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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Kurt Weyland

Professor Ph.D., Stanford University

Professor, Lozano Long Professor of Latin American Politics
Kurt Weyland

Contact

Biography

Professor Weyland's research interests focus on democratization, market reform, social policy and policy diffusion, and populism in Latin America. He has drawn on a range of theoretical and methodological approaches, including insights from cognitive psychology, and has done extensive field research in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Peru, and Venezuela. After receiving a Staatsexamen from Johannes-Gutenberg Universitat Mainz in 1984, a M.A. from UT in 1986, and a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1991, he taught for ten years at Vanderbilt University. He has received research support from the SSRC and NEH and was a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC, in 1999/2000 and at the Kellogg Institute, University of Notre Dame, in 2004/05. From 2001 to 2004, he served as Associate Editor of the Latin American Research Review.

He is the author of Democracy without Equity: Failures of Reform in Brazil (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996), The Politics of Market Reform in Fragile Democracies: Argentina, Brazil, Peru, and Venezuela (Princeton University Press, 2002), several book chapters, and many articles in journals such as World Politics, Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Latin American Research Review, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Democracy, Foreign Affairs, and Political Research Quarterly. He has also edited a volume, Learning from Foreign Models in Latin American Policy Reform (Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2004). His latest book, Bounded Rationality and Policy Diffusion: Social Sector Reform in Latin America, was published by Princeton University Press in July of 2007.

Interests

Democratization, market reform, social policy and policy diffusion, and populism in Latin America

GOV 390K • Compar Study Of Pol Systems

39100 • Fall 2014
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

 

This course will provide a very wide-ranging, theoretically and methodologically pluralistic introduction to the field of Comparative Politics. After a brief discussion of the great variety of methodological approaches that are applied in our sub- field, we will systematically compare and assess the major theoretical approaches (“paradigms”) that Comparativists have drawn on, especially “culturalism,” [neo-]Marxism, historical institutionalism, and rational choice (including rational-choice institutionalism). Thereafter, we will assess how these theoretical approaches work by discussing a number of important substantive issues and topics, especially the political economy of the First World and Third World; revolution; democratization; parties and voting; interest groups and social movements; and nationalism and ethnic conflict. The readings on these substantive topics will reflect the diverse theoretical and methodological approaches discussed before.

 

Grading:

 

3    2-3 pp. discussion papers to be distributed to all participants and to be presented and discussed in class

1    5 pp. essay

1    10 pp. essay or research design

1     final exam

lots of participation in class discussion

 

Texts (preliminary listing; books marked with “?” may be replaced if my search for a good substitute ends up successful):

 

Ronald Inglehart and Christian Welzel, Modernization, Cultural Change, and Democracy (Cambridge UP, 2005)  ?

Robert Bates, Markets and States in Tropical Africa (U. California Pr., 1984)  ?

Mark Lichbach & Alan Zuckerman, eds., Comparative Politics, 2nd ed.(Cambridge UP, 2009)

Dietrich Rueschemeyer, Evelyne Huber Stephens & John Stephens, Capitalist Development and Democracy (U. Chicago Pr., 1992)     ?

Theda Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions (Cambridge UP, 1979)

Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter, Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies (Johns Hopkins UP, 1986)

Sidney Tarrow, Power in Movement, 3rd ed. (Cambridge UP, 2010)  

David Laitin, Nations, States, and Violence (Oxford UP, 2007)   ?

 

Extensive electronic reserves of journal articles and book chapters.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39042 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Course description:

 This course will compare the U.S. political system with that of Great Britain, Sweden, Russia/Soviet Union, and Mexico in order to analyze how different models of democracy and different types of political regime operate in practice and how they have changed over time. Specifically, we will examine liberal democracy (the case of the U.S.); social democracy (Sweden); the move from social to liberal democracy (Great Britain); Communist totalitarianism (Soviet Union); authoritarian rule (Mexico); and the democratization of the latter two countries, as well as Russia’s slide back toward authoritarian rule. In this way, the course will examine political decision-making in different institutional settings and analyze how these political differences affect the lives of common citizens.

 

 Grading:

 3 examinations + 3 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance norm. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty rules.

 

 Texts:

David Held, Models of Democracy, 3rd ed. (Polity Press, 2006)

 

Benjamin Ginsberg & Martin Shefter, Politics by Other Means, 3rd ed. (W.W. Norton, 2002)

 

CQ Press Custom Editions, Selections from Politics in Europe - Custom Edition (Weyland) (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2012). In lieu of this special custom edition for our course, students can also use the original huge textbook (which features lots of additional materials that we will not use: M. Donald Hancock et al., eds., Politics in Europe: An Introduction to the Politics of the United Kingdom, ... Sweden, Russia,.. 5th ed. (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2011/12).

 

Daniel Levy & Kathleen Bruhn, Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development, 2nd ed. (Univ. California Press, 2006).

 

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

 

GOV 337M • Intnatl Politics Latin Amer

39150 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

 Course description:

 This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging, theoretically informed perspective. The first week will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has international economic integration (e.g., NAFTA) changed the region’s insertion into the international economic and political system? Finally, the last third of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?

 

 Grading:

 1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

 

 Texts:

 

Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, paperback edition, 2012.

 

Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.

 

Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

 

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

 

The readings will amount to about 100 pp. of material per week.

GOV 390K • Compar Study Of Pol Systems

39405 • Fall 2013
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

Course Description

This course will provide a very wide-ranging, theoretically and methodologically pluralistic introduction to the field of Comparative Politics. After a brief discussion of the great variety of methodological approaches that are applied in our sub- field, we will systematically compare and assess the major theoretical approaches (“paradigms”) that Comparativists have drawn on, especially “culturalism,” [neo-]Marxism, historical institutionalism, and rational choice (including rational-choice institutionalism). Thereafter, we will assess how these theoretical approaches work by discussing a number of important substantive issues and topics, especially the political economy of the First World and Third World; revolution; democratization; parties and voting; interest groups and social movements; and nationalism and ethnic conflict. The readings on these substantive topics will reflect the diverse theoretical and methodological approaches discussed before.

 

Grading Policy

3    2-3 pp. discussion papers to be distributed to all participants and to be presented and discussed in class

1    5 pp. essay

1    10 pp. essay or research design

1     final exam

lots of participation in class discussion

 

Texts (preliminary listing; books marked with “?” may be replaced if my search for a good substitute ends up successful)

 

Ronald Inglehart and Christian Welzel, Modernization, Cultural Change, and Democracy (Cambridge UP, 2005)  ?

Robert Bates, Markets and States in Tropical Africa (U. California Pr., 1984)  ?

Mark Lichbach & Alan Zuckerman, eds., Comparative Politics, 2nd ed.(Cambridge UP, 2009)

Dietrich Rueschemeyer, Evelyne Huber Stephens & John Stephens, Capitalist Development and Democracy (U. Chicago Pr., 1992)     ?

Theda Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions (Cambridge UP, 1979)

Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter, Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies (Johns Hopkins UP, 1986)

Sidney Tarrow, Power in Movement, 3rd ed. (Cambridge UP, 2010)  

David Laitin, Nations, States, and Violence (Oxford UP, 2007)   ? 

Extensive electronic reserves of journal articles and book chapters.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38740 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm BEL 328
show description

Course Description:

This course will compare the U.S. political system with that of Great Britain, Sweden, Russia/Soviet Union, and Mexico in order to analyze how different models of democracy and different types of political regime operate in practice and how they change over time. Specifically, we will examine liberal democracy (the case of the U.S.); social democracy (Sweden); the move from social to liberal democracy (Great Britain); Communist totalitarianism (Soviet Union); authoritarian rule (Mexico); and the democratization of the latter two countries, as well as Russia’s slide back toward authoritarian rule. In this way, the course will examine political decision-making in different institutional settings and analyze how these political differences affect the lives of common citizens.

 

Grading Policy:

3 examinations + 3 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance norm. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty rules.

 

Texts:

David Held, Models of Democracy, 3rd ed. (Polity Press, 2006)

Benjamin Ginsberg & Martin Shefter, Politics by Other Means, 3rd ed. (W.W. Norton, 2002)

CQ Press Custom Editions, Selections from Politics in Europe - Custom Edition (Weyland) (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2012). In lieu of this special custom edition for our course, students can also use the original huge textbook (which features lots of additional materials that we will not use: M. Donald Hancock et al., eds., Politics in Europe: An Introduction to the Politics of the United Kingdom, ... Sweden, Russia,.. 5th ed. (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2011/12).

Daniel Levy & Kathleen Bruhn, Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development, 2nd ed. (Univ. California Press, 2006).

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters 

GOV 337M • Intnatl Politics Of Latin Amer

38830 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

Course Description:

This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging, theoretically informed perspective. The first week will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has international economic integration (e.g.,, NAFTA) changed the region’s insertion into the international economy and political system? Finally, the last third of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?

 

Grading Policy:

1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

 

Texts:

Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, paperback edition, 2012.

Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.

Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

The readings will amount to about 100 pp. of material per wee

GOV 390K • Compar Study Of Pol Systems

38955 • Fall 2012
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

Course Description

This course will provide a very wide-ranging, theoretically and methodologically pluralistic introduction to the field of Comparative Politics. After a brief discussion of the great variety of methodological approaches that are applied in our sub- field, we will systematically compare and assess the major theoretical approaches (“paradigms”) that Comparativists have drawn on, especially “culturalism,” [neo-]Marxism, historical institutionalism, and rational choice (including rational-choice institutionalism). Thereafter, we will discuss a number of important substantive issues and topics, especially the political economy of the First World and Third World; revolution; democratization; parties and voting; interest groups and social movements; and nationalism and ethnic conflict. The readings on these substantive topics will reflect the diverse theoretical and methodological approaches discussed before.

 

Grading Policy

3    2-3 pp. discussion papers to be distributed to all participants and to be presented and discussed in class

1    5 pp. essay

1    10 pp. essay or research design

1     final exam

Lots of participation in class discussion

 

Texts (subject to change)

Ronald Inglehart and Christian Welzel, Modernization, Cultural Change, and Democracy (Cambridge UP, 2005)  

Robert Bates, Markets and States in Tropical Africa (U. California Pr., 1984)

Mark Lichbach & Alan Zuckerman, eds., Comparative Politics, 2nd ed. (Cambridge UP, 2009)  

Dietrich Rueschemeyer, Evelyne Huber Stephens & John Stephens, Capitalist Development and Democracy (U. Chicago Pr., 1992)     

Theda Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions (Cambridge UP, 1979)

Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter, Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies (Johns Hopkins UP, 1986)

Sidney Tarrow, Power in Movement, 3rd ed. (Cambridge UP, 2010)    

David Laitin, Nations, States, and Violence (Oxford UP, 2007)    

Extensive electronic reserves [and, perhaps, significant course-pack] of journal articles and book chapters.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38570 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JGB 2.324
show description

Course description:

This course will compare the U.S. political system with that of Great Britain, Sweden, Russia/Soviet Union, and Mexico in order to analyze how different models of democracy and different types of political regime operate in practice and how they change over time. Specifically, we will examine liberal democracy (the case of the U.S.); social democracy (Sweden); the move from social to liberal democracy (Great Britain); Communist totalitarianism (Soviet Union); authoritarian rule (Mexico); and the democratization of the latter two countries. In this way, the course will examine political decision-making in different institutional settings and analyze how these political differences affect the lives of common citizens.

Grading:

3 examinations + 3 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

Texts:

David Held, Models of Democracy, 3rd ed. (Polity Press, 2006)

Benjamin Ginsberg & Martin Shefter, Politics by Other Means, 3rd ed. (W.W. Norton, 2002)

M. Donald Hancock et al., eds., Politics in Europe: An Introduction to the Politics of the United Kingdom, ... Sweden, Russia,.. 5th ed. (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2011/12).

Daniel Levy & Kathleen Bruhn, Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development, 2nd ed. (Univ. California Press, 2006).

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

GOV 337M • Intnatl Politics Of Latin Amer

38675 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm WAG 214
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

Course description:

This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging perspective. The first week will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has the wave of market-oriented reforms changed the region’s insertion into the international economy and political system? Finally, the last third of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?

Grading:

1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

Texts:

Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, 2008.

Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.

Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

The readings will amount to 80-100 pp. of material per week.

GOV 390K • Compar Study Of Pol Systems

38950 • Fall 2011
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

This course will provide a very wide-ranging, theoretically and methodologically pluralistic introduction to the field of Comparative Politics. After a brief discussion of the great variety of methods that are applied in the field, we will compare and assess the major theoretical approaches (“paradigms”) that Comparativists have drawn on, especially “culturalism,” Marxism, historical institutionalism, and rational choice (including rational-choice institutionalism). Thereafter, we will discuss a number of important substantive issues and topics, especially the political economy of the First World and Third World; revolution; democratization; parties and voting; interest groups and social movements; and nationalism and ethnic conflict. The readings on these substantive topics will reflect the diverse theoretical and methodological approaches discussed before.

 

 

Grading:3 2-3 pp. discussion papers to be distributed to all participants and to be presented and discussed in class1 5 pp. essay1 10 pp. essay or research design1   final exam  lots of participation in class discussion

 

 

Texts (preliminary listing; books marked with “?” may be replaced if my search for a good substitute ends up being successful):Ronald Inglehart and Christian Welzel, Modernization, Cultural Change, and Democracy (Cambridge UP, 2005) ?Robert Bates, Markets and States in Tropical Africa (U. California Pr., 1984)Mark Lichbach & Alan Zuckerman, eds., Comparative Politics, 2nd ed. (Cambridge UP, 2009)  ?Dietrich Rueschemeyer, Evelyne Huber Stephens & John Stephens, Capitalist Development and Democracy (U. Chicago Pr., 1992)     ?Theda Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions (Cambridge UP, 1979)Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter, Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies (Johns Hopkins UP, 1986)Sidney Tarrow, Power in Movement, 3rd ed. (Cambridge UP, 2010)   David Laitin, Nations, States, and Violence (Oxford UP, 2007)   ?Extensive electronic reserves and significant coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38800 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JGB 2.324
show description

GOV 312L: The U.S. in Comparative Perspective

Course description:

This course will compare the U.S. political system with that of Great Britain, Sweden, Russia/Soviet Union, and Mexico in order to analyze how different models of democracy and different types of political regime operate in practice and how they change over time. Specifically, we will examine liberal democracy (the case of the U.S.); social democracy (Sweden); the move from social to liberal democracy (Great Britain); Communist totalitarianism (Soviet Union); authoritarian rule (Mexico); and the democratization of the latter two countries. In this way, the course will examine political decision-making in different institutional settings and analyze how these political differences affect the lives of common citizens.

Grading:

3 examinations + 3 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

Texts:

David Held, Models of Democracy, 3rd ed. (Polity Press, 2006)

Benjamin Ginsberg & Martin Shefter, Politics by Other Means, 3rd ed. (W.W. Norton, 2002)

M. Donald Hancock et al., eds., Politics in Europe: An Introduction to the Politics of the United Kingdom, ... Sweden, Russia,.. 4th ed. (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2007).

Daniel Levy & Kathleen Bruhn, Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development, 2nd ed. (Univ. California Press, 2006).

 

Course pack with Xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

GOV 337M • Intnatl Politics Of Latin Amer

38900 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 134
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

Course description:This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging perspective. The first week will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has the wave of market-oriented reforms changed the region’s insertion into the international economy and political system? Finally, the last third of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?Grading:1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.Texts:Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, 2008.Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008. Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chaptersThe readings will amount to 80-100 pp. of material per week.

GOV 390K • Compar Study Of Pol Systems

38845 • Fall 2010
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

Course Description: This course will provide a very wide-ranging, theoretically and methodologically pluralistic introduction to the field of Comparative Politics. After a brief discussion of the great variety of methods that are applied in the field, we will compare and assess the major theoretical approaches (“paradigms”) that Comparativists have drawn on, especially “culturalism,” Marxism, historical institutionalism, and rational choice (including rational-choice institutionalism). Thereafter, we will discuss a number of important substantive issues and topics, especially the political economy of the First World and Third World; revolution; democratization; parties and voting; and interest groups and social movements; and nationalism and ethnic conflict. The readings on these substantive topics will reflect the diverse theoretical and methodological approaches discussed before.

Grading Policy:

3 2-3 pp. discussion papers to be distributed to all participants and to be presented and discussed in class
1 5 pp. essay
1 10 pp. essay or research design
1   final exam
lots of participation in class discussion

Textbooks (preliminary listing; books marked with “?” may be replaced if my search for a good substitute ends up being successful):

Ronald Inglehart and Christian Welzel, Modernization, Cultural Change, and Democracy (Cambridge UP, 2005) ?
Robert Bates, Markets and States in Tropical Africa (U. California Pr., 1984)
Mark Lichbach & Alan Zuckerman, eds., Comparative Politics, 2nd ed. (Cambridge UP, 2009)  ?
Dietrich Rueschemeyer, Evelyne Huber Stephens & John Stephens, Capitalist Development and Democracy (U. Chicago Pr., 1992)     ?
Theda Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions (Cambridge UP, 1979)
Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter, Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies (Johns Hopkins UP, 1986)
Sidney Tarrow, Power in Movement, 2nd ed. (Cambridge UP, 1998) [NOTE: 3rd ed. is in the works but may not be published/available in time]   ?
David Laitin, Nations, States, and Violence (Oxford UP, 2007)   ?

Extensive electronic reserves and significant coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39085 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JGB 2.324
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

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