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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Talk: "A Tide of Bodies: Recasting the Specter of Trauma, Disease, and Suffering in the Gendered Landscape of Atlantic World Slavery"

Thu, November 10, 2011 • 12:30 PM • GAR 1.102

Photo of Prof. Sowande' Mustakeem

Photo of Prof. Sowande' Mustakeem

The Department of History's Graduate Symposium on Gender, History, and Sexuality presents

"A Tide of Bodies: Recasting the Specter of Trauma, Disease, and Suffering in the Gendered Landscape of Atlantic World Slavery"

A talk by
Dr. Sowande' Mustakeem
Assistant Professor of History and African and African American Studies Program
Washington University in St. Louis

The History department's Graduate Symposium on Gender, History, and Sexuality presents is honored to present a talk by "Sexuality and Slavery" conference panelist Dr. Sowande' Mustakeem, entitled, "A Tide of Bodies: Recasting the Specter of Trauma, Disease, and Suffering in the Gendered Landscape of Atlantic World Slavery" on Thursday, November 10th, from 12:30-2:30 p.m., in Garrison 1.102.

Professor Mustakeem's research interests include: Middle passage studies; Gender and slavery in the Americas; Diaspora/black atlantic studies; Medical history; Violence; Maritime history; Sexuality; and Historical memory. A brief description of her project: The experiences of captivity that bondpeople endured during the era of slavery differed across geographical and temporal boundaries.  While studies of plantation slavery continue to undergo considerable shifts within current historiography, only gradual attention has been paid to the Middle Passage in its connection to Atlantic world slavery.  Recognizing that slave ships often served as mobile icons effectively bridging people, ports, and revolutionary ideas across the Americas, this talk turns significant attention towards the lives of bondpeople.  Moving beyond the useful although static framework of statistical queries, this talk draws together overlooked factors of trauma, disease, and suffering as manifested aboard ship and out at sea.  In so doing it not only sets out to reconstruct aspects of the shipboard experience, but it essentially interrogates the meaning of these transported black bodies?  Many of us can agree that African people were commodified on both sides of the Atlantic to appease and set into motion the process of the global slave market, however we have to delve deeper to grapple with the question – how did bondpeople physically and mentally attempt to cope with the shock of enslavement. How/can their bodies become human archives for us to grapple with the layered meanings of bondage within the landscape of maritime slavery? More importantly, where, how and do we account for the variations of these black bodies transported and consequentially imported for the financial needs and desires of others?

If you are interested in attending, please RSVP to Alley and Valerie by next Monday, November 7th so we can accommodate meal preferences. We will be having Whole Foods boxed lunches (please specify your selection in your RSVP): (1) Smoked Turkey and Provolone, (2) Black Forest Ham and Swiss, or (3) Eggplant Milanese with Chimichurri, Lettuce and Tomato. ***If you are gluten-free, please also inform us well.

The Symposium on Gender, History, and Sexuality has been a fixture in Department of History since 2001, offering a forum for graduate students and faculty to present papers and works-in-progress for discussion in a relaxed and collegial atmosphere.

Free and open to the public. For more information, please contact Program Coordinators Valerie Ann Martinez (email) and Allison Schottenstein (email)

 

Sponsored by: The History Department's Graduate Symposium on Gender, History, and Sexuality


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