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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Spring 2010

HIS 382L • GENDER, EMPIRE, & NATIONALISM

Unique Days Time Location Instructor
39920
-

CHARUMBIRA

Course Description

This is an introductory reading course aimed at grounding students in the historiography of gender, empire and nation. Utilizing Africa as case study, we will examine the gendered rise and fall of empires and nations in the nineteenth century asking questions such as: How did women and men define nation and empire in the colonies and the metropolis? Why were those definitions so often hotly contested in the periphery and center of empire? To illuminate those definitions and contestations, we will focus on the British empire as imperial prototype and hold it up and against the other three major European nations/empires that had a stake in Africa, namely: France, Portugal, and Germany. By focusing on the four empires, it forces us to move beyond the comfort zone of the Anglicized empire to understanding the historical forces at play in other geographic locations around the world. To that end, students from all disciplines interested in issues of gender, empire, and nation in other time parts of the world ? and time periods ? are welcome to the course. Readings will likely include some of the following texts: Robin Winks, ed., The Oxford History of the British Empire, Volume V: Historiography; Philipa Levine, ed., Gender and Empire, Nupur Chaudhuri and Margaret Strobel, eds., Western Women and Imperialism: Complicity and Resistance; Lora Wildenthal, German Women for Empire, 1884-1945; Franz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth; Edward Said, Culture and Imperialism; Chandra Talpade Mohanty, ?Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses;? Antoinette Burton, Burdens of History: British Feminists, Indian Women, and Imperial Culture; Oyeronke Oyewumi, ?Colonizing Bodies and Minds: Gender and Colonialism;? Toyin Falola, Nationalism and African Intellectuals.

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