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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

IHS Workshop: "Nineteenth-Century Food Systems: A Search for the Invisible Hand" by Dr. Robyn Metcalfe, UT Austin

Mon, March 5, 2012 • 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM • GAR 4.100

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Dr. Robyn Metcalfe received her Ph.D. in Modern European History from Boston University, where she taught Agricultural History, Modern European History, European Cultural History, and Food History. Her article "Nineteenth Century American Livestock Improvers and the Market,” (October 2007) appears in the Journal of the History Society. She has presented several papers about nineteenth-century London Meat Markets both in the U.S and abroad. In February 2011, she chaired a conference, "Food and the City," sponsored by the Boston University History Department. She joins the IHS this year as an Invited Research Fellow. Her new book, "Cattle, Commerce, and the City," will be published in April. Next fall, she will be teaching "Modern European Food History" and "Modern European Cities" at UT Austin. In addition to her academic work, she founded and managed a farm for ten years that conserved heritage livestock breeds, holds a Certificate from Cordon Bleu, and is the current president of the Gloucestershire Old Spots Pigs Association of America. Currently, she is building a database of local Austin farmers and food artisans for an online enterprise, Realtimefarms and is the faculty advisor for the UT Food Studies Project student group. You can follow her on Twitter, and she'll be launching her new web site (www.FOODTRACKS.net) on March 30th.

Responder:
Dr. Carol H. MacKay, University Distinguished Teaching Professor, UT Austin
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/english/faculty/mackaych

Free and open to the public. RSVP required. To RSVP and receive a copy of the pre-circulated paper, please email Courtney Meador by 9 a.m., Friday, March 2.

Sponsored by: Institute for Historical Studies, Center for European Studies, Department of History


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