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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Tasha Philpot

Associate Professor Ph.D., Political Science, University of Michigan

Tasha Philpot

Contact

Biography

Tasha Philpot is an Associate Professor of Government  at the University of Texas at Austin.  She is also affiliated with the Center for African and African American Studies and the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies.   She received her B.A. from Marquette University, her M.P.P. from the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan. Professor Philpot specializes in American Politics.   Her particular interests are in African-American Politics, Political Psychology, Public Opinion and Political Behavior, Political Communication, and Political Parties. Her work has been published in The American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Black Studies, PS: Political Science and Politics, Political Behavior, Public Opinion Quarterly, National Political Science Review, and the Journal of Politics. In addition, she is the author of Race, Republicans, and the Return of the Party of Lincoln (2007, University of Michigan Press), which examines the circumstances under which political parties can use racial symbols to reshape their images among the electorate and the co-editor of African-American Political Psychology: Identity, Opinion, and Action in the Post-Civil Rights Era (2010, with Ismail K. White, Palgrave Macmillan Press).

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38755 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GSB 2.124
show description

Description

 

This course examines the ways in which the media shape how we think about race. In doing so, this course will first explore the nature and construction of race. Second, it will examine the media establishment and its role in politics. Third, it will apply theories of media norms to explore how racial stereotypes of the four largest minority groups in the U.S. are created and perpetuated. Finally, this course will examine the effects of racialized media images on political processes.

 

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

 

Prerequisites

 

Twenty-four semester hours of college coursework, including Government 310L, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test (or an appropriate assessment test).

 

Required Text Books

 

Wilson II, Clint C., Felix Gutierrez, and Lena M. Chao.  2012.  Racism, Sexism and the Media: The Rise of Class Communication in Multicultural America, 4th Ed.  Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

 

Graber, Doris A and Johanna Dunaway.  2014.  Mass Media and American Politics, 9nd Ed.  Washington, DC: CQ Press.

 

Grading

 

Exam 1                                                25%

Term Paper                              25%

Exam 2                                    25%

Quizzes and in-class assignments                   25%

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39050 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 100
show description

Description

 

This course examines the ways in which the media shape how we think about race. In doing so, this course will first explore the nature and construction of race. Second, it will examine the media establishment and its role in politics. Third, it will apply theories of media norms to explore how racial stereotypes of the four largest minority groups in the U.S. are created and perpetuated. Finally, this course will examine the effects of racialized media images on political processes.

 

Prerequisites

 

Twenty-four semester hours of college coursework, including Government 310L, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test (or an appropriate assessment test).

 

Required Text Books

 

There are two required text books for this course. Both books are available at the University Co-op.

 

Wilson II, Clint C., Felix Gutierrez, and Lena M. Chao.  2003.  Racism, Sexism and the Media: The Rise of Class Communication in Multicultural America, 3rd Ed.  Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

 

Iyengar, Shanto.  2011.  Media and Politics: A Citizen’s Guide, 2nd Ed.  New York: Norton & Co.

 

Grading

 

Exam 1                                                25%

Term Paper                                          25%

Exam 2                                                25%

Quizzes and in-class assignments       25%

GOV 370K • African American Politics

39330 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 374D )
show description

Description

 

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African-American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors, creators and initiators in the political process. Specifically, this course will examine various political controversies that surround the role of race in American society and how these controversies affect public opinion, political institutions, political behavior, and salient public policy debates. This course will assess and evaluate the contemporary influence of race in each of these domains while also exploring their historical antecedents.

 

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

 

Prerequisites

 

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 

Required Text Books

 

There are two required text books for this course, which are available at the University Co-op:

 

Walton, Hanes, Jr. and Robert C. Smith. 2012.  American Politics and the African American Quest for Universal Freedom. 6th  Edition. New York: Addison Wesley Longman.

 

Philpot, Tasha S., and Ismail K. White, eds. 2010. African-American Political Psychology: Identity, Opinion, and Action in the Post-Civil Rights Era. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Grading

 

Exam 1                                                25%

Term Paper                                          25%

Exam 2                                                25%

Quizzes and in-class assignments       25%

 

Flag: Cultrual diversity

GOV 391J • Statistical Anly In Pol Sci I

39420 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BAT 1.104
show description

This course is an introduction to statistics, probability, and data analysis. Topics include properties of data, probability and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and significance tests. The course is meant to provide a solid foundation for understanding the basics in quantitative analysis but is not meant for students interested in continuing the graduate quantitative methods sequence in Government.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38736 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ B0.306
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See syllabus

GOV 370K • African American Politics

38969 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.202
(also listed as AFR 374D )
show description

Prerequisites

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 

Course Description

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African-American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors, creators and initiators in the political process. Specifically, this course will examine various political controversies that surround the role of race in American society and how these controversies affect public opinion, political institutions, political behavior, and salient public policy debates. This course will assess and evaluate the contemporary influence of race in each of these domains while also exploring their historical antecedents.

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

 

  

Required Text Books

There are two required text books for this course, which are available at the University Co-op:

 Walton, Hanes, Jr. and Robert C. Smith. 2010.  American Politics and the African American Quest for Universal Freedom. 5th  Edition. New York: Addison Wesley Longman.

 Philpot, Tasha S., and Ismail K. White, eds. 2010. African-American Political Psychology: Identity, Opinion, and Action in the Post-Civil Rights Era. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Supplementary Readings

Readings not found in the required texts can be accessed through Blackboard (courses.utexas.edu).

 

Grading Policy

Your grade will be based on two exams (25% each), one 10-page paper (25%), and several pop quizzes/in-class assignments (25%). The format for the two exams will be a combination of short answer and essays and will cover the lectures, films, and readings. Exams will NOT be cumulative.  Quizzes will be given at random and at any time during lecture. Frequently, I give quizzes at the beginning of class so be on time.  If you miss a quiz because of tardiness, you CANNOT make it up.  Each quiz/in-class assignment will be worth 5 points each. You will receive one point for just handing in a quiz/in-class assignment. Credit for the remaining 4 points is determined by the quality of your work. Your quiz/in-class assignment grade will be calculated by taking the total number of points that you have earned divided by the total number of points available minus one quiz. In other words, each student can miss one quiz without it counting against his/her grade.  Your quiz grade is a weighted average, with a maximum of 25 points.  In the case of a conflict, please notify me ahead of time so that we can make alternative arrangements. Without prior notification and proper documentation, missed quizzes, assignments and exams cannot be made up. NO EXCEPTIONS.

 

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38630 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JES A121A
show description

Prerequisites

 Twenty-four semester hours of college coursework, including Government 310L, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test (or an appropriate assessment test).

 

Description

This course examines the ways in which the media shape how we think about race. In doing so, this course will first explore the nature and construction of race. Second, it will examine the media establishment and its role in politics. Third, it will apply theories of media norms to explore how racial stereotypes of the four largest minority groups in the U.S. are created and perpetuated. Finally, this course will examine the effects of racialized media images on political processes.

 

Grading Policy

Your grade will be based on two exams, one term paper, and several pop quizzes/in-class assignments. The format for the two exams will be a combination of multiple choice and essays and will cover the lectures, films, and readings.  Quizzes will be given at random and at any time during lecture. Frequently, I give quizzes at the beginning of class so be on time.  If you miss a quiz because of tardiness, you CANNOT make it up.  Each quiz/in-class assignment will be worth 5 points each. You will receive one point for just handing in a quiz/in-class assignment. Credit for the remaining 4 points is determined by the quality of your work. Your quiz/in-class assignment grade will be calculated by taking the total number of points that you have earned divided by the total number of points available minus one quiz. In other words, each student can miss one quiz without it counting against his/her grade.  Your quiz grade is a weighted average (see below), with a maximum of 25 points.  In the case of a conflict, please notify me ahead of time so that we can make alternative arrangements. Without prior notification and proper documentation, missed quizzes, assignments and exams cannot be made up. NO EXCEPTIONS. The weight of each assignment in determining your final grade is as follows:

 

Exam 1 (March 22)                                        25%

Term Paper (due April 12)                              25%

Exam 2 (May 3)                                            25%

Quizzes and in-class assignments                   25%

 

A         93-100

A-        90-92

B+       87-89

B         83-86

B-        80-82

C+       77-79

C         73-76

C-        70-72

D         60-69

F          0-59

 

 

Texts

There are two required text books for this course. Both books are available at the University Co-op.

Larson, Stephanie Greco.  2005.  Media and Minorities: The Politics of Race in News and Entertainment.  Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

Leighley, Jan E. 2003.  Mass Media and Politics: A Social Science Perspective. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Supplementary Readings: Readings not found in the required texts can be accessed through Blackboard (courses.utexas.edu).

 

GOV 391J • Statistical Anly In Pol Sci I

38975 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BAT 1.104
show description

Course Description

This course is an introduction to statistics, probability, and data analysis. Topics include properties of data, probability and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and significance tests. The course is meant to provide a solid foundation for understanding the basics in quantitative analysis but is not meant for students interested in continuing the graduate quantitative methods sequence in Government.

Texts

Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38550 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm JES A121A
show description

Issues and Polices in American Government: Race, Media, and Politics

Description

 

This course examines the ways in which the media shape how we think about race. In doing so, this course will first explore the nature and construction of race. Second, it will examine the media establishment and its role in politics. Third, it will apply theories of media norms to explore how racial stereotypes of the four largest minority groups in the U.S. are created and perpetuated. Finally, this course will examine the effects of racialized media images on political processes.

Required Text Books

 There are two required text books for this course. Both books are available at the University Co-op.

Larson, Stephanie Greco.  2005.  Media and Minorities: The Politics of Race in News and Entertainment.  Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

Leighley, Jan E. 2003.  Mass Media and Politics: A Social Science Perspective. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

GOV 370K • African American Politics

38823 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 208
(also listed as AFR 374D )
show description

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African-American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors, creators and initiators in the political process. Specifically, this course will examine various political controversies that surround the role of race in American society and how these controversies affect public opinion, political institutions, political behavior, and salient public policy debates. This course will assess and evaluate the contemporary influence of race in each of these domains while also exploring their historical antecedents.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38625 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am JES A121A
show description

This course examines the ways in which the media shape how we think about race. In doing so, this course will first explore the nature and construction of race. Second, it will examine the media establishment and its role in politics. Third, it will apply theories of media norms to explore how racial stereotypes of the four largest minority groups in the U.S. are created and perpetuated. Finally, this course will examine the effects of racialized media images on political processes.

GOV 370K • African American Politics

38825 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 101
(also listed as AFR 374D )
show description

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African-American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors, creators and initiators in the political process. Specifically, this course will examine various political controversies that surround the role of race in American society and how these controversies affect public opinion, political institutions, political behavior, and salient public policy debates. This course will assess and evaluate the contemporary influence of race in each of these domains while also exploring their historical antecedents.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38795 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Issues and Polices in American Government: Race, Media, and Politics

Description

 

This course examines the ways in which the media shape how we think about race. In doing so, this course will first explore the nature and construction of race. Second, it will examine the media establishment and its role in politics. Third, it will apply theories of media norms to explore how racial stereotypes of the four largest minority groups in the U.S. are created and perpetuated. Finally, this course will examine the effects of racialized media images on political processes.

Required Text Books

 There are two required text books for this course. Both books are available at the University Co-op.

Larson, Stephanie Greco.  2005.  Media and Minorities: The Politics of Race in News and Entertainment.  Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

Leighley, Jan E. 2003.  Mass Media and Politics: A Social Science Perspective. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38440 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm JES A121A
show description

Course Description: This course examines the ways in which the media shape how we think about race. In doing so, this course will first explore the nature and construction of race. Second, it will examine the media establishment and its role in politics. Third, it will apply theories of media norms to explore how racial stereotypes are created and perpetuated. Finally, this course will examine the effects of racialized media images on political processes.
 
Grading Policy: TBD


Textbooks:      

Larson, Stephanie Greco.  2005.  Media and Minorities: The Politics of Race in News and Entertainment.  Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
Leighley, Jan E. 2003.  Mass Media and Politics: A Social Science Perspective. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

GOV 370K • African American Politics

38670 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BAT 5.102
(also listed as AFR 374D )
show description

Course Description: This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African-American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors, creators and initiators in the political process. Specifically, this course will examine various political controversies that surround the role of race in American society and how these controversies affect public opinion, political institutions, political behavior, and salient public policy debates. This course will assess and evaluate the contemporary influence of race in each of these domains while also exploring their historical antecedents.

Grading Policy: TBD


Textbooks:  TBD

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39050 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 MEZ 1.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

38180 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

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