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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Statewide poll finds Texans worried, McCain and Cornyn enjoying leads

Posted: September 4, 2008

The survey is the first of a pilot effort to establish a public archive of statewide data on public opinion in Texas that can be used for instruction and research.  The survey, which sampled 800 Texans statewide between July 18-30, 2008, found them focused on economic concerns and expressing negative views about the country's direction.

When asked whether the country was moving in the right direction or wrong direction, 67% answered that the country was moving in the wrong direction, with only 20% seeing the country moving in the right direction. Forty-eight percent of the respondents said they were worse off economically than they were one year ago, versus 17% who said they were better off and about 34% who said their economic situation was about the same.

With the general election still three and a half months distant at the time the survey was administered, Republicans enjoyed an advantage in the most prominent races at the top of the ballot. In the presidential race, among registered voters, John McCain led Barack Obama 42 to 33%, with Libertarian Bob Barr at just under 5%. In the race for the US Senate seat , incumbent Republican John Cornyn led challenger State Representative Rick Noriega 44 to 31%. A large number of voters, just under 25%, expressed no preference in the Senate race, with 17% undecided in the presidential match up.

The poll is designed to provide both educational and research resources to students, educators, and the general public. The survey data is and will continue to be made available to the public and to researchers. Graphs and charts are designed to make data not only available but accessible to everyone interested in Texas politics and government. The project is being directed by Daron Shaw and James Henson.

Explore graphics and complete data from the survey at the Texas Politics website. An SPSS file of results, comprehensive results, and crosstabs can be downloaded at the notes and files page at the site.

Professor Shaw’s Department profile
James Henson’s Department Profile

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