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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Patricia Maclachlan

Associate Professor Ph.D., Columbia University

Patricia Maclachlan

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 232-1724
  • Office: BAT 3.150
  • Office Hours: FALL 2009: Tuesdays 1-2:15 p.m. and Thursday 11:15-12:30 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: A1800

Biography

Patricia Maclachlan, who arrived at UT in 1997, is now Associate Professor of Government and Asian Studies.  She received her Ph.D in political science and Japan studies in 1996 from Columbia University and spent one year as a research associate in the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations at Harvard University. Her research interests include consumer politics and culture in advanced industrial democracies, with a focus on Japan. She is now completing a book on the history and politics of the Japanese postal system.

Professor Maclachlan is the author of Consumer Politics in Postwar Japan: The Institutional Boundaries of Citizen Advocacy (NY: Columbia University Press, 2002), and a co-editor and contributing author to The Ambivalent Consumer: Questioning Consumption in East Asia and the West (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2006). She has also written several articles and book chapters on consumer-related issues in Japan and the West, Japanese civil society, and on Japanese postal reform.

Courses taught: Politics in Japan; Japanese Foreign Policy; Civil Society in East Asia (graduate seminar); Intro to International Relations of E and SE Asia; Perspectives on Japanese Culture; Consumption in East Asia; Japanese Politics (graduate seminar).

GOV 365L • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

38920 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 203
(also listed as ANS 361 )
show description

 

Fall 2014

International Relations of East and Southeast Asia

GOV 365L-3/ANS 361-23 (Global Cultures Flag)

Patricia Maclachlan

TTH 12:30-2:00, PAR 203

Prerequisites

6 semester hours of lower-division Government courses.  Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit.

 

Course Description

Toward the end of the 20th century, pundits looked to the spectacular economic growth of East and Southeast Asia and predicted that the 21st century would be the “Pacific Century.”  Although analysts have been far less optimistic about the economic and political future of the region following the 1997 financial crisis, most nevertheless agree that the region has more growth potential than any other part of the world.  It is also home to some of the globe’s most dangerous “hot spots.”

 

This upper division undergraduate course introduces students to some of the major themes and topics in the post-Cold War international relations of East and Southeast Asia: “Great Power” (China, Japan, and the United States) contributions and challenges to the military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of economic globalization and institutional integration in the Asia-Pacific, and the impact of nationalism and historical memory on intra-regional affairs.  Along the way, we will explore the ongoing North Korean nuclear threat, tensions between China and Taiwan, and the United States’ so-called Asia Pivot, as well as basic theoretical approaches to the study of international relations.

 

Grading Policy

         1.    Quizzes on readings: 15%

         2.    First mid-term exam: 20%

         3.    Second mid-term exam or short research paper:  25%

         4.    Final exam: 40%

 

Texts

         1.    Susan L. Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower (2008)

         2.    Victor Cha, The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future (2012)

         3.    Daniel Chirot, Gi-Wook Shin, and Daniel Sneider, eds., Confronting

              Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies (2014)

 

 Additional readings will be made available at the beginning of the semester.   

GOV 365L • Political Economy Of Asia

38926 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 206
(also listed as ANS 361 )
show description

Fall 2014

Political Economy of Asia

GOV 365L/ANS 361 (Global Cultures/Writing Flags)

Patricia Maclachlan

TTH: 9:30-11:00

 

Course Description

This intensive reading and writing course explores the dynamic political economies of Japan, China and South Korea.  We will examine the reasons for the region’s “miraculous” GDP growth rates; the notion of the “developmental state” and the role of industrial policy in economic development; the nature of government-business relationships; industrial structure (chaebol, keiretsu, Chinese State-Owned Enterprises); the experiences of East Asian consumers and workers; East Asian approaches to social welfare; and the reactions (both positive and negative) of East Asian political economies to the pressures of globalization.  In addition to analyzing these topics from theoretical, comparative, and historical perspectives, the course introduces students to political-economic themes and concepts that will benefit them in their reading of current events in global economics and finance. 

 

Individual classes will alternate between lectures and seminar-style sessions based on discussions of assigned readings. Some knowledge of East Asia and or comparative politics/political economy is recommended but not required.

 

Grading Policy 

1.  Quizzes:  15%

2.  Two take-home midterm exams (5 pages each):  20%

3.  Research paper (4,000-4,500 words) in 2 drafts:  40%

4.  Final exam:  25%

 

Texts

1.   Barry Naughton, The Chinese Economy: Transition and Growth (2007)

 

Additional readings will be made available at the beginning of the semester.

GOV 365L • Japanese Foreign Policy

39260 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.124
(also listed as ANS 361 )
show description

Prerequisite

Six semester hours of lower-division Government courses.  Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit.

 

Course Description

This course introduces upper level undergraduates to the foreign and domestic determinants of Japanese foreign policy-making and international relations from the beginning of the modern era (1868) to the present.  We will address a wide range of topics, including the causes and consequences of the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese wars, Japanese colonialism and actions during World War II, the U.S. Occupation of Japan (1945-52), and the history and significance of the U.S.-Japan military alliance. Particular attention will be paid to issues affecting the contemporary balance-of-power in East Asia: the rise of Japanese nationalism, ongoing tensions with China and North Korea, and Japan’s gradual movement toward a more robust military posture.

 

Grading Policy

        Quizzes: 10%

         2 midterms: 40%

         Short research paper or book review (5 pgs): 15%

         Final exam: 35%

 

Texts

Kenneth B. Pyle, Japan Rising: The Resurgence of Japanese Power and Purpose (2008).

Additional readings will be made available to students at the beginning of the semester.

GOV 365L • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

39265 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 203
(also listed as ANS 361 )
show description

 

Prerequisite

6 semester hours of lower-division Government courses.  Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit.

 

Course Description

Toward the end of the 20th century, pundits looked to the spectacular economic growth of East and Southeast Asia and predicted that the 21st century would be the “Pacific Century”.  Although analysts have been far less optimistic about the economic and political future of the region following the 1997 financial crisis, most nevertheless agree that the region has the most growth potential compared to any other region in the world.  It is also home to some of the globe’s most dangerous “hot spots”: North Korea’s ongoing nuclear threat, tensions in the Taiwan Straits, and escalating tensions between Japan and China over islands in the East China Sea.       

This upper division undergraduate course introduces students to some of the basic themes of the post-Cold War international relations of East and Southeast Asia.  In addition to tracking current events in the region, we explore basic theoretical approaches to international relations, “Great Power” (China, Japan and the United States) contributions and challenges to the military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of economic globalization and institutional integration in the Asia-Pacific, and the nature of and potential solutions to the North Korean security threat.      

 

Grading Policy

         1.    Quizzes on readings: 15%

         2.    First mid-term exam: 20%

         3.    Second mid-term exam or short research paper:  25%

         4.    Final exam: 40%

 

Texts

         1.    Susan L. Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower (2008)

         2.    Victor Cha, The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future (2012)

 Additional readings will be made available at the beginning of the semester.   

GOV 365L • Political Economy Of Asia

38790 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 2.124
(also listed as ANS 361 )
show description

Course Description

This intensive reading and writing course explores the political economies of East Asia—by all accounts the world’s most economically dynamic region. With an emphasis on Japan, China and South Korea, we examine a number of themes that have intrigued both scholars and policymakers over the years: the reasons for the region’s “miraculous” GDP growth rates; the notion of the “developmental state” and the role of industrial policy in economic development; the nature of government-business relationships; industrial structure (chaebol, keiretsu, Chinese State-Owned Enterprises); the experiences of East Asian consumers and workers; the business community’s contributions to the development of East Asian welfare states; and the reactions (both positive and negative) of East Asian political economies to the pressures of globalization.  In addition to examining these themes from theoretical, comparative, and historical perspectives, the course introduces students to political-economic themes and concepts that will benefit them in their reading of current events in global economics and finance. 

Individual classes will alternate between lectures and seminar-style sessions based on discussions of assigned readings. Some knowledge of East Asia and or comparative politics/political economy is recommended but not required.

This course has a writing flag.

 

Grading Policy 

1.  Attendance and participation in class discussions:  15%

2.  Two take-home midterm exams (5 pages each):  20%

3.  Research paper (4,000-4,500 words) in 2 drafts:  40%

4.  Final exam:  25%

 

Texts

1.  Chalmers Johnson, MITI and the Japanese Miracle (1982)

2.  Ming Wan, The Political Economy of East Asia: Striving for Wealth and Power (2008)

3.  Barry Naughton, The Chinese Economy: Transition and Growth (2007)

A packet of book chapters, government reports and journal articles will be available for purchase at the beginning of the semester.

GOV 365L • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

38795 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 201
(also listed as ANS 361 )
show description

Prerequisites

Six hours of Government are recommended but not required. No prior knowledge of the region is required.        

Course Description

Toward the end of the 20th century, pundits looked to the spectacular economic growth of East and Southeast Asia and predicted that the 21st century would be the “Pacific Century”.  Although analysts have been far less optimistic about the economic and political future of the region following the 1997 financial crisis, most nevertheless agree that the region has the most growth potential compared to any other region in the world.  It is also home to some of the globe’s most dangerous “hot spots”: North Korea’s ongoing nuclear threat, tensions in the Taiwan Straits, and escalating tensions between Japan and China.        This upper division undergraduate course introduces students to some of the basic themes of the post-Cold War international relations of East and Southeast Asia.  In addition to tracking current events in the region, we explore basic theoretical approaches to international relations, “Great Power” (China, Japan and the United States) contributions and challenges to the military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of economic globalization and institutional integration in the Asia-Pacific, and the nature of and potential solutions to the North Korean security threat.      

 

Grading Policy

         1.    Quizzes on readings: 15%

         2.    First mid-term exam: 20%

         3.    Second mid-term exam or short research paper:  25%

         4.    Final exam: 40%

 

Texts

         1.    Susan L. Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower (2008)

         2.    David Shambaugh and Michael Yahuda, eds., International Relations of Asia (2008).

         3.    Joseph E. Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents (2002).    

A selection of book chapters and journal articles will also be made available to students online.

GOV 321M • Politics In Japan

38605 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 201
(also listed as ANS 321M )
show description

This upper-division course surveys themes and topics in the domestic politics of postwar Japan.  We begin the course with an analysis of the Allied Occupation and the development of postwar political institutions, and then explore a range of different subjects, including the evolving government-business relationship, the electoral and political party systems, citizen participation in politics in the environmental and consumer spheres, policy toward women and minorities, the media in politics, and the ongoing political and economic reform process.  All topics will be addressed from a theoretical and comparative perspective.

Assignments

1.    Quizzes: 15%

2.    Midterm Exam #1: 20%

3.    Midterm Exam #2: 25% (Students have the option of writing a 10-page research paper in lieu of an exam

4.    Final Exam: 40%

Texts

1. Andrew Gordon, Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present. Oxford University Press, 2008 (2nd edition).

2. Frances Rosenbluth and Michael Thies, Japan Transformed: Political Change and Economic Structuring (Princeton University Press, 2010)

3. Robin LeBlanc, Bicycle Citizens: The Political World of the Japanese Housewife. University of California Press, 1999.

4. Jacob M. Schlesinger, Shadow Shoguns: The Rise and Fall of Japan’s Postwar Political Machine. Sanford University Press, 1999.

5. Course reading packet.

GOV 365L • Political Economy Of Asia

38790 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm JES A203A
(also listed as ANS 361 )
show description

 This intensive reading and writing course explores the political economies of East Asia—by all accounts the world’s most economically dynamic region. With an emphasis on Japan, China, South Korea and Taiwan, we focus on a number of themes that have intrigued both scholars and policymakers over the years: the reasons for the region’s “miraculous” GDP growth rates; the notion of the “developmental state” and the role of industrial policy in economic development; the nature of government-business relationships; industrial structure (chaebol, keiretsu, Chinese State-Owned Enterprises); the experiences of East Asian consumers and workers; the business community’s contributions to the development of East Asian welfare states; and the reactions (both positive and negative) of East Asian political economies to the pressures of globalization.  In addition to examining these themes from theoretical, comparative, and historical perspectives, the course introduces students to political-economic themes and concepts that will benefit them in their reading of current events in global economics and finance. 

Individual classes will alternate between lectures and seminar-style sessions based on discussions of assigned readings. Some knowledge of East Asia and or comparative politics/political economy is recommended but not required.

This course has a writing flag.

Course Requirements

  1. Attendance and participation in class discussions:       15%
  2. Two take-home midterm exams (5 pages each):          20%
  3. Research paper (approx.  4,500 words) in 2 drafts:       40%
  4. Final exam:                                     25%

Primary course texts:

  1. Chalmers Johnson, MITI and the Japanese Miracle (1982)
  2. Meredith Woo-Cumings, ed., The Developmental State (1999)
  3. Barry Naughton, The Chinese Economy: Transition and Growth (2007)
  4. Stephan Haggard, The Political Economy of the Asian Financial Crisis (2002)
  5. A packet of book chapters, government reports and journal articles will be available for purchase at the beginning of the semester.

 

GOV 365L • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

38795 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 203
(also listed as ANS 361 )
show description

Course Description:  Toward the end of the 20th century, pundits looked to the spectacular economic growth of East and Southeast Asia and predicted that the 21st century would be the “Pacific Century”.  Although analysts have been far less optimistic about the economic and political future of the region following the 1997 financial crisis, most nevertheless agree that the region has the most growth potential of any other region in the world.  It is also home to some of the globe’s most dangerous “hot spots”: North Korea’s ongoing nuclear threat, tensions in the Taiwan Straits, and, more recently, escalating tensions between Japan and China.This upper division undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to some of the basic themes of the post-Cold War international relations of East and Southeast Asia.  In addition to tracking current events in the region, we will explore basic theoretical approaches to international relations, “Great Power” (China, Japan and the United States) contributions and challenges to the military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of economic globalization and institutional integration in the Asia-Pacific, and the nature of and potential solutions to the North Korean security threat.      Prerequisites:  Six hours of Government are recommended but not required. No prior knowledge of the region is required.        Requirements:1.    Quizzes on readings: 10%2.    First mid-term exam: 20%3.    Second mid-term exam or short research paper:  30%4.    Final exam: 40%Texts:1.    Susan L. Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower (Oxford University Press, 2008)2.    David Shambaugh and Michael Yahuda, eds., International Relations of Asia (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008).3.    Joseph E. Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents (W.W. Norton & Co., 2002).    A selection of book chapters and journal articles will also be made available to students online.

GOV 314 • Intro To Politics In East Asia

38823 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 201
(also listed as ANS 301M )
show description

 Instructors:           

Professor William Hurst (Government)

Professor Patricia Maclachlan (Government)

Overview: 

As President Obama recently reminded us, America’s future lies with the Pacific as well as the Atlantic. Yet, most students have relatively little exposure to or understanding of East Asian politics. The purpose of this lower-division class is to introduce students to the politics and political systems of key countries in East and Southeast Asia. The course has no prerequisites and does not assume any prior knowledge of either political science or the region.

We will cover China and Japan in the most depth, with shorter units on Korea, Taiwan, and Southeast Asia. We will address the history, political structures, social issues, and economic conditions of each country; many of our topics will be explored from a comparative perspective and with reference to political science theories. By the end of the semester, students will be prepared to take more advanced courses on East and/or Southeast Asian politics.  Even if students choose not to continue with their studies of East and Southeast Asia, this class will provide them with the background knowledge to understand political, economic and social developments in this diverse and critically important part of the world.

Texts:

  1. William Joseph, ed., Politics in China: An Introduction (Oxford 2010)
  2. Bruce Cumings, Korea’s Place in the Sun, updated edition (Norton, 2005)
  3. Frances McCall Rosenbluth and Michael F. Thies, Japan Transformed: Political Change and Economic Restructuring (Princeton, 2010)

 A reading packet will also be available for purchase at the beginning of the semester

Requirements:

  1. Map tests (one each for China/Taiwan, Japan/Korea, SE Asia): 10% total
  2. Quizzes on readings: 15% total
  3. 2 midterm exams: 40% total(A short writing assignment may be substituted for one of the exams)
  4. Final exam: 35%

 

GOV 321M • Politics In Japan

38840 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 201
(also listed as ANS 321M )
show description

Description:

This survey course introduces students to the institutions and processes of postwar Japanese domestic politics from historical and comparative perspectives.  In addition to exploring such topics as the long-term political impact of the Allied Occupation (1945-52), the structure of the political party and policymaking systems, the government-business relationship, and the development of civil society, we will address questions that have long intrigued analysts of Japanese politics: Why was Japan so receptive to the introduction of democratic institutions after World War II?  How can we explain its postwar economic “miracle”?; Why has Japan lost its status as the world’s second largest economy?; and Why is the country having so much trouble implementing political and economic reform?

 

Prerequisites:

            Coursework in political science and/or Japan Studies is recommended but not required.

 

Required Readings: (available for purchase at the University Co-op)

1. Andrew Gordon, Modern History of Japan, 2nd ed. 

            2. Francis McCall Rosenbluth and Michael Thies, Japan Transformed, 2010.          3. Robert Pekkanen, Japan’s Dual Society, 2006.

                        4. Robin LeBlanc, Bicycle Citizens, 1999.

                        5. Jacob M. Schlesinger, Shadow Shoguns, 1999.

 

            Additional readings will be posted on the Blackboard site for this course.

 

Assignments:

  1. Quizzes on readings: 15%
  2. Midterm exam #1: 20%
  3. Midterm exam #2: 25% (Students may instead write a short research paper on a topic of their choice.)
  4. Final exam (Tuesday, May 17, 9:00-12:00): 40%

 

GOV 365L • Japanese Foreign Policy

38635 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 203
(also listed as ANS 361 )
show description

Description: This course is designed to introduce upper level undergraduates to the foreign and domestic determinants of Japanese foreign policy-making and international relations from the beginning of the modern era (1868) to the present.  We will address a wide range of issues, including the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese wars, the Pacific War, the Japanese foreign policy-making process, postwar trade and security relations between Japan and the U.S.,  Japan’s role in Asia, and the implications of the ongoing nuclear crisis in North Korea for Japan.Prerequisite:  Six semester hours of lower-division government.  Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit.

Grading/Requirements:
Short policy paper (5 pgs)                 15%
Research paper proposal (2 pgs)  10
Research paper (15 pgs)                    40%

Texts/Readings:
Kenneth B. Pyle, The Japan Question: Power and Purpose in a New Era.
Reading packet (available at beginning of semester)

 

GOV 365L • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

38640 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 203
(also listed as ANS 361 )
show description

Description: This introductory course will explore the postwar international relations of East and Southeast Asia.  Particular attention will be devoted to postwar economic and security issues, the changing political landscape of the post-Cold War period, and to the development and functions of regional institutions.  The course will be instructed around four themes: 1) the impact of "Asian values" on the international relations of the region 2) the definition of "security" in the post-Cold War era 3) the juxtaposition of domestic and international politics in Asia 4) the opportunitiesand constraints confronting regional institution-building and integration.

Grading/Requirements:
Brief writing assignment (max. 8 pages): 30%
Midterm examination: 25%; Final examination: 40%
Attendance: 5%

Textbooks
TBA

 

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