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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

IHS Workshop: "Curricular Reform in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Ulisse Aldrovandi and the University of Bologna" by David Lines, University of Warwick UK

Mon, October 24, 2011 • 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM • GAR 4.100

Dr. David Lines (Ph.D, History, Harvard University, 1997) is Associate Professor in the Department of Italian and Centre for the Study of the Renaissance at the University of Warwick. 


He is focused on Renaissance classical scholarship and intellectual history. Specifically he has explored the reception of Aristotle’s works and the contexts in which these were taught, especially in the case of natural and moral philosophy. In his 2002 book Aristotle’s ‘Ethics’ in the Italian Renaissance (ca. 1300–1650): The Universities and the Problem of Moral Education he examined the interplay of ideals and practices of moral education— especially in Padua, Bologna, Florence–Pisa, and Rome—through a study of Latin commentaries on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, the standard university textbook for moral philosophy. He has also published on the development of Aristotelianism in France, Germany, Spain, the Low Countries, and Switzerland. 

His current research focuses on two strands: Renaissance Bologna, particularly the ties between the University of Bologna and other Bolognese contexts of learning; and the rise of vernacular philosophy in the Renaissance (see the new AHRC-funded research project on 'Vernacular Aristotelianism in Renaissance Italy, c. 1400-c. 1650'). 

Dr. Line's faculty home page.

Responder:
Dr. Bruce J. Hunt, Associate Professor of History, UT Austin

Free and open to the public. RSVP required. To RSVP and receive a copy of the pre-circulated paper, please email Courtney Meador by 9 a.m., Friday, October 21.

Sponsored by: Institute for Historical Studies, Center for European Studies, Department of History


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