commonwealth Perspectives

Cornelius, et. al., Controlling Immigration: A Global Perspective (Second Edition)

Lahav and Messina, The Migration Reader

Dancyiger, Immigration and Conflict in Europe         

Givens, Legislating Equality

Boswell & Geddes, Migration and Mobility in the European Union

Kunz, Lavenex and Panizzon, Multilayered Migration Governance

Givens and Maxwell, Immigrant Politics

 

GRADING and ASSIGNMENTS

Weekly Assignments              50%

Research Proposal                  50%

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39040 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JGB 2.324
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

Recent positions taken by members of congress on immigration have highlighted the varying approaches that politicians would like to take in order to control the flow of immigrants into the United States.  One can argue that the attacks of September 11th brought the issues surrounding immigration to the fore, unlike any other event in the last century.  Other attacks such as the Madrid bombings, the murder of Theo Van Gogh, the London bombings and the Paris “riots” (aka “uprising”) have also highlighted issues of immigration and integration. In the last decade countries around the world have had to examine the ways that they secure their borders and control the flow of people in and out of their country.  In an era of uncertainty, how can we pursue policies that will ensure the security of our borders without closing off flows which are often considered necessary to economic security?

 

The course will begin with an examination of immigration law and policy in the United States.  Other issues to be covered include the economics of immigration, refugees and asylum seekers, and security issues since September 11th.  A comparative approach will be used to provide a counterpoint to the U.S. case, as well as to examine the international forces which underpin migration flows.

 

TEXTS

 

Daniel Tichenor, Dividing Lines:  The Politics of Immigration Control in America

Givens, Freeman and Leal, Immigration Policy and Security:  U.S. European and Commonwealth Perspectives

 

Other texts will be available online or via Blackboard.

 

GRADING and ASSIGNMENTS

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the U.S. and other parts of the world, particularly Europe.  Students will be provided with the historical background and information on specific issues needed to analyze current immigration policy, and describe the arguments for and against particular policies. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

 

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings, to attend lecture and participate in class discussions.  There will be two exams and 10 short quizzes. 

 

The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

 

Exam 1                                                                                                            30%

Exam 2                                                                                                            30%

Quizzes                                                                                                           40%

Total                                                                                                               100%

 

Plus-Minus grading will be used

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

39095 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ B0.306
(also listed as EUS 350 )
show description

Course Description

Europe has experienced major change since World War II, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to European enlargement, with Bulgaria and Romania increasing the size of the EU to 28 member states.  Enlargements of Europe, European integration, and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe. The current fiscal crisis has complicated politics in the EU, and challenged the survival of both the Euro and the broader European project. This course will introduce the governments and politics of countries in Western Europe and a comparative politics approach will be used.

 

What is comparative politics?

Comparative politics is the field within political science that tries to explain why countries vary in their domestic political institutions, their level of political and economic development, and their public policies.  Other fields in political science include international relations, political theory and American politics.

 

Course Requirements

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the political institutions of European governments and the European Union.  By the end of the course students will be expected to be able to describe the different types of government institutions and how they impact politics and policy making in Europe. They will also be expected to describe some of the important issues facing European governments, including issues related to immigration, the financial crisis and European enlargement. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

 

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings and to attend lecture (the TA will be taking attendance after the first week of class).  Any assignments not completed within a week of the due date will be given a zero.  There will be two exams and weekly assignments.  The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

 

Exam 1                                                          20%

Exam 2                                                          30%

Weekly assignments                                       40%

Participation                                                    10%

Total                                                              100%

 

Plus-Minus grading will be used:

 

Texts

Gallagher, Laver and Mair, Representative Government in Modern Europe (Fifth Edition)

John McCormick, Understanding the European Union: A Concise Introduction (The European Union Series), Fifth edition.

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

39125 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 1
(also listed as EUS 350 )
show description

Course Description

Europe has experienced major change since World War II, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to European enlargement, with Bulgaria and Romania increasing the size of the EU to 27 member states.  Enlargements of Europe, European integration, and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe. The current fiscal crisis has complicated politics in the EU, and challenged the survival of both the Euro and the broader European project. This course will introduce the governments and politics of countries in Western Europe and a comparative politics approach will be used.

Comparative politics is the field within political science that tries to explain why countries vary in their domestic political institutions, their level of political and economic development, and their public policies.  Other fields in political science include international relations, political theory and American politics.

 

Grading Policy

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the political institutions of European governments and the European Union.  By the end of the course students will be expected to be able to describe the different types of government institutions and how they impact politics and policy making in Europe. They will also be expected to describe some of the important issues facing European governments, including issues related to immigration, the financial crisis and European enlargement. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings and to attend lecture (the TA will be taking attendance after the first week of class).  Any assignments not completed within a week of the due date will be given a zero.  There will be two exams and weekly assignments.  The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

Exam 1                                                          20%

Exam 2                                                          30%

Weekly assignments                                       40%

Participation                                                   10%

Total                                                             100%

Plus-Minus grading will be used

 

Texts

Gallagher, Laver and Mair, Representative Government in Modern Europe (Fifth Edition)

John McCormick, Understanding the European Union: A Concise Introduction (The European Union Series), Fifth edition, Aug 16, 2011.

 

GOV 390L • Political Sys Of Western Eur

39415 • Fall 2013
Meets M 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
show description

Course Description

Western European political institutions are often used as the model and baseline for the study of political institutions around the world.  Many of the important works in comparative politics from the 1960s and 1970s based their research on the study of proportional representation, political parties, public opinion, and political economy in Europe.  However, Europe has experienced major change over the last 25 years, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the recent European Union enlargement, with Bulgaria and Romania and Croatia increasing the size of the EU to 28 member states.  European integration, fiscal crisis and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe.  This course will examine some of the earlier classic studies of political systems in Europe, and works that look at how those institutions have changed more recently.

 

Grading Policy

Weekly Assignments              50%

Take home exam                  50%

 

Texts

Institutions:

Gallagher, Laver and Mair (GLM), Representative Government in Modern Europe, Fifth Edition (suggested, not required)

Citizens, Elections, Parties: Approaches to the Comparative Study of the Processes of Development (Ecpr Classics) by Stein Rokkan), Angus Campbell (Author), Per Torsvik (Author), Henry Valen (Author)

Comparative Constitutional Engineering (Second Edition) by Giovanni Sartori

Cabinets and Coalition Bargaining: The Democractic Life Cycle in Western Europe - by Kaare Strøm, Wolfgang C. Müller and Torbjörn Bergman

Making and Breaking Governments: Cabinets and Legislatures in Parliamentary Democracies by Michael Laver (Editor), Kenneth A. Shepsle (Editor), Randall Calvert (Editor)

Parties and Party Systems: A Framework for Analysis (ECPR Press Classics) by Giovanni Sartori

Political Parties in the New Europe: Political and Analytical Challenges by Kurt Richard Luther (Editor)

Citizen Politics: Public Opinion and Political Parties In Advanced Industrial Democracies, 5th Edition by Russell J Dalton

 

Political Economy:

Debating Varieties of Capitalism: A Reader, Bob Hancké (Editor)

Development and Crisis of the Welfare State: Parties and Policies in Global Markets, Evelyne Huber and John D. Stephens

 

European Union:

Politics in the European Union by Ian Bache, Stephen George and Simon Bulmer

The Political System of the European Union / Edition 3 by Simon Hix, Bjrn Hyland

Policy-Making in the European Union by Helen Wallace, Mark A. Pollack and Alasdair R. Young

Multi-Level Governance and European Integration [Paperback] by Liesbet Hooghe and Gary Marks

Migration and Mobility in the European Union by Andrew Geddes, Virginie Guiraudon and Christina Boswell

 

Foreign Policy:

European Foreign Policies: Does Europe Still Matter? Edited by Ronald Tiersky

European Foreign and Security Policy: States, Power, Institutions, and American Hegemony (European Union Studies) by Catherine Gegout

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38715 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JGB 2.324
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Recent positions taken by presidential candidates on immigration have highlighted the varying approaches that politicians would like to take in order to control the flow of immigrants into the United States.  One can argue that the attacks of September 11th brought the issues surrounding immigration to the fore, unlike any other event in the last century.  Other attacks such as the Madrid bombings, the murder of Theo Van Gogh, the London bombings and the Paris “riots” (aka “uprising”) have also highlighted issues of immigration and integration. In the last decade countries around the world have had to examine the ways that they secure their borders and control the flow of people in and out of their country.  In an era of uncertainty, how can we pursue policies that will ensure the security of our borders without closing off flows which are often considered necessary to economic security?

The course will begin with an examination of immigration law and policy in the United States.  Other issues to be covered include the economics of immigration, refugees and asylum seekers, and security issues since September 11th.  A comparative approach will be used to provide a counterpoint to the U.S. case, as well as to examine the international forces which underpin migration flows.

 

GRADING POLICY

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the U.S. and other parts of the world, particularly Europe.  Students will be provided with the historical background and information on specific issues needed to analyze current immigration policy, and describe the arguments for and against particular policies. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings, to attend lecture and participate in class discussions.  There will be two exams and 5 quizzes. 

The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

Exam 1                                                                                                            30%

Exam 2                                                                                                            40%

Quizzes                                                                                                           30%

Total                                                                                                               100%

Plus-Minus grading will be used

 

TEXTS

Daniel Tichenor, Dividing Lines:  The Politics of Immigration Control in America

Givens, Freeman and Leal, Immigration Policy and Security:  U.S. European and Commonwealth Perspectives

Other texts will be available online or via Blackboard (marked with an * in the course outline below).  Readings are subject to change, depending on current events.

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

38765 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ B0.306
(also listed as EUS 350 )
show description

Course Description

Europe has experienced major change since World War II, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to European enlargement, with Bulgaria and Romania increasing the size of the EU to 27 member states.  Enlargements of Europe, European integration, and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe. The current fiscal crisis has complicated politics in the EU, and challenged the survival of both the Euro and the broader European project. This course will introduce the governments and politics of countries in Western Europe and a comparative politics approach will be used.

What is comparative politics?

Comparative politics is the field within political science that tries to explain why countries vary in their domestic political institutions, their level of political and economic development, and their public policies.  Other fields in political science include international relations, political theory and American politics.

 

Grading Policy

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the political institutions of European governments and the European Union.  By the end of the course students will be expected to be able to describe the different types of government institutions and how they impact politics and policy making in Europe. They will also be expected to describe some of the important issues facing European governments, including issues related to immigration, the financial crisis and European enlargement. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings and to attend lecture (the TA will be taking attendance after the first week of class).  Any assignments not completed within a week of the due date will be given a zero.  There will be two exams and weekly assignments.  The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

Exam 1                                                            20%

Exam 2                                                            30%

Weekly assignments                                         40%

Participation                                                     10%

Total                                                               100%

Plus-Minus grading will be used:

 

Text

Gallagher, Laver and Mair (GLM), Representative Government in Modern Europe (Fifth Edition)

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

38665 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 1
(also listed as EUS 350 )
show description

Course Description

Europe has experienced major change since World War II, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to European enlargement, with Bulgaria and Romania increasing the size of the EU to 27 member states.  Enlargements of Europe, European integration, and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe. The current fiscal crisis has complicated politics in the EU, and challenged the survival of both the Euro and the broader European project. This course will introduce the governments and politics of countries in Western Europe and a comparative politics approach will be used.

What is comparative politics?

Comparative politics is the field within political science that tries to explain why countries vary in their domestic political institutions, their level of political and economic development, and their public policies.  Other fields in political science include international relations, political theory and American politics.

 

Grading Policy

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the political institutions of European governments and the European Union.  By the end of the course students will be expected to be able to describe the different types of government institutions and how they impact politics and policy making in Europe. They will also be expected to describe some of the important issues facing European governments, including issues related to immigration, the financial crisis and European enlargement. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings and to attend lecture (the TA will be taking attendance after the first week of class).  Any assignments not completed within a week of the due date will be given a zero.  There will be two exams and weekly assignments.  The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

 

Exam 1                                                            20%

Exam 2                                                            30%

Weekly assignments                                          40%

Participation                                                      10%

Total                                                                100%

 

GOV 390L • Comparative Immigration Policy

38960 • Fall 2012
Meets M 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
show description

Course Description

Recent Congressional debates over immigration have highlighted the varying approaches that politicians would like to take in order to control the flow of immigrants into the United States.  However, one can argue that the attacks of September 11th brought the issues surrounding immigration to the fore, unlike any other event in the last century.  Other attacks such as the Madrid bombings, the murder of Theo Van Gogh, the London bombings and the Paris “riots” (aka “uprising”) have also highlighted issues of immigration and integration. In the last decade countries around the world have had to examine the ways that they secure their borders and control the flow of people in and out of their country.  In an era of uncertainty, how can we pursue policies that will ensure the security of our borders without closing off flows that are often considered necessary to economic security?

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the U.S. and other parts of the world, particularly Europe.  Students will be provided with the tools needed to analyze immigration policy, and describe the arguments for and against particular policies.

The course will begin with an examination of immigration law and policy in the United States.  Other issues to be covered include the economics of immigration, refugees and asylum seekers, and security issues since September 11th.  A comparative approach will be used to provide a counterpoint to the U.S. case, as well as to examine the international forces that underpin migration flows.

 

Grading Policy

Weekly Assignments                   50%

Research Proposal                      50%

 

Texts

Tichenor, Dividing Lines:  The Politics of Immigration Control in America

Givens, Freeman and Leal, Immigration Policy and Security:  U.S., European, and Commonwealth Perspectives

Cornelius, et. al., Controlling Immigration: A Global Perspective (Second Edition)

Lahav and Messina, The Migration Reader

We may also follow newspaper reports if immigration policy becomes an issue for the current administration. 

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38560 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am JES A121A
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Recent Congressional debates over immigration have highlighted the varying approaches that politicians would like to take in order to control the flow of immigrants into the United States.  One can argue that the attacks of September 11th brought the issues surrounding immigration to the fore, unlike any other event in the last century.  Other attacks such as the Madrid bombings, the murder of Theo Van Gogh, the London bombings and the Paris “riots” (aka “uprising”) have also highlighted issues of immigration and integration. In the last decade countries around the world have had to examine the ways that they secure their borders and control the flow of people in and out of their country.  In an era of uncertainty, how can we pursue policies that will ensure the security of our borders without closing off flows which are often considered necessary to economic security?

The course will begin with an examination of immigration law and policy in the United States.  Other issues to be covered include the economics of immigration, refugees and asylum seekers, and security issues since September 11th.  A comparative approach will be used to provide a counterpoint to the U.S. case, as well as to examine the international forces which underpin migration flows.

TEXTS

Daniel Tichenor, Dividing Lines:  The Politics of Immigration Control in America

 

Givens, Freeman and Leal, Immigration Policy and Security:  U.S. European and Commonwealth Perspectives

Other texts will be available online or via Blackboard.

GRADING and ASSIGNMENTS

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the U.S. and other parts of the world, particularly Europe.  Students will be provided with the historical background and information on specific issues needed to analyze current immigration policy, and describe the arguments for and against particular policies. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

Exam 1         20%

Exam 2         30%

Weekly assignments         30%

In-class assignments & Participation        20%

Total              100%

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

38610 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as EUS 350 )
show description

Course Description

Europe has experienced major change over the last 25 years, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the recent European enlargement, with Bulgaria and Romania increasing the size of the EU to 27 member states.  Enlargements of Europe, European integration, and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe.  This course will introduce the governments and politics of countries in Western Europe and a comparative politics approach will be used.

What is comparative politics?

Comparative politics is the field within political science that tries to explain why countries vary in their domestic political institutions, their level of political and economic development, and their public policies.  Other fields in political science include international relations, political theory and American politics.

Course Requirements

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the political institutions of European governments and the European Union.  By the end of the course students will be expected to be able to describe the different types of government institutions and how they impact politics and policy making in Europe. They will also be expected to describe some of the important issues facing European governments, including issues related to immigration, the financial crisis and European enlargement. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

 To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings and to attend lecture (the TA will be taking attendance after the first week of class).  Any assignments not completed within a week of the due date will be given a zero.  There will be two exams and weekly assignments. 

The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

Exam 1                    20%

Exam 2                     30%

Weekly assignments   40%

Participation               10%

Total                         100%

Plus-Minus grading will be used.

Readings

Gallagher, Laver and Mair (GLM), Representative Government in Modern Europe (Fifth Edition)

Documents from the European Union

Items from the Economist, Financial Times, New York Times and online sources

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

38665 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 1
(also listed as EUS 350 )
show description

Course Description

Europe has experienced major change over the last 25 years, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the recent European enlargement, with Bulgaria and Romania increasing the size of the EU to 27 member states.  Enlargements of Europe, European integration, and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe.  This course will introduce the governments and politics of countries in Western Europe and a comparative politics approach will be used.

What is comparative politics?

Comparative politics is the field within political science that tries to explain why countries vary in their domestic political institutions, their level of political and economic development, and their public policies.  Other fields in political science include international relations, political theory and American politics.

 

Course Requirements

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the political institutions of European governments and the European Union.  By the end of the course students will be expected to be able to describe the different types of government institutions and how they impact politics and policy making in Europe. They will also be expected to describe some of the important issues facing European governments, including issues related to immigration, the financial crisis and European enlargement. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings and to attend lecture (the TA will be taking attendance after the first week of class).  Any assignments not completed within a week of the due date will be given a zero.  There will be two exams and weekly assignments.  The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

Exam 1                    20%

Exam 2                     30%

Weekly assignments                 40%

Participation                     10%

Total                         100%

 

Plus-Minus grading will be used.

Readings

European Politics: A Comparative Introduction, 2nd edition by Tim Bale

Documents from the European Union

Items from the Economist, Financial Times, New York Times and online sources

 

GOV 390L • Political Sys Of Western Eur

38958 • Fall 2011
Meets M 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
show description

DescriptionWestern European political institutions are often used as the model and baseline for the study of political institutions around the world.  Many of the important works in comparative politics from the 1960s and 1970s based their research on the study of proportional representation, political parties, public opinion, and political economy in Europe.  However, Europe has experienced major change over the last 25 years, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the recent European Union enlargement, with Bulgaria and Romania increasing the size of the EU to 27 member states.  European integration, fiscal crisis and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe.  This course will examine some of the earlier classic studies of political systems in Europe, and works that look at how those institutions have changed more recently.

Grading Policy

Weekly Assignments        50%

Take home exam        50%

Texts

InstitutionsEuropean Politics: A Comparative Introduction, 2nd edition by Tim Bale (suggested, not required)Citizens, Elections, Parties: Approaches to the Comparative Study of the Processes of Development (Ecpr Classics) by Stein Rokkan), Angus Campbell (Author), Per Torsvik (Author), Henry Valen (Author)Comparative Constitutional Engineering (Second Edition) by Giovanni SartoriCabinets and Coalition Bargaining: The Democractic Life Cycle in Western Europe - by Kaare Strøm, Wolfgang C. Müller and Torbjörn BergmanMaking and Breaking Governments: Cabinets and Legislatures in Parliamentary Democracies by Michael Laver (Editor), Kenneth A. Shepsle (Editor), Randall Calvert (Editor)Parties and Party Systems: A Framework for Analysis (ECPR Press Classics) by Giovanni SartoriPolitical Parties in the New Europe: Political and Analytical Challenges by Kurt Richard Luther (Editor)Citizen Politics: Public Opinion and Political Parties In Advanced Industrial Democracies, 5th Edition by Russell J Dalton

Political Economy

Debating Varieties of Capitalism: A Reader, Bob Hancké (Editor)Development and Crisis of the Welfare State: Parties and Policies in Global Markets, Evelyne Huber and John D. Stephens

European Union

Politics in the European Union by Ian Bache, Stephen George and Simon BulmerThe Political System of the European Union / Edition 3 by Simon Hix, Bjrn HylandPolicy-Making in the European Union by Helen Wallace, Mark A. Pollack and Alasdair R. YoungMulti-Level Governance and European Integration [Paperback] by Liesbet Hooghe and Gary MarksMigration and Mobility in the European Union by Andrew Geddes, Virginie Guiraudon and Christina BoswellForeign Policy

European Foreign Policies: Does Europe Still Matter? Edited by Ronald Tiersky European Foreign and Security Policy: States, Power, Institutions, and American Hegemony (European Union Studies) by Catherine Gegout

 

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

38850 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as EUS 350 )
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Course DescriptionEurope has experience major change over the last 25 years, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the recent European enlargement, with Bulgaria and Romania increasing the size of the EU to 27 member states.  Enlargements of Europe, European integration, and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe.  This course will introduce the governments and politics of countries in Western Europe and a comparative politics approach will be used. What is comparative politics? Comparative politics is the field within political science that tries to explain why countries vary in their domestic political institutions, their level of political and economic development, and their public policies.  Other fields in political science include international relations, political theory and American politics. Course Requirements To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings, to attend lecture (the TA will be taking attendance after the first week of class) and to complete all assignments.  You cannot receive a grade if you have not turned in all assignments.  There will be one midterm, a final exam and weekly assignments.  Over the course of the quarter, all students will be asked to write 4 short in-class assignments. These will be unannounced and will ask you to respond to a question or two about the readings for the day.

 

The overall grading breakdown is as follows: 

Midterm                                                          20%

Final Exam                                                      30%

Weekly assignments                                        40%

In class assignments & Participation              10%

Total                                                                100% 

 

Texts:

Gallagher, Laver and Mair (GLM), Representative Government in Modern Europe (Fourth Edition)Other readings will be available via Blackboard

GOV 390L • Comparative Immigration Policy

39214 • Spring 2011
Meets W 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
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DescriptionOne can argue that the attacks of September 11 highlighted the issues surrounding immigration unlike any other event in the last century.  Other attacks such as the Madrid bombings, the murder of Theo Van Gogh, and the London bombings have also highlighted issues of immigration and integration. In the last decade countries around the world have had to examine the ways that they secure their borders and control the flow of people in and out of their country.  In an era of uncertainty, how can we pursue policies that will ensure the security of our borders without closing off flows that are often considered necessary to economic security? This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the U.S. and other parts of the world, particularly Europe.  Students will be provided with the tools needed to analyze immigration policy, and describe the arguments for and against particular policies. Grading PolicyWeekly Assignments        50%Research Proposal        50%TextsDaniel Tichenor, Dividing Lines:  The Politics of Immigration Control in AmericaTerri E. Givens, Gary P. Freeman, and David L. Leal, Immigration Policy and Security:  U.S., European and Commonwealth PerspectivesOther texts TBA

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38425 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
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Course Description:

Recent Congressional debates over immigration have highlighted the varying approaches that politicians would like to take in order to control the flow of immigrants into the United States.  However, one can argue that the attacks of September 11th brought the issues surrounding immigration to the fore, unlike any other event in the last century.  Other attacks such as the Madrid bombings, the murder of Theo Van Gogh, the London bombings and the Paris “riots” (aka “uprising”) have also highlighted issues of immigration and integration. In the last decade countries around the world have had to examine the ways that they secure their borders and control the flow of people in and out of their country.  In an era of uncertainty, how can we pursue policies that will ensure the security of our borders without closing off flows that are often considered necessary to economic security?
 
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the U.S. and other parts of the world, particularly Europe.  Students will be provided with the tools needed to analyze immigration policy, and describe the arguments for and against particular policies.
 
The course will begin with an examination of immigration law and policy in the United States.  Other issues to be covered include the economics of immigration, refugees and asylum seekers, and security issues since September 11th.  A comparative approach will be used to provide a counterpoint to the U.S. case, as well as to examine the international forces that underpin migration flows.


Grading Policy and Assignments:

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings, to attend lecture, participate in class discussions, and to complete ALL assignments.  There will be two exams and a final written project which will be a 4-5 page paper describing a way to reform some aspect of U.S. immigration policy.
 
Over the course of the quarter, all students will be asked to write 4 short in-class assignments (a.k.a. pop-quizzes). These will be unannounced and will ask you to respond to a question or two about the readings for the day.   These assignments will be part of your participation grade.

There will be 10 regular weekly written assignments, most of which will help you to think about your final project.  These assignments will be short – at the most you will be asked to write a paragraph or two.  The assignments will be given out at the end of class each Wednesday (also available on the blackboard website) and are due at the beginning of class the following Friday – you will have more than a week to complete each assignment.  The overall grading breakdown is as follows:
 
Exam 1                                                            20%
Exam 2                                                            20%
Weekly assignments                                         20%
In-class assignments & Participation                  20%
Final Project                                                    20%
Total                                                               100%

                                                                                                                       
Textbooks:
Daniel Tichenor, Dividing Lines:  The Politics of Immigration Control in America
Givens, Freeman and Leal, Immigration Policy and Security:  U.S., European, and Commonwealth Perspectives
Other texts will be available via Blackboard
We may also follow newspaper reports if immigration policy becomes an issue for the current administration
 

 

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

38505 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 1
(also listed as EUS 350 )
show description

Course Description:
Europe has experienced major change over the last 25 years, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the recent European enlargement, with Bulgaria and Romania increasing the size of the EU to 27 member states.  Enlargements of Europe, European integration, and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe.  This course will introduce the governments and politics of countries in Western Europe and a comparative politics approach will be used.
 
What is comparative politics?
Comparative politics is the field within political science that tries to explain why countries vary in their domestic political institutions, their level of political and economic development, and their public policies.  Other fields in political science include international relations, political theory and American politics.
 
Grading Policy:
To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings, to attend lecture (the TA will be taking attendance after the first week of class) and to complete all assignments.  You cannot receive a grade if you have not turned in all assignments.  There will be one midterm, a final exam and weekly assignments.  Over the course of the quarter, all students will be asked to write 4 short in-class assignments. These will be unannounced and will ask you to respond to a question or two about the readings for the day. The overall grading breakdown is as follows:
 
Midterm                                                          20%
Final Exam                                                      30%
Weekly assignments                                        40%
In class assignments & Participation                  10%
Total                                                                100%
 
Textbooks:
Gallagher, Laver and Mair (GLM), Representative Government in Modern Europe (Fourth Edition)
Other readings will be available via Blackboard

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