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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Alberto A. Martínez

Associate Professor Ph.D., 2001, University of Minnesota

Alberto A. Martínez

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-9426
  • Office: GAR 0.138
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: MW 1-2 p.m. & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Alberto Martinez is originally from San Juan, Puerto Rico. Most recently, he is the author of The Cult of Pythagoras (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012), on the evolution of myths in the history of mathematics. He is also the author of Science Secrets: The Truth About Darwin's Finches, Einstein's Wife, and Other Myths (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011). And previously, he published Kinematics: The Lost Origins of Einstein's Relativity (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), and Negative Math (Princeton University Press, 2005). He has also published articles in several journals and periodicals including The American Journal of Physics, Archive for History of Exact Sciences, Physics in Perspective, The American Mathematical Monthly, School Science Review, Physics World, and Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics.

Research interests

History of physics, especially the origins of Einstein's special theory of relativity, history of mathematics.

Courses taught

HIS329U Perspectives on Science and Math, HIS322M History of Modern Science, TC302/UGS302 Scientists and Religion in History, HIS350L Einstein in an Age of Conflicts, HIS366N Biology, Behavior and Injustice, HIS380K Science and Conjectures.

Awards/Honors

Weisman Instructor in History of Science, Caltech, 2004–2005
Fellow, Dibner Institute for the History of Science and Technology, M.I.T., 2001-03
Smithsonian Fellow, National Museum of American History, 2001




HIS 350L • Einstein In Age Of Conflict

38653 • Spring 2015
Meets M 400pm-700pm GAR 2.112
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 366N • Bio, Behavior, & Injustice

38865 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 3.112
(also listed as CTI 370 )
show description

This course explores interesting episodes in the history of science, focusing on questions about what aspects of human behavior are essentially determined by biological factors rather than by experiences and society. Changing beliefs about what is natural have affected how some people are treated, so we will discuss the social consequences of such notions. The course will include the following topics: theories of race, Darwin’s works, evolution in schools and U.S. courts, American eugenics and Nazi science, differences between women and men, IQ testing, the controversy about DNA and Rosalind Franklin, studies of twins separated at birth, genetic engineering, ethical issues on cloning animals and humans, biotechnology, the immortal cells of Henrietta Lacks, designer babies, biology in forensic science. This is a lecture course, with participation encouraged.

This course fulfills a College of Liberal Arts Science Component: Alternative Science & Technology course.

Grading: First exam 20%, Midterm Exam 20%, Final Exam 30%, Quizzes 20%, Attendance 10%

Texts: Some readings are in the Course Packet, required, which will be available at Jenn’s Copy & Binding, 2518 Guadalupe St. There are no readings at the Libraries, on reserve, instead, all other readings will be available online through the UT Libraries website or on Blackboard: https://courses.utexas.edu/

Some of the readings: Francis Galton, "Comparative Worth of Races," in Hereditary Genius (1869). Charles Darwin, Descent of Man (1871), "On the Races of Man," and “Sexual Differences." Cesare Lombroso, Criminal Man (1st ed. 1876). Lombroso, The Female Offender (1895). Julien Offray de La Mettrie, Man a Machine (1748). Francis Galton, "Eugenics: Its Definition, Scope and Aims" (1904). Richard Dawkins, The Selfish Gene (1976).

 

HIS 329U • Perspectives On Science & Math

39515-39520 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAI 4.18
show description

This course explores a selection of topics and episodes in the history of science and mathematics. It has four interlocking goals: to provide an overview of the history of science and math (for general education and to better comprehend subjects that you may eventually teach); to enable you to put these historical perspectives and context to work in pedagogy; to sharpen your independence of thought; and to improve your writing skills.

 

Students will design and prepare Two 5E Lesson Plans (each having a minimum length of 1200 words). Detailed instructions will be distributed separately. You will select the subject of these lesson plans from a variety of options. Once graded, you will incorporate corrections into your lesson plan, to electronically post the revised product, which will improve your grade. There will be several quizzes and writing assignments. All students will take a Midterm Exam, designed to test the extent to which you have followed, engaged, and learned from the topics discussed in class and in the readings. Furthermore, you will have to do a Presentation of one of your lesson plans to a group of peers. (You will also write Comments on other presentations.) Finally, all students will have to take a Final Essay Exam (about 800 words) in the classroom during Finals Week.

 

NOTE: this course involves a weekly discussion session with the Teaching Assistant from the History Department. You are required to attend one such session per week, to carry out work for the course.

 

This is an upper-division history course. The assigned readings vary in length, and we encourage you to read thoughtfully rather than waste your time skimming and forgetting. Some of the readings will be from primary sources (such as writings by prominent scientists), other readings will be from secondary texts (such as by historians). You will also be required to do additional research and reading for the lesson plans; so keep this in mind when budgeting your time for this course. Classes will be conducted as a mixture of lecture and discussion. Accordingly, attendance and participation are important, as you can also see from the grading distributions below. Attendance will be taken daily, and will be used in evaluating your overall grade for class participation. You are welcome to speak up at any time.

 

Texts:

There is a required Course Packet, available for purchase only at Jenn’s Copies on 2518 Guadalupe at Dean Keaton. Also, additional readings are available online, on Blackboard.

 

Grading:

This course is listed as having a Substantial Writing Component; therefore, much of your final grade will be based on written expression. The grading breakdown is as follows:

Class participation 10% (for speaking; minus absences, see below)

Quizzes and Assignments    16%

First Lesson Plan    16%

Midterm Exam    16% (in class)

Second Lesson Plan 16%

Presentation    10%

Final Exam    16% (in a classroom, during Finals Week)

HIS 329U • Perspectives On Science & Math

39525-39530 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAI 4.18
show description

This course explores a selection of topics and episodes in the history of science and mathematics. It has four interlocking goals: to provide an overview of the history of science and math (for general education and to better comprehend subjects that you may eventually teach); to enable you to put these historical perspectives and context to work in pedagogy; to sharpen your independence of thought; and to improve your writing skills.

 

Students will design and prepare Two 5E Lesson Plans (each having a minimum length of 1200 words). Detailed instructions will be distributed separately. You will select the subject of these lesson plans from a variety of options. Once graded, you will incorporate corrections into your lesson plan, to electronically post the revised product, which will improve your grade. There will be several quizzes and writing assignments. All students will take a Midterm Exam, designed to test the extent to which you have followed, engaged, and learned from the topics discussed in class and in the readings. Furthermore, you will have to do a Presentation of one of your lesson plans to a group of peers. (You will also write Comments on other presentations.) Finally, all students will have to take a Final Essay Exam (about 800 words) in the classroom during Finals Week.

 

NOTE: this course involves a weekly discussion session with the Teaching Assistant from the History Department. You are required to attend one such session per week, to carry out work for the course.

 

This is an upper-division history course. The assigned readings vary in length, and we encourage you to read thoughtfully rather than waste your time skimming and forgetting. Some of the readings will be from primary sources (such as writings by prominent scientists), other readings will be from secondary texts (such as by historians). You will also be required to do additional research and reading for the lesson plans; so keep this in mind when budgeting your time for this course. Classes will be conducted as a mixture of lecture and discussion. Accordingly, attendance and participation are important, as you can also see from the grading distributions below. Attendance will be taken daily, and will be used in evaluating your overall grade for class participation. You are welcome to speak up at any time.

 

Texts:

There is a required Course Packet, available for purchase only at Jenn’s Copies on 2518 Guadalupe at Dean Keaton. Also, additional readings are available online, on Blackboard.

 

Grading:

This course is listed as having a Substantial Writing Component; therefore, much of your final grade will be based on written expression. The grading breakdown is as follows:

Class participation 10% (for speaking; minus absences, see below)

Quizzes and Assignments    16%

First Lesson Plan    16%

Midterm Exam    16% (in class)

Second Lesson Plan 16%

Presentation    10%

Final Exam    16% (in a classroom, during Finals Week)

HIS 322M • History Of Modern Science

39785 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WAG 101
show description

This course explores a selection of topics and episodes in the history of science. The main time frame ranges from the early 1600s to 1945 (the end of World War II). The major scientific developments discussed will include the Copernican revolution, Newton’s contributions to physics and their influence, the origins and rise of Darwin’s theory of evolution, the Eugenics movement, the Scopes Monkey Trial, the origins of Einstein’s theories of relativity, and the early development of nuclear weapons.

Readings:

Hal Hellman, Great Feuds in Science, New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1998.

Alberto Martínez, Science Secrets, Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh University Press, 2011.

Jonathan Miller, Darwin for Beginners, New York: Pantheon Books, 1982.

Stephen J. Gould, Ever Since Darwin, New York: W.W. Norton, 1977/1992.

Grading:

Attendance   10%

Quizzes 15%

First Exam 20%

Second Exam 25%

Final Exam  30%

HIS 380K • Science And Conjectures

40180 • Spring 2014
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 2.124
show description

This reading seminar analyzes major topics in history of science. We will mostly analyze primary sources, including famous works that triggered conceptual revolutions and intense popular interest: works by Galileo, Darwin, Einstein, and others. We will discuss major controversies in the relations between sciences and Christian religions: transcripts of the Catholic Inquisition’s proceedings against Galileo (1633), and transcripts of the Dayton, Tennessee, trial against John Scopes for teaching evolution in public schools (1925). In physics, we will discuss Einstein’s relativity (1905 and 1916) and Heisenberg’s uncertainty (1927), especially in relation to the demise of positivism and the growth of relativism in the social sciences during the later 1900s. Also, we will discuss the development of scientific and pseudo-scientific theories of human races, including influential theories of polygenism, evolution, and eugenics. The course does not presuppose any specialized knowledge of the sciences in question. Nonetheless, we will clarify major scientific concepts and theories. The aim is to develop an accurate and sophisticated understanding of how major works in the sciences affected world-views at various times: how people used to “cut up” the world into particular entities, categories, or law-like relations, and how such world-views varied over time. We will analyze how scientists reached consensus, and how scientific standards changed over time. We will discuss various efforts to find criteria of demarcation between science, non-science, and pseudoscience. In particular, we will discuss Karl Popper’s work on this issue, and subsequent critiques.

In biology, we will analyze Darwin’s theory of evolution, especially as it appears in the first edition of his Origin of Species. We will elaborate this theme in readings and discussions about human evolution, theories of race, eugenics, studies of criminal behavior, and even a discussion of the growth of knowledge or the structure of scientific revolutions, in analogy to natural selection. In physics, we will discuss the rise of Einstein’s theories of relativity: how his original writings embodied departures from Newton’s paradigmatic style of physics, and how this departure affected physics and the sciences as a whole, including the social sciences. We will discuss how some German physicists rushed to abandon causality and determinism after WWI, and how this development related to social and intellectual currents that criticized rationalism.

Grades will be based on response essays (20%), class presentations (10%), historiographical essays (40%), and class participation (30%).

Partial list of Readings:

Maurice A. Finocchiaro, ed., The Galileo Affair: A Documentary History (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989).

Thomas Robert Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of Population (London: Johnson, 1798), or the edition of 1826 (read by Darwin).

Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species (1859).

Francis Galton, “Comparative Worth of Races,” in Hereditary Genius (London: Macmillan & Co., 1869), pp. 336-350; read also 351-353.

Charles Darwin, Descent of Man (1871), “On the Races of Man,” pp. 215-250; “Sexual Differences,” pp. 316-405Cesare Lombroso, Criminal Man (1st ed. 1876) translated and abridged by Gina Lombroso (New York: Putnam, 1911), selections from Chapters 1, 2, 3.

 Court transcripts:  Jeffrey P. Moran, The Scopes Trial (Bedford / St. Martin’s, 2002). “Bryan’s Last Speech,” 1925.

Albert Einstein, “On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies,” Annalen der Physik, Vol. 17 (1905).

Albert Einstein, Relativity: The Special and the General Theory (1917).

Peter Galison, “Einstein’s Clocks: The Place of Time,” Critical Inquiry, vol. 26  (2000), pp. 355–389.

Alberto A. Martínez, “Material History and Imaginary Clocks: Poincaré, Einstein, and Galison on Simultaneity.”Werner Heisenberg, Physics and Beyond: Encounters and Conversations (Harper & Row, 1971).

Paul Forman, “Weimar Culture, Causality, and Quantum Theory, 1918-1927: Adaptation by German Physicists and Mathematicians to a Hostile Intellectual Environment,” Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences, vol. 3 (1971), pp. 1-115.

Stanley Milgram, “Behavioral Study of Obedience,” Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, vol. 67, no. 4 (1963), pp. 371-378.

Craig Haney, Curtis Banks, and Philip Zimbardo, “Interpersonal Dynamics in a Simulated Prison,” International Journal of Criminology and Penology (1973), 69-97.

Richard J. Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Bell Curve (Free Press, 1994).

Karl Popper, “Science as Falsification,” excerpt from Conjectures and Refutations (1963).

HIS 329U • Perspectives On Science & Math

39725-39730 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAI 4.18
show description

This course explores a selection of topics and episodes in the history of science and mathematics. It has four interlocking goals: to provide an overview of the history of science and math (for general education and to better comprehend subjects that you may eventually teach); to enable you to put these historical perspectives and context to work in pedagogy; to sharpen your independence of thought; and to improve your writing skills.

 

Students will design and prepare Two 5E Lesson Plans (each having a minimum length of 1200 words). Detailed instructions will be distributed separately. You will select the subject of these lesson plans from a variety of options. Once graded, you will incorporate corrections into your lesson plan, to electronically post the revised product, which will improve your grade. There will be several quizzes and writing assignments. All students will take a Midterm Exam, designed to test the extent to which you have followed, engaged, and learned from the topics discussed in class and in the readings. Furthermore, you will have to do a Presentation of one of your lesson plans to a group of peers. (You will also write Comments on other presentations.) Finally, all students will have to take a Final Essay Exam (about 800 words) in the classroom during Finals Week.

 

NOTE: this course involves a weekly discussion session with the Teaching Assistant from the History Department. You are required to attend one such session per week, to carry out work for the course.

 

This is an upper-division history course. The assigned readings vary in length, and we encourage you to read thoughtfully rather than waste your time skimming and forgetting. Some of the readings will be from primary sources (such as writings by prominent scientists), other readings will be from secondary texts (such as by historians). You will also be required to do additional research and reading for the lesson plans; so keep this in mind when budgeting your time for this course. Classes will be conducted as a mixture of lecture and discussion. Accordingly, attendance and participation are important, as you can also see from the grading distributions below. Attendance will be taken daily, and will be used in evaluating your overall grade for class participation. You are welcome to speak up at any time.

 

Texts:

There is a required Course Packet, available for purchase only at Jenn’s Copies on 2518 Guadalupe at Dean Keaton. Also, additional readings are available online, on Blackboard.

 

Grading:

This course is listed as having a Substantial Writing Component; therefore, much of your final grade will be based on written expression. The grading breakdown is as follows:

Class participation 10% (for speaking; minus absences, see below)

Quizzes and Assignments    16%

First Lesson Plan    16%

Midterm Exam    16% (in class)

Second Lesson Plan 16%

Presentation    10%

Final Exam    16% (in a classroom, during Finals Week)

HIS 329U • Perspectives On Science & Math

39735-39740 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAI 4.18
show description

This course explores a selection of topics and episodes in the history of science and mathematics. It has four interlocking goals: to provide an overview of the history of science and math (for general education and to better comprehend subjects that you may eventually teach); to enable you to put these historical perspectives and context to work in pedagogy; to sharpen your independence of thought; and to improve your writing skills.

 

Students will design and prepare Two 5E Lesson Plans (each having a minimum length of 1200 words). Detailed instructions will be distributed separately. You will select the subject of these lesson plans from a variety of options. Once graded, you will incorporate corrections into your lesson plan, to electronically post the revised product, which will improve your grade. There will be several quizzes and writing assignments. All students will take a Midterm Exam, designed to test the extent to which you have followed, engaged, and learned from the topics discussed in class and in the readings. Furthermore, you will have to do a Presentation of one of your lesson plans to a group of peers. (You will also write Comments on other presentations.) Finally, all students will have to take a Final Essay Exam (about 800 words) in the classroom during Finals Week.

 

NOTE: this course involves a weekly discussion session with the Teaching Assistant from the History Department. You are required to attend one such session per week, to carry out work for the course.

 

This is an upper-division history course. The assigned readings vary in length, and we encourage you to read thoughtfully rather than waste your time skimming and forgetting. Some of the readings will be from primary sources (such as writings by prominent scientists), other readings will be from secondary texts (such as by historians). You will also be required to do additional research and reading for the lesson plans; so keep this in mind when budgeting your time for this course. Classes will be conducted as a mixture of lecture and discussion. Accordingly, attendance and participation are important, as you can also see from the grading distributions below. Attendance will be taken daily, and will be used in evaluating your overall grade for class participation. You are welcome to speak up at any time.

 

Texts:

There is a required Course Packet, available for purchase only at Jenn’s Copies on 2518 Guadalupe at Dean Keaton. Also, additional readings are available online, on Blackboard.

 

Grading:

This course is listed as having a Substantial Writing Component; therefore, much of your final grade will be based on written expression. The grading breakdown is as follows:

Class participation 10% (for speaking; minus absences, see below)

Quizzes and Assignments    16%

First Lesson Plan    16%

Midterm Exam    16% (in class)

Second Lesson Plan 16%

Presentation    10%

Final Exam    16% (in a classroom, during Finals Week)

 

HIS 350L • Einstein In Age Of Conflict

39550 • Spring 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 0.120
(also listed as CTI 371 )
show description

While age-old scientific concepts were being overturned by the rise of modern physics, Europe was torn apart by wars of unprecedented scale. This history course analyzes these developments, examining the rise of the theories of relativity and quantum mechanics against the stage of international political upheavals. Following the life of Albert Einstein, the course focuses on conceptual developments (from the 1880s through the 1940s) and intellectual conflicts. It also studies the lives of physicists such as Max Planck, Werner Heisenberg, and J. Robert Oppenheimer, in the context of changing cultural and political environments. We will read and discuss various kinds of materials: manuscripts, letters, accounts by historians, physicists, essays, and even secret transcripts of controversial conversations. The material will be understandable even to students with no significant background in physics. Among the topics involved are the following: How did relativity and the quantum clash with earlier conceptions of nature? Why did physics become so apparently difficult to understand? In Europe and America, how did scientists and politicians behave in times of international catastrophe? How were the academic and social orders affected by the development of nuclear weapons?

Grading

  • One reaction essay, of 600 words in length. 
  • One historical analysis paper, 1000 words. The topic of the historical analysis paper will be individually selected by each student from a few alternatives. 
  • Final Research Paper, of at least 2500 words. A draft of the introduction or outline of the Research Paper will be expected 3 weeks before the final due date; for critical feedback. The subject of the final Research Paper will be designed by each student under advisement with the Instructor. This will equal 75% of the grade for the course.

Texts (subject to change)

  • Jürgen Neffe, Einstein: A Biography, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.
  • John Heilbron, The Dilemmas of an Upright Man. Max Planck and the Fortunes of German Science. Harvard University Press, 2000.

HIS 366N • Biology, Behavior, & Injustice

39725 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 4.134
(also listed as CTI 370 )
show description

This course explores interesting episodes in the history of science, focusing on questions about what aspects of human behavior are essentially determined by biological factors rather than by experiences and society. Changing beliefs about what is natural have affected how some people are treated, so we will discuss the social consequences of such notions. The course will include the following topics: theories of race, Darwin’s works, evolution in schools and U.S. courts, American eugenics and Nazi science, differences between women and men, IQ testing, the controversy about DNA and Rosalind Franklin, studies of twins separated at birth, genetic engineering, ethical issues on cloning animals and humans, biotechnology, the immortal cells of Henrietta Lacks, designer babies, biology in forensic science. This is a lecture course, with participation encouraged.

This course fulfills a College of Liberal Arts Science Component: Alternative Science & Technology course.

Grading: First exam 20%, Midterm Exam 20%, Final Exam 30%, Quizzes 20%, Attendance 10%

Texts: Some readings are in the Course Packet, required, which will be available at Jenn’s Copy & Binding, 2518 Guadalupe St. There are no readings at the Libraries, on reserve, instead, all other readings will be available online through the UT Libraries website or on Blackboard: https://courses.utexas.edu/

Some of the readings: Francis Galton, "Comparative Worth of Races," in Hereditary Genius (1869). Charles Darwin, Descent of Man (1871), "On the Races of Man," and “Sexual Differences." Cesare Lombroso, Criminal Man (1st ed. 1876). Lombroso, The Female Offender (1895). Julien Offray de La Mettrie, Man a Machine (1748). Francis Galton, "Eugenics: Its Definition, Scope and Aims" (1904). Richard Dawkins, The Selfish Gene (1976).

 

HIS 366N • Biology, Behavior, & Injustice

39602 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GAR 0.102
(also listed as CTI 370 )
show description

This course explores interesting episodes in the history of science, focusing on questions about what aspects of human behavior are essentially determined by biological factors rather than by experiences and society. Changing beliefs about what is natural have affected how some people are treated, so we will discuss the social consequences of such notions. The course will include the following topics: theories of race, Darwin’s works, evolution in schools and U.S. courts, American eugenics and Nazi science, differences between women and men, IQ testing, the controversy about DNA and Rosalind Franklin, studies of twins separated at birth, genetic engineering, ethical issues on cloning animals and humans, biotechnology, the immortal cells of Henrietta Lacks, designer babies, biology in forensic science. This is a lecture course, with participation encouraged.

This course fulfills a College of Liberal Arts Science Component: Alternative Science & Technology course.

Grading: First exam 20%, Midterm Exam 20%, Final Exam 30%, Quizzes 20%, Attendance 10%

Texts: Some readings are in the Course Packet, required, which will be available at Jenn’s Copy & Binding, 2518 Guadalupe St. There are no readings at the Libraries, on reserve, instead, all other readings will be available online through the UT Libraries website or on Blackboard: https://courses.utexas.edu/

Some of the readings: Francis Galton, "Comparative Worth of Races," in Hereditary Genius (1869). Charles Darwin, Descent of Man (1871), "On the Races of Man," and “Sexual Differences." Cesare Lombroso, Criminal Man (1st ed. 1876). Lombroso, The Female Offender (1895). Julien Offray de La Mettrie, Man a Machine (1748). Francis Galton, "Eugenics: Its Definition, Scope and Aims" (1904). Richard Dawkins, The Selfish Gene (1976).

 

HIS 322M • History Of Modern Science

39260 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WEL 2.308
show description

This course analyzes major developments from the Scientific Revolution of the 1600s until the rise of Big Science in the 20th century. It begins with astronomy and the famous trial of Galileo by the Catholic Inquisition. It includes discussions of major historical events in relation to science, including the Great Plague of 1665, the Eugenics movement, and World War II. Scientific developments covered include Newton?s contributions to physics and their influence, alchemy, the origins and rise of Darwin's theory of evolution, the Scopes Monkey Trial, the origins of Einstein's theories of relativity, and sociobiology.


HIS 350L • Einstein In Age Of Conflicts

39335 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 2.112
(also listed as CTI 370 )
show description

Course Description:

While eccentric physicists overturned fundamental scientific concepts, Europe was torn apart by wars of

unprecedented scale. This history course analyzes these developments, examining the rise of the theories

of relativity and quantum mechanics in the stage of international political upheavals. Following the life

and work of Albert Einstein, the course focuses on conceptual developments and intellectual conflicts

(mainly from the 1880s through the 1940s). It also studies the lives of physicists such as Max Planck,

Werner Heisenberg, and J. Robert Oppenheimer, in the context of changing cultural and political

conflicts. The material will be understandable even to students with no significant background in physics.

Among the questions that we will cover are the following:

• How did relativity and the quantum clash with earlier conceptions of nature?

• Why did physics become so apparently difficult to understand?

• How did Planck navigate scientific success, duties, and tragedy as he rose in society?

• How did Einstein conceive of the special theory of relativity?

• Did Einstein’s wife secretly collaborate in his works?

• Did the intellectual climate of post-war Germany lead physicists to change ideas about nature?

• In Europe and America, how did scientists and politicians confront international catastrophe?

• Why did Einstein criticize quantum mechanics?

• How did religion relate to developments in physics?

• Did German physicists such as Heisenberg contribute to Nazi projects?

• How were the academic and social orders affected by the development of nuclear weapons?

 

From the assigned readings, each student will choose a day to present in class. Each presentation may last around 30 minutes, and will involve also our comments.

Required Readings: available at the UT Co-op:

• Ju ürgen Neffe, Einstein: A Biography, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.

• John Heilbron, The Dilemmas of an Upright Man. Max Planck and the Fortunes of German

Science. Harvard University Press, 2000.

• Additional reading materials will be distributed in class, plus, each student will research other

reading selections, especially primary sources.

The main required readings are Neffe’s biography of Einstein and Heilbron’s biography of Planck.

 

Attendance Policy: Attendance is required.

 

Course assignments

You’ll be required to complete several writing assignments. There will be Reaction Essays (500 words

each) in which you will critically respond to material covered in class. There will also be a Research

Paper (2500 words) where you will pursue a topic of your choice by finding and using appropriate

materials from the library, both primary and secondary sources. You will have opportunities to edit and

rewrite your work, and to read other students’ papers and give them peer review feedback.

Moreover, all students will be expected to take a Subject Comprehension Exam, designed to test the

extent to which you have followed, engaged, and learned from the topics discussed in class and in the

readings.

The class will be conducted as a discussion; attendance and participation are therefore essential.

This course carries a Writing Flag. 65% of the final grade will be based on written assignments.

 

COURSE GRADES will include plus and minus: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, etc. The grading breakdown is as follows:

Class participation 15%

Writing Assignments 30%

Subject Comprehension Exam 20%

Final Research Paper 35%

minus absences – 0.5 course points per unexcused absence.

HIS 322M • History Of Modern Science

39535 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WEL 2.308
show description

This course analyzes major developments from the Scientific Revolution of the 1600s until the rise of Big Science in the 20th century. It begins with astronomy and the famous trial of Galileo by the Catholic Inquisition. It includes discussions of major historical events in relation to science, including the Great Plague of 1665, the Eugenics movement, and World War II. Scientific developments covered include Newton?s contributions to physics and their influence, alchemy, the origins and rise of Darwin's theory of evolution, the Scopes Monkey Trial, the origins of Einstein's theories of relativity, and sociobiology.


HIS 350L • Einstein In Age Of Conflicts

39650 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CBA 4.348
show description

While age-old scientific concepts were being overturned by the rise of modern physics, Europe was torn apart by wars of unprecedented scale. This history course analyzes these developments, examining the rise of the theories of relativity and quantum mechanics against the stage of international political upheavals. Following the life of Albert Einstein, the course focuses on conceptual developments (from the 1880s through the 1940s) and intellectual conflicts. It also studies the lives of physicists such as Max Planck, Werner Heisenberg, and J. Robert Oppenheimer, in the context of changing cultural and political environments. We will read and discuss various kinds of materials: manuscripts, letters, accounts by historians, physicists, essays, and even secret transcripts of controversial conversations. The material will be understandable even to students with no significant background in physics. Among the topics involved are the following: How did relativity and the quantum clash with earlier conceptions of nature? Why did physics become so apparently difficult to understand? In Europe and America, how did scientists and politicians behave in times of international catastrophe? How were the academic and social orders affected by the development of nuclear weapons?

Grading

 

  • One reaction essay, of 600 words in length. 
  • One historical analysis paper, 1000 words. The topic of the historical analysis paper will be individually selected by each student from a few alternatives. 
  • Final Research Paper, of at least 2500 words. A draft of the introduction or outline of the Research Paper will be expected 3 weeks before the final due date; for critical feedback. The subject of the final Research Paper will be designed by each student under advisement with the Instructor. This will equal 75% of the grade for the course.

 

 

HIS 329U • Persp On Science & Math-Uteach

39160-39165 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAI 4.18
show description

History 329U: Perspectives on Science and Math
11-11:50 AM, and 2:00-2:50 PM, in Classroom 4.18 PAI

Professor Alberto Martínez, Ph.D. D
epartment of History Office: Garrison Hall, GAR 0.138
Office hours: MW 1:00-1:50, and by appointment
almartinez@mail.utexas.edu

Ben Breen, Teaching Assistant
Office hours: Fridays 1:00-3:00
At: Café Medici 22nd St & Guadalupe
breen85@gmail.com Office: BUR 4.12 by appointment

Discussions in PAI 4.18: M 12:00-12:50, M 3:00-3:50, W 12:00-12:50, W 3:00-3:50

** * * * * * * * * * *

This course explores a selection of topics and episodes in the history of science and mathematics. It has four interlocking goals: to provide an overview of the history of science and math (for general education and to better comprehend subjects that you may eventually teach); to enable you to put these historical perspectives and context to work in pedagogy; to sharpen your independence of thought; and to improve your writing skills.

Students will design and prepare Two 5E Lesson Plans (each having a minimum length of 1200 words). Detailed instructions will be distributed separately. You will select the subject of these lesson plans from a variety of options. Once graded, you will incorporate corrections into your lesson plan, to electronically post the revised product, which will improve your grade. There will be several quizzes and writing assignments. All students will take a Midterm Exam, designed to test the extent to which you have followed, engaged, and learned from the topics discussed in class and in the readings. Furthermore, you will have to do a Presentation of one of your lesson plans to a group of peers. (You will also write Comments on other presentations.) Finally, all students will have to take a Final Essay Exam (about 800 words) in the classroom during Finals Week.

NOTE: this course involves a weekly discussion session with the Teaching Assistant from the History Department. You are required to attend one such session per week, to carry out work for the course.

This is an upper-division history course. The assigned readings vary in length, and we encourage you to read thoughtfully rather than waste your time skimming and forgetting. Some of the readings will be from primary sources (such as writings by prominent scientists), other readings will be from secondary texts (such as by historians). You will also be required to do additional research and reading for the lesson plans; so keep this in mind when budgeting your time for this course. Classes will be conducted as a mixture of lecture and discussion. Accordingly, attendance and participation are important, as you can also see from the grading distributions below. Attendance will be taken daily, and will be used in evaluating your overall grade for class participation. You are welcome to speak up at any time.

READINGS: There is a required Course Packet, available for purchase only at Jenn’s Copies on 2518 Guadalupe at Dean Keaton. Also, additional readings are available online, on Blackboard. You are responsible for obtaining each reading assignment on time. Almost every day when there is an assigned reading, there will be a Reading Confirmation Quiz. The Class Calendar, below, lists the exact day when each reading will be tested.

The Class Calendar includes also a reliable schedule of when specific subjects will be covered in class. It also includes Project due dates, and the Exam dates. The date for the final exam, during finals week, is chosen by the UT Registrar, so it will be announced when posted.

GRADING:    This course is listed as having a Substantial Writing Component; therefore, much of your final grade will be based on written expression. The grading breakdown is as follows:
Class participation 10% (for speaking; minus absences, see below)
Quizzes and Assignments    16%
First Lesson Plan    16%
Midterm Exam    16% (in class)
Second Lesson Plan 16%
Presentation    10%
Final Exam    16% (in a classroom, during Finals Week)

ATTENDANCE:
Everyone is expected to attend classes. There will be a sign-in sheet every day. As a courtesy, you have one free absence-without-consequences. But after that you must provide written medical proof of illness, or another acceptable exemption, otherwise, you will lose .5 percentage points for each absence.

Work turned in late without an extension negotiated at least a week in advance will be penalized by one full letter grade.

Alongside the present syllabus, you should soon have a handout titled “Avoiding Plagiarism in History Courses,” which has been prepared by the History Department to help prevent this problem. Accordingly, University policies on plagiarism and academic dishonesty will be enforced in this class.

History 329U: Perspectives on Science and Math
Class Calendar, Fall 2010 Birdseye View of Mathematics, and What is a Science anyway?
READINGS

Aug.25 Wed. Birdseye View of Mathematics, and What is a Science anymay?

Aug.27 Fri. Pythagorean Mysticism
Quiz: “Triangle sacrifice to the gods” pp.1-15

Aug.30 Mon. Murder for Irrational numbers Plato’s Philosophy of Math
Quiz: “An irrational murder at sea” pp.16-29

Sept.1 Wed. Plato's Philosophy of Math
Quiz: Plato’s dialogue, Meno, on Blackboard

Sept.3 Fri. The man with the golden nose
Quiz: “Galileo’s Pythagorean heresy” pp.30-45

Sept.6 Mon. Labor Day

Sept.8 Wed. The crime of Galileo
Quiz: “Galileo’s Pythagorean heresy” pp.45-62

Sept.10 Fri. Paradoxes of division

Sept.13 Mon. Less than nothing, squared
Quiz: “Much ado about less than nothing” pp.18-42

Sept.15 Wed.  Imaginary Numbers: radical puzzles
Quiz: “Meaningless expressions” pp.43-79

Sept.17 Fri. 5-E lesson: Species and Monsters

Sept.20 Mon. Darwin at the Galápagos
Quiz: “What is a Species?” on Blackboard

Sept.22 Wed. Controversies over Evolution
Quiz: “Darwin’s missing frogs” pp.86-107

Sept.24 Fri. Alchemy and the Philosopher’s Stone
Quiz: “Impossible alchemy” pp.63-74

Sept.27 Mon. Impossible Chemistry: Marie Curie
Quiz: “Impossible alchemy” pp.75-85

Sept.29 Wed. Mendel, the misinterpreted Priest
Quiz: Mendel, on Blackboard

Oct. 1 Fri. Electric experiments
Quiz: “Seemingly impossible experiments” pp. 108-131

Oct. 4 MON. What is Discovery anyhow? __FIRST LESSON PLAN DUE in class_ ___

Oct. 6 Wed. Mysterious Rays   
Quiz: “Who discovered the invisibly small?” pp.132-148

Oct. 8 Fri. Pascal’ s triangle

Oct. 11 Mon. Geologists and Biologists versus Physicists   
Quiz: “Age of the Earth,” 105-120 Class Presentation

Oct. 13 Wed. Class Presentation

Oct. 15 Fri. Class Presentation
 
Oct.18 Mon.  *MID-TERM EXAM in class* _______________________    ______

Oct. 20 Wed. Paradoxes in the Calculus   
Quiz: “The war over the infinitely small” pp.149-177

Oct. 22 Fri. Mathematical Psychology of Prisoners’ Dilemmas

Oct. 25 Mon. Class Presentation

Oct. 27 Wed. Class Presentation

Oct. 29 Fri. Revolution: Continental Drift
Quiz: “Wegener versus everyone” on Blackboard
 
Nov. 1 Mon. Class Presentation

Nov. 3 Wed. Class Presentation

Nov. 5 Fri. The Improbable Statistics of TV game shows

Nov. 8 Mon. Class Presentation

Nov.10 Wed.  Einstein and the Relativity of Time
Quiz: “Relativity” pp. 178-198

Nov.12 Fri. Class Presentation
Quiz: “The Cult of the Quiet Wife” 199-211
 
Nov.15 Mon.    Class Presentation    2ND LESSON PLAN DUE_______________

Nov.17 Wed. Class Presentation
Quiz: “The Secret of Einstein’s Creativity” pp.212-228

Nov.19 Fri. Impossible geometry?
Quiz: “Revelations against Euclid’s Faith” pp.229-242

Nov.22 Mon. Philosophies of Mathematics
Quiz: “Revelations against Euclid’s Faith” pp.243-255

Nov.24 Wed. Class Presentation

Nov.26 Fri. THANKSGIVING
 
Nov.29 Mon. Biology and Ideology
Quiz: “Eugenics against inferior blood” pp.256-271

Dec. 1. Wed. Class Presentation

Dec. 3 Fri. The Big Picture: History in Schools
Quiz “The cult of Pythagoras” pp.272-294

Dec. * FINAL EXAM * during Finals Week, in the classroom; date and time to be announced___

This course contains a Writing flag.

HIS 329U • Persp On Science & Math-Uteach

39170-39175 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAI 4.18
show description

History 329U: Perspectives on Science and Math
11-11:50 AM, and 2:00-2:50 PM, in Classroom 4.18 PAI

Professor Alberto Martínez, Ph.D. D
epartment of History Office: Garrison Hall, GAR 0.138
Office hours: MW 1:00-1:50, and by appointment
almartinez@mail.utexas.edu

Ben Breen, Teaching Assistant
Office hours: Fridays 1:00-3:00
At: Café Medici 22nd St & Guadalupe
breen85@gmail.com Office: BUR 4.12 by appointment

Discussions in PAI 4.18: M 12:00-12:50, M 3:00-3:50, W 12:00-12:50, W 3:00-3:50

** * * * * * * * * * *

This course explores a selection of topics and episodes in the history of science and mathematics. It has four interlocking goals: to provide an overview of the history of science and math (for general education and to better comprehend subjects that you may eventually teach); to enable you to put these historical perspectives and context to work in pedagogy; to sharpen your independence of thought; and to improve your writing skills.

Students will design and prepare Two 5E Lesson Plans (each having a minimum length of 1200 words). Detailed instructions will be distributed separately. You will select the subject of these lesson plans from a variety of options. Once graded, you will incorporate corrections into your lesson plan, to electronically post the revised product, which will improve your grade. There will be several quizzes and writing assignments. All students will take a Midterm Exam, designed to test the extent to which you have followed, engaged, and learned from the topics discussed in class and in the readings. Furthermore, you will have to do a Presentation of one of your lesson plans to a group of peers. (You will also write Comments on other presentations.) Finally, all students will have to take a Final Essay Exam (about 800 words) in the classroom during Finals Week.

NOTE: this course involves a weekly discussion session with the Teaching Assistant from the History Department. You are required to attend one such session per week, to carry out work for the course.

This is an upper-division history course. The assigned readings vary in length, and we encourage you to read thoughtfully rather than waste your time skimming and forgetting. Some of the readings will be from primary sources (such as writings by prominent scientists), other readings will be from secondary texts (such as by historians). You will also be required to do additional research and reading for the lesson plans; so keep this in mind when budgeting your time for this course. Classes will be conducted as a mixture of lecture and discussion. Accordingly, attendance and participation are important, as you can also see from the grading distributions below. Attendance will be taken daily, and will be used in evaluating your overall grade for class participation. You are welcome to speak up at any time.

READINGS: There is a required Course Packet, available for purchase only at Jenn’s Copies on 2518 Guadalupe at Dean Keaton. Also, additional readings are available online, on Blackboard. You are responsible for obtaining each reading assignment on time. Almost every day when there is an assigned reading, there will be a Reading Confirmation Quiz. The Class Calendar, below, lists the exact day when each reading will be tested.

The Class Calendar includes also a reliable schedule of when specific subjects will be covered in class. It also includes Project due dates, and the Exam dates. The date for the final exam, during finals week, is chosen by the UT Registrar, so it will be announced when posted.

GRADING:    This course is listed as having a Substantial Writing Component; therefore, much of your final grade will be based on written expression. The grading breakdown is as follows:
Class participation 10% (for speaking; minus absences, see below)
Quizzes and Assignments    16%
First Lesson Plan    16%
Midterm Exam    16% (in class)
Second Lesson Plan 16%
Presentation    10%
Final Exam    16% (in a classroom, during Finals Week)

ATTENDANCE:
Everyone is expected to attend classes. There will be a sign-in sheet every day. As a courtesy, you have one free absence-without-consequences. But after that you must provide written medical proof of illness, or another acceptable exemption, otherwise, you will lose .5 percentage points for each absence.

Work turned in late without an extension negotiated at least a week in advance will be penalized by one full letter grade.

Alongside the present syllabus, you should soon have a handout titled “Avoiding Plagiarism in History Courses,” which has been prepared by the History Department to help prevent this problem. Accordingly, University policies on plagiarism and academic dishonesty will be enforced in this class.

History 329U: Perspectives on Science and Math
Class Calendar, Fall 2010 Birdseye View of Mathematics, and What is a Science anyway?
READINGS

Aug.25 Wed. Birdseye View of Mathematics, and What is a Science anymay?

Aug.27 Fri. Pythagorean Mysticism
Quiz: “Triangle sacrifice to the gods” pp.1-15

Aug.30 Mon. Murder for Irrational numbers Plato’s Philosophy of Math
Quiz: “An irrational murder at sea” pp.16-29

Sept.1 Wed. Plato's Philosophy of Math
Quiz: Plato’s dialogue, Meno, on Blackboard

Sept.3 Fri. The man with the golden nose
Quiz: “Galileo’s Pythagorean heresy” pp.30-45

Sept.6 Mon. Labor Day

Sept.8 Wed. The crime of Galileo
Quiz: “Galileo’s Pythagorean heresy” pp.45-62

Sept.10 Fri. Paradoxes of division

Sept.13 Mon. Less than nothing, squared
Quiz: “Much ado about less than nothing” pp.18-42

Sept.15 Wed.  Imaginary Numbers: radical puzzles
Quiz: “Meaningless expressions” pp.43-79

Sept.17 Fri. 5-E lesson: Species and Monsters

Sept.20 Mon. Darwin at the Galápagos
Quiz: “What is a Species?” on Blackboard

Sept.22 Wed. Controversies over Evolution
Quiz: “Darwin’s missing frogs” pp.86-107

Sept.24 Fri. Alchemy and the Philosopher’s Stone
Quiz: “Impossible alchemy” pp.63-74

Sept.27 Mon. Impossible Chemistry: Marie Curie
Quiz: “Impossible alchemy” pp.75-85

Sept.29 Wed. Mendel, the misinterpreted Priest
Quiz: Mendel, on Blackboard

Oct. 1 Fri. Electric experiments
Quiz: “Seemingly impossible experiments” pp. 108-131

Oct. 4 MON. What is Discovery anyhow? __FIRST LESSON PLAN DUE in class_ ___

Oct. 6 Wed. Mysterious Rays   
Quiz: “Who discovered the invisibly small?” pp.132-148

Oct. 8 Fri. Pascal’ s triangle

Oct. 11 Mon. Geologists and Biologists versus Physicists   
Quiz: “Age of the Earth,” 105-120 Class Presentation

Oct. 13 Wed. Class Presentation

Oct. 15 Fri. Class Presentation
 
Oct.18 Mon.  *MID-TERM EXAM in class* _______________________    ______

Oct. 20 Wed. Paradoxes in the Calculus   
Quiz: “The war over the infinitely small” pp.149-177

Oct. 22 Fri. Mathematical Psychology of Prisoners’ Dilemmas

Oct. 25 Mon. Class Presentation

Oct. 27 Wed. Class Presentation

Oct. 29 Fri. Revolution: Continental Drift
Quiz: “Wegener versus everyone” on Blackboard
 
Nov. 1 Mon. Class Presentation

Nov. 3 Wed. Class Presentation

Nov. 5 Fri. The Improbable Statistics of TV game shows

Nov. 8 Mon. Class Presentation

Nov.10 Wed.  Einstein and the Relativity of Time
Quiz: “Relativity” pp. 178-198

Nov.12 Fri. Class Presentation
Quiz: “The Cult of the Quiet Wife” 199-211
 
Nov.15 Mon.    Class Presentation    2ND LESSON PLAN DUE_______________

Nov.17 Wed. Class Presentation
Quiz: “The Secret of Einstein’s Creativity” pp.212-228

Nov.19 Fri. Impossible geometry?
Quiz: “Revelations against Euclid’s Faith” pp.229-242

Nov.22 Mon. Philosophies of Mathematics
Quiz: “Revelations against Euclid’s Faith” pp.243-255

Nov.24 Wed. Class Presentation

Nov.26 Fri. THANKSGIVING
 
Nov.29 Mon. Biology and Ideology
Quiz: “Eugenics against inferior blood” pp.256-271

Dec. 1. Wed. Class Presentation

Dec. 3 Fri. The Big Picture: History in Schools
Quiz “The cult of Pythagoras” pp.272-294

Dec. * FINAL EXAM * during Finals Week, in the classroom; date and time to be announced___

This course contains a Writing flag.

This course contains a Writing flag.

HIS 329U • Persp On Sci And Math-Uteach-W

39515-39520 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 PAI 4.18
show description

History 329U: Perspectives on Science and Math
11-11:50 AM, and 2:00-2:50 PM, in Classroom 4.18 PAI

Professor Alberto Martínez, Ph.D.
Department of History
Office: Garrison Hall, GAR 0.138
Office hours: MW 1:00-1:50, and by appointment
almartinez@mail.utexas.edu

D.B. Briscoe, Teaching Assistant, dbriscoe@mail.utexas.edu

* * * * * * * * * * * *
This course explores a selection of topics and episodes in the history of science and mathematics. It
has four interlocking goals: to provide an overview of the history of science and math (for general
education and to better comprehend subjects that you may eventually teach); to enable you to put
these historical perspectives and context to work in pedagogy; to sharpen your independence of
thought; and to improve your writing skills.

Students will design and prepare Two 5E Lesson Plans (each having a minimum length of
1200 words). Detailed instructions will be distributed separately. You will select the subject of
these lesson plans from a variety of options. Once graded, you will incorporate corrections
into your lesson plan, to electronically post the revised product, which will improve your
grade. There will be several quizzes and writing assignments. All students will take a Midterm
Exam
, designed to test the extent to which you have followed, engaged, and learned from the
topics discussed in class and in the readings. Furthermore, you will have to do a Presentation
of one of your lesson plans to a group of peers. (You will also write Comments on other
presentations.) Finally, all students will have to take a Final Essay Exam (about 800 words)
in the classroom during Finals Week.

NOTE: this course involves a weekly recitation session with the Teaching Assistant from the History
Department. You are required to attend one such session per week, to carry out work for the course.

This is an upper-division history course. The assigned readings vary in length, and we encourage you
to read thoughtfully rather than waste your time skimming and forgetting. Some of the readings will
be from primary sources (such as writings by prominent scientists), other readings will be from
secondary texts (such as by historians). You will also be required to do additional research and reading
for the lesson plans; so keep this in mind when budgeting your time for this course. Classes will be
conducted as a mixture of lecture and discussion. Accordingly, attendance and participation are
important, as you can also see from the grading distributions below. Attendance will be taken daily,
and will be used in evaluating your overall grade for class participation. You are welcome to speak up
at any time.

READINGS: There is a required Course Packet, available for purchase only at Jenn’s Copies on
Guadalupe at Dean Keaton. Also, additional readings are available online, on Blackboard. You are
responsible for obtaining each reading assignment on time. Every day when there is an assigned
reading, there will be a Reading Confirmation Quiz. The Class Calendar, below, lists the exact
day when each reading will be tested.

The Class Calendar includes also a reliable schedule of when specific subjects will be covered in class.
It also includes Project due dates, and the Exam dates. The date for the final exam, during finals
week, is chosen by the registrar, so it will be announced when posted.

GRADING:
This course is listed as having a Substantial Writing Component; therefore, much of
your final grade will be based on written expression. The grading breakdown is as follows:
Class participation 10% (for speaking; minus absences, see below)
Quizzes and Assignments 16%
First Lesson Plan 16%
Midterm Exam 16% (in class)
Second Lesson Plan 16%
Presentation 10%
Final Exam 16% (in a classroom, during Finals Week)

ATTENDANCE:
Everyone is expected to attend classes. There will be a sign-in sheet every day. As a
courtesy, you have one free absence-without-consequences. But after that you must provide written
medical proof of illness, or another acceptable exemption, otherwise, you will lose .5 percentage
points for each absence.


Work turned in late without an extension negotiated at least a week in advance will be penalized by
one full letter grade.

Alongside the present syllabus, you should soon have a handout titled “Avoiding Plagiarism in
History Courses,” which has been prepared by the History Department to help prevent this problem.
Accordingly, University policies on plagiarism and academic dishonesty will be enforced in this class.

History 329U: Perspectives on Science and Math

Class Calendar, Spring 2010

Jan.20 Wed. Birdseye View of Mathematics, and What is a Science anyway?
Jan.22 Fri. Pythagorean Mysticism
Jan.25 Mon. Murder for Irrational numbers
Jan.27. Wed. Plato’s Philosophy of Math
Jan.29 Fri. Copernicus and the man with the golden nose
Feb. 1 Mon. The crime of Galileo
Feb. 3 Wed. Paradoxes of division
Feb. 5 Fri. Less than nothing, squared
Feb. 8 Mon. Imaginary Numbers: radical puzzles
Sept.10 Wed. 5-E lesson: Species, Hybrids, and Monsters
Feb.12 Fri. Darwin at the Galápagos
Feb.15 Mon. Controversies over Evolution
Feb.17 Wed. Alchemy and the Philosopher’s Stone
Feb.19 Fri. Impossible Chemistry: Marie Curie
Feb.22 Mon. Mendel, the misinterpreted Priest
Feb.24 Wed. Electrical experiments
Feb.26 Fri. J.J. Thomson and Cathode Rays
Mar.1 MON. What is Discovery anyhow? __FIRST LESSON PLAN DUE in class_ ___
Mar. 3 Wed. Pascal’s triangle
Mar. 5 Fri. Geologists and Biologists versus Physicists
Mar. 8 Mon. Class Presentation
Mar.10 Wed. Class Presentation

Mar.12 Fri. *MID-TERM EXAM in class*


March 15 to March 20 -- Spring Break

Mar. 22 Mon. Paradoxes in the Calculus
Mar.24 Wed. Prisoners’ dilemma
Mar.26 Fri. Class Presentation
Mar.29 Mon. Class Presentation
Mar.31 Wed. Revolution: Continental Drift
Apr. 2 Fri. Class Presentation
Apr.5 Mon Class Presentation
Apr.7 Wed. Improbable statistics
Apr.9 Fri. Class Presentation
Apr.12 Mon. Einstein and the Relativity of Time 2ND LESSON PLAN DUE_____
Apr.14 Wed. Relativity: Historical Perspectives
Apr.16 Fri. Class Presentation
Apr.19 Mon. Seemingly impossible geometry
Apr.21 Wed. Philosophies of Mathematics, Choose or continue to Sleepwalk
Apr.23 Fri. Class Presentation
Apr.26 Mon. Eugenics in America, and in World War II
Apr.28 Wed. Class Presentation
Apr.30 Fri. Biology and Ideology
May 3 Mon. Class Presentation
May 5 Wed. Class Presentation
May 7 Fri. Big Picture: History in Science and Math classes

Dec. * FINAL EXAM * during Finals Week, in the classroom; date and time to be announced

HIS 329U • Persp On Sci And Math-Uteach-W

39525-39530 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAI 4.18
show description

Course Description

Perspectives on Science and Math explores the intellectual, social, and cultural history of science and math from the Renaissance to the present. It is designed for students in UTeach Natural Sciences. The course has four interlocking goals: to give you an overview of the history of science and mathematics, for your general education and to help you reflect on your own reasons and goals for teaching science or math; to enable you to put this broader history and context to work in science and mathematics pedagogy; to improve your writing skills to competence or mastery; and likewise to improve you research and information analysis skills to competence of mastery. This is a writing flag class

 

The readings and lessons explore the why, how, and what of the history of science and math. We will attempt to identify and analyze the goals of natural philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians—why did they think the knowledge they made was important? We will investigate the practices by which people have established thecredibility or authority of knowledge—how did people agree on what was true? And we will study the content of theories—what did people know? While exploring these historical questions, we will pay especially close attention to the changing roles of science and math education. “We” is not a figure of speech here. This is a team taught class, and you are on the team. Nearly a third of the lessons will be developed and led by students. These lessons will focus especially on answering the last question; that is, what did people know?

 

There is a weekly discussion section connected to this course which students are required to attend.

 

Readings are posted on the course’s blackboard site. 

 

Grading Policies

 

Unless an extension is granted well in advance, the grade will drop a full letter for each day an assignment is late. “Sundry assignments” will not be accepted late. Plus/minus grades will be assigned. 

 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from Services for Students with Disabilities: 471-6259.

 

University policies on plagiarism and academic dishonesty will be enforced. 

 

 

 

Assignments

 

Participation: 15%

Attendance will be taken and factored into your grade. One unexcused absence is allowed. In addition, active and insightful engagement in the lessons will be rewarded—everyone is expected to participate in discussions. Attendance and participation in sections are included here.

 

Sundry Assignments: 10%

These are ungraded or plus-check-minus assignments completed in class or at home. Most are connected to a reading and are designed to improve comprehension and assure that students have completed the reading. They may include unannounced quizzes. 

 

Short Research Paper: 10%

This paper is closely linked to the 5E Lesson Plan (see below). Before preparing the 5E Lesson Plan with a partner, each student will research and write a three to four page essay exploring the subject of his/her lesson. 

 

5E Lesson Plan: 25%

Working in pairs, students will prepare, present, and revise one 5E Lesson Plan integrating a historical topic into a science or math lesson. These lessons are considered part of the class, and should focus on an interesting or important historical idea or method. The 5E Lesson Plans will be critical for providing the intellectual (as opposed to the social and cultural) history component of the course. Handouts, examples, rubrics, etc. will explain the assignment and establish clear expectations. 

 

Peer Review: 5%

Students will provide feedback to peers on 5E Lesson Plans and selected writing assignments.

 

Unit Reflections: 15% (5% each)

Two to four page written reflections on the readings, lectures, and discussions for each of the first three units. Due the Monday after the end of the unit.

 

Midterm Exam: 10%

The midterm will consist of identifications and short answer questions

 

Final Exam: 10%

The final exam will consist of identifications and short answer questions.

 

HIS 350L • Einstein In Age Of Conflicts

39990 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 400pm-530pm PAR 308
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 322M • History Of Modern Science

38975 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm BUR 108
show description

This course analyzes major developments from the Scientific Revolution of the 1600s until the rise of Big Science in the 20th century. It begins with astronomy and the famous trial of Galileo by the Catholic Inquisition. It includes discussions of major historical events in relation to science, including the Great Plague of 1665, the Eugenics movement, and World War II. Scientific developments covered include Newton?s contributions to physics and their influence, alchemy, the origins and rise of Darwin's theory of evolution, the Scopes Monkey Trial, the origins of Einstein's theories of relativity, and sociobiology.


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