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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Danilo Antonio Contreras

B.A., Georgetown University (2005)

Graduate Student
Danilo Antonio Contreras

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Biography

Danilo Antonio Contreras is a PhD candidate in the Department of Government and is currently the Gaius Charles Bolin Fellow in Political Science at Williams College. He specializes in comparative ethnoracial politics in Latin America. Danilo holds a B.A. in Government and Spanish from Georgetown University. Prior to entering the graduate program, he worked in the Americas Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington D.C.

Broadly, his research aims to understand the ways in which individuals in Latin America manifest their ethnoracial identity politically and how unequal structural conditions, state institutions, and migration patterns mediate their behavior. He is particularly interested in studying those interactions in nations with significant Afro-descendant populations and among Afro-Latinos in the United States. Danilo's dissertation examines the effect of perceived ethnoracial identity on candidate evaluation in the Dominican Republic. Based primarily on an original survey experiment conducted in Santo Domingo, DR, he develops an explanation for the low salience of ethnoracial identity in elections in Latin America. A related article is forthcoming in the Latin American Research Review.

Danilo's research has been supported by the Tinker Foundation, EDGE-SBE fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the U.S Department of Education’s Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship, the IC2 Institute at the University of Texas' McCombs School of Business, and by the Lozano Long Institute for Latin American Studies and fellowships from the Department of Government at UT.  

 

 

 

Interests

race and ethnic politics in Latin America; political behavior; Dominico-Haitian relations; migration and citizenship; mixed methods
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