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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Andrew Villalon

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., 1984, Yale University

Andrew Villalon

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-8004
  • Office: GAR 4.120
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: MW 3-5 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

Professor Villalon has specific interests in Late Medieval and Early Modern European history.

Courses taught

Villalon has taught courses such as Western Civilization, Medieval and Renaissance, Modern Revolutions, World War I, The Age of Reformation and Religious War along with various others.

Awards/Honors

Dillwyn F. Ratcliff Award for Distinguished Service in the Cause of Academic Freedom conferred by the University of Cincinnati Chapter of the American Association of University Professors (April, 1998). Professional-Scholarly Activity Award, University College, University of Cincinnati (2001).

HIS 362G • Early Western Colonialism

40040 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

This course (meeting three times a week) will examine the phenomenon of colonialism, in particular, its most prominent example:  the European Expansion across the globe that began at the end of the western Middle Ages and continued throughout the early modern period.  After looking at earlier colonizing efforts by western peoples, the course will concentrate on the first wave of European colonization (and decolonization) that began with the Portuguese attack on Ceuta in 1415 and ended with the revolutions of Nordfth and South America that encompassed the period from 1775 to the 1820s.  

Course Topics:

Earlier colonizing efforts undertaken by western peoples (Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Vikings, Crusaders)

Means and motives for European expansion:  Why Europe and not another region?

The technology behind expansion

The clash of civilizations

Colonial empires established by the “big five” European colonizers—Portugal, Spain, England, France, and Holland:  similarities and differences

Trading Empires vrs. Settlement Empires

Influences on the mother countries

“The Columbian Exchange”

The critical role of disease in European successes and failures

Why decolonization?

Course Readings:

Jared M. Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel, The Fate of Human Societies

Alfred W. Crosby, The Columbian Exchange (Any edition)

Several readings posted on the web

Grading

Two in-class exams, 25% each

Final exam during final exam period, 25%

10 page research paper, 25%

HIS 362K • Medieval Warfare

40065 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 2.312
show description

This one semester course will examine the development of warfare between the last Roman Empire and the early modern world (c. 400-1500). It will concentrate on the lands around the Mediterranean including northern and eastern Europe. Students will become acquainted with developments in warfare over the course of more than a millenium through the use of lectures and discussions, readings, photographs, and video. Among other things this course will examine the following topics: the collapse of the Roman military the advent of feudalism the rise of cavalry and its disputed connection to feudalism infantry in medieval warfare the birth of knighthood and chivalry evolving Christian and Muslim views of Just War the Crusades and Crusading orders (such as Knights Templar) the medieval castle and the race between fortifiers and attackers medieval arms and armor the influence of improved missile weapons on medieval warfare the gunpowder revolution of the later Middle Ages.

 

Required Reading/Viewing:

Books:

Charles W. C. Oman, The Art of War in the Middle Ages

Edward M. Peters, The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other

Source Materials

 

In addition to the two books assigned in this course, a number of articles will be posted on the

website.

 

Visual Materials (most or all of the following will be shown in class):

The Roman Legion (DVD)

The Barbarians/Visigoths (DVD)

The Barbarians/Huns (DVD)

The Barbarians/Vikings (DVD)

Modern Marvels: Castle and Dungeons (DVD)

NOVA/Ancient Empires: The Trebuchet (DVD)

The Bayeux Tapestry (CD)

The Crusades (as seen by Terry Jones) (3 of the 4 DVDs in the series)

Knights Templar (DVD)

The Barbarians/Mongols (DVD)

 

Grading

A course paper on some aspect of medieval war ( approximately 10 pages). Along with the paper, each student should submit photocopied source materials used in preparation of his/her paper. 33.3% of final grade

An in-class examination during a regular class period based on the lectures and readings, 33.3% of final grade

A final examination during the regularly scheduled final exam period. 33.3% of final grade

HIS 306N • Intro To Hist And Cul Of Spain

39565 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as AHC 310, EUS 306 )
show description

This one-semester course will explore the long history of  Spain from its beginnings in the stone age through the great social and economic upheavals of the twentieth century.  Beginning with an introduction to its geography and language, we shall touch on such topics as paleolithic settlement and art, the arrival of new groups (Celts, Greeks, Phoenicians), the Roman imperium, the Visigothic domination, the Islamic conquest and Christian reconquest (Reconquista), medieval kingdoms and their unification, the separate way of Portugal, the birth and death of  religious toleration, the rise and fall of Spain in the European state system, Hapsburg and Bourbon kings, the troubled nineteenth century and even more troubled twentieth, and finally, the emergence of one of Europe’s most democratic societies.   Wherever possible, the course will attempt to place Spain into the larger context of European and Mediterranean society.  Basic information will be conferred primarily through lectures by the professor.

Texts:

Simon Barton, A History of Spain (Palgrave MacMillan, 2004).

Olivia Remie Constable, Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997).

John Elliott, Imperial Spain 1469-1715.

Richard Herr, An Historical Essay on Modern Spain.

Grading:

A course paper on some aspect of the history and culture of Spain (8-10 pages).  25%

A portfolio on the history and culture of Spain which should contain text and/or visuals that you find about  fighting in the Middle Ages.  25%

Two tests, 25% each

HIS 362G • First World War

39955 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 2.304
show description

This course will examine the traumatic conflagration of 1914-18 that set the stage for the violent twentieth century. Once called "The Great War" by the generation that fought it, it was optimistically dubbed by some "the War to End All Wars." When it failed to achieve this noble goal and military conflict again rocked the world during the 1940s, the earlier struggle was rechristened World War I or the First World War, names by which it has been known ever since. This one-semester course will utilize lectures, readings, poetry, photographs, and film to *trace back into the 19th century the social,diplomatic, and military threads that ultimately combined to produce the First World War *explore the successive crises of the early 20th century leading up to the decisive events of 1914 that set the conflict in motion *examine in depth the course of the war, its effect upon the various participants, the evolution of military technology which it inspired, the profound social and economic changes which it wrought, and the life of the millions who were involved either on the battlefield or on the homefront *consider the outcome of the war and its many repercussions for the history of the twentieth century.

Texts:

E. M. Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front (the classic World War I novel)

Robert Graves, Goodbye to All That (the most famous WW1 memoir) (extensive selections)

Short selections, including documents and poetry. Required Films: Paths of Glory and Gallipoli

Grading:

Grades will be based primarily on two examinations during the term, a non-cumulative final examination, and a short paper (8-10 pages) on a subject of the student's choosing. (Discussion and class contributions will also be taken into consideration.)

HIS 362G • Early Western Colonialism

39635 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

This course (meeting three times a week) will examine the phenomenon of colonialism, in particular, its most prominent example:  the European Expansion across the globe that began at the end of the western Middle Ages and continued throughout the early modern period.  After looking at earlier colonizing efforts by western peoples, the course will concentrate on the first wave of European colonization (and decolonization) that began with the Portuguese attack on Ceuta in 1415 and ended with the revolutions of Nordfth and South America that encompassed the period from 1775 to the 1820s. 

 

Course Topics:

Earlier colonizing efforts undertaken by western peoples (Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Vikings, Crusaders)

Means and motives for European expansion:  Why Europe and not another region?

The technology behind expansion 

The clash of civilizations

Colonial empires established by the “big five” European colonizers—Portugal, Spain, England, France, and Holland:  similarities and differences

Trading Empires vrs. Settlement Empires

Influences on the mother countries

“The Columbian Exchange”

The critical role of disease in European successes and failures

Why decolonization?

 

Course Readings:

Jared M. Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel, The Fate of Human Societies

Alfred W. Crosby, The Columbian Exchange (Any edition)

Several readings posted on the web

 

Grading

Two in-class exams, 25% each

Final exam during final exam period, 25%

10 page research paper, 25% 

HIS 362K • Medieval Warfare

39675 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 2.312
show description

After a brief retrospective on war in the ancient world, this one semester course will examine in detail the development of warfare between the late Roman Empire and the early modern world (c. 400-1500), a period of some eleven centuries traditionally referred to as the Middle Ages.  The course will concentrate on what historians call the West, i.e. the lands around the Mediterranean Sea, including Europe, North Africa, and the Near East.  Lectures will also incorporate political and social background material in light of which military developments may be better understood.  The only departure from this scheme will involve the Mongols, a people of Far Eastern origin, whose territorial expansion in the 12-13th centuries was so enormous that it actually reached the West.

Grading

  • One course paper ten pages in length. (1/3 of grade)
  • Mid-term exam. (1/3 of grade)
  • Final exam. (1/3 of grade)

Texts

  • Charles W. C. Oman, The Art of War in the Middle Ages.
  • Kelly DeVries and Robert Douglas Smith, Medieval Military Technology.
  • In addition to the two books assigned in this course, several selected articles will be posted on the website which examine specific aspects of medieval military history.

HIS 306N • Intro To Hist And Cul Of Spain

39110 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.308
(also listed as AHC 310, EUS 306 )
show description

This one-semester course will explore the long history of  Spain from its beginnings in the stone age through the great social and economic upheavals of the twentieth century.  Beginning with an introduction to its geography and language, we shall touch on such topics as paleolithic settlement and art, the arrival of new groups (Celts, Greeks, Phoenicians), the Roman imperium, the Visigothic domination, the Islamic conquest and Christian reconquest (Reconquista), medieval kingdoms and their unification, the separate way of Portugal, the birth and death of  religious toleration, the rise and fall of Spain in the European state system, Hapsburg and Bourbon kings, the troubled nineteenth century and even more troubled twentieth, and finally, the emergence of one of Europe’s most democratic societies.   Wherever possible, the course will attempt to place Spain into the larger context of European and Mediterranean society.  Basic information will be conferred primarily through lectures by the professor.

Course Goals:

(1)  To provide students with a firm understanding of the history and culture of the Iberian Peninsula, in particular of  what we today call Spain.  (There will also be some treatment of that part of Spain that maintained its independence in the unifying process and is today the nation of Portugal.)

(2)  To provide some understanding of the various types of evidence available to scholars when they  undertakes to reconstruct the Spanish past

(3)  (Hopefully) To inspire in the student a further interest in the study of Spain, its people, and its history and encourage travel to an ancient and fascinating land

 

Required Reading:

Simon Barton, A History of Spain (Palgrave MacMillan, 2004).

This is the best general text on Spanish history currently available in English.  Even though it is rather "light" on periods before roughly 1000, read in conjunction with the lectures, it should supply the student with an adequate knowledge of Spain's ancient past.

If the student finds it necessary to supplement the Barton text, he/she may have access to a now out-of-print textbook written by one of the finest historians of modern Spain and available FOR FREE  on the web through LIBRO:  The Library of Iberian Resources on Line.  See:  Stanley Payne, A History of Spain and Portugal at URL:  http://libro.uca.edu/payne1/spainport1.htm

Olivia Remie Constable, Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997).

An excellent collection of sources from medieval Spain, taken from the three great religions that co-existed there as nowhere else in Europe.  (The book is dedicated to John Boswell, the man who saved my academic career.)

There are two other books on the list, both dealing with Spain in what historians designate "the modern period" (c. 1500-the present).  Depending upon where your interests lie, you may choose to read one or the other.  (Of course, I am not seeking to discourage you from reading both if you so desire!)

John Elliott, Imperial Spain 1469-1715

This classic work, written by one of the foremost historians of the twentieth century (still going strong in the twenty-first)  is still the best one volume account that covers the period from Spanish unification under the Catholic Monarchs to the end of the Hapsburg dynasty.

Richard Herr, An Historical Essay on Modern Spain

Written by a leading scholar of Spain since the Enlightenment, this work carries Spain from the establishment of the Bourbon dynasty, established at the beginning of the eighteenth century through the end of the dictatorship of Francisco Franco.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE ACROSS THE CURRICULUM INITIATIVE FOR HISTORY STUDENTS 

 THE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY IS PLEASED TO OFFER FOR THE FIRST TIME AN **OPTIONAL** ADDITIONAL ONE-HOUR CLASS FOR CREDIT IN SPANISH ATTACHED TO HISTORY 306N: INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY AND CULTURE OF SPAIN. 

Students with intermediate Spanish language skills enrolled in HIS 306N, Intro to History and Culture of Spain, may, if they choose, sign up for a supplemental one-hour class in Spanish, SPN 130D (unique 46555). Students who take this additional course will receive an additional hour's credit in Spanish from the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.  This is a unique opportunity to develop language skills in the context of historical reading. The Department of History encourages interested students to take advantage of this unique opportunity. Time and Place for SPN 130D will be determined according to student availability.

 

HIS 362G • First World War

39535 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 2.304
show description

HIS 362G • Early Western Colonialism

39515 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 2.312
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

This course (meeting three times a week) will examine the phenomenon of colonialism, in particular, its most prominent example:  the European Expansion across the globe that began at the end of the western Middle Ages and continued throughout the early modern period.  After looking at earlier colonizing efforts by western peoples, the course will concentrate on the first wave of European colonization (and decolonization) that began with the Portuguese attack on Ceuta in 1415 and ended with the revolutions of Nordfth and South America that encompassed the period from 1775 to the 1820s. 

 

Course Topics:

Earlier colonizing efforts undertaken by western peoples (Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Vikings, Crusaders)

Means and motives for European expansion:  Why Europe and not another region?

The technology behind expansion 

The clash of civilizations

Colonial empires established by the “big five” European colonizers—Portugal, Spain, England, France, and Holland:  similarities and differences

Trading Empires vrs. Settlement Empires

Influences on the mother countries

“The Columbian Exchange”

The critical role of disease in European successes and failures

Why decolonization?

 

Course Readings:

Jared M. Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel, The Fate of Human Societies

Alfred W. Crosby, The Columbian Exchange (Any edition)

Several readings posted on the web

 

Grading

Two in-class exams, 25% each

Final exam during final exam period, 25%

10 page research paper, 25% 

HIS 362K • Medieval Warfare

39540 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm BUR 212
show description

Course Description:

After a brief retrospective on war in the ancient world, this one semester course will examine in detail the development of warfare between the late Roman Empire and the early modern world (c. 400-1500), a period of some eleven centuries traditionally referred to as the Middle Ages. It will concentrate on what historians call the West, i.e. the lands around the Mediterranean Sea, including Europe, North Africa, and the Near East. Lectures will also incorporate political and social background material in light of which military developments may be better understood. The only departure from this scheme will involve the Mongols, a people of Far Eastern origin, whose territorial expansion in the 12-13th centuries was so enormous that it actually reached the West.

Texts:

Charles W. C. Oman, The Art of War in the Middle Ages (Required)Edward M. Peters, The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other Source Materials (Strongly Recommended)In addition to the two books assigned in this course, a number of articles will be posted on thewebsite which examine specific aspects of medieval military history.

HIS 309K • Western Civ In Medieval Times

39105 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as AHC 310, CTI 310, EUS 306 )
show description

Course Description:

This course will introduce students to the history and culture of that long and vibrant period in the western history known as the Middle Ages, a period extending from roughly 400-1500 A.D./C.E.  After briefly considering the Roman and Christian background, it will explore the fall of the Roman Empire in the west, then survey the primary heirs of Roman Society--the Byzantine Empire, Islam, and the Germanic successor kingdoms that gained control of Western Europe.  The course will examine the development of a medieval lifestyle and the changes within it tthat eventually pointed toward the modern world.  Throughout the approach will be broad-based, treating such diverse topics as the organization of medieval society and economy, the class structure, the warfare that characterized the period, the Church, the universities, and the rebirth of an increasingly urbanized culture toward the end of the period.  Emphasis will be placed on how the Middle Ages changed over time.  Students will learn from a combination of lectures and readings in carefully selected sources.

Topics Covered in the Course:

(1)  Background:  The Fall of Rome  (Exam 1)

    The Pax Romana

    The Long Decline

(2)  Background:  Christianity in the Roman World (Exam 2)

    Origins of Christianity

    A Period of Trial

    Triumph of Christianity

    Rise of the Roman Bishop

    Christianity and Heresy

(3)  The Early Middle Ages:  The Heirs of Rome (Exam 3)

    The Byzantine Empire and Islam

    The Triumph of the Franks

    Retreat Into Disorder

(4)  Medieval Society 1:  The Men Who Fought (Nobles, Knights) and the Men Who Worked (Peasants) (Exam 4)

    Aristocratic Lifestyle

    Feudalism

    Peasants and Manorialism

    Medieval Revolution in Agricultural Technology

    Views of the Medieval Peasant

(5)  Medieval Society 2:  The Men Who Prayed (The Medieval Church) (No Exam)

    The Medieval Church

    Spread of Christianity

    Conflict of Church and State

(6)  Medieval Society 3:  The Rise of the Bourgeoisie (The Medieval City) (Exam 5)

Course Goals:

(1)  To provide students with an understanding of the period in western history referred to as the Middle Ages (c. 400-1500).

(2)  To provide some understanding of the various types of evidence available to scholars when they  undertakes to study and reconstruct the medieval past .

(3)  (Hopefully) To inspire in the student a continuing interest in studying this fascinating period.

Course Webpage:

A webpage for Western Civilization in Medieval Times is posted on the teaching section of my website, Wire Paladinhttp://www.webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/c-MedHist-index.html  Like the rest of my teaching materials, it can be reached by accessing the website's main index, then clicking on the chess knight entitled University of  Texas Courses taught by Dr. Villalon. 

Reading List:

Class Notes

There is no textbook in this course.  Instead, basic course material will be conveyed through a series of highly-developed, easily-available lecture notes, posted on the professor’s website (Wire Paladin, located at Webring).  

In addition, study guides and several required essays containing supplemental material will also be made available on the website.  The study guide has been designed to make studying for exams far easier .  USE IT!

Readings

Student are asked to read the following books in conjunction with the lectures.  Three of them--Einhard, the Song of Roland, and Abelard's Story of my Adversities--rank among the most famous classics of medieval literature.   (The first two--Einhard and the Song of Roland--are required; the third--Abelard--is optional. )  Aside from their inherent value for understanding the Middle Ages and the sources we have for studying its history, these three works have been selected on the basis of such practical considerations as (1) reasonable length and ease of reading; (2) reasonable initial price; (3) availability on the electronic used-book market; (4) availability of good translations  on the web of the three classics--Einhard, the Song of Roland, and Abelard; and (5) possible relevance to other courses on the medieval world that students might pursue in the future.  The fourth work, written by an American professor, Lynn White, Jr., is one of the twentieth century's most innovative pieces of historical writing.

Einhard and Notker the Stammerer:  Two Lives of Charlemagne (Penguin Classics).  Two very different approaches to historical writing in the Middle Ages.  Although relatively brief, Einhard's chronicle of Charlemagne is one of the finest pieces of historical writing produced during the period.  On the other hand, Notker's history of the reign shows some of the significant problems that characterize much of medieval historical writing, especially that which came out of the monasteries.  (Note:  the work may also be listed as Einhard and the Monk of St. Gall:  Two Lives of Charlemagne.  As part of his excellent introduction, the editor makes the argument that the two are one and the same.  While Einhard is available on the web, Notker is not.)

The Song of Roland (Penguin Classics).  One of  the most famous medieval epics or, as they were called by people of the period, Chansons de Geste (Songs of Deeds).  It not only illustrates the ideal of chivalric warfare, but also demonstrates how history can be twisted to fit the author's intent.  (Hollywood has nothing on the Middle Ages!)  (The Song of Roland is also available on the web.)

Peter Abelard, The Story of my Adversities.  One of the great autobiographies in history, it is the very revealing tale of an individual who became one of the major intellectual figures of the twelfth century and whose principal writing, Sic et Non, would help give rise to medieval scholasticism.  (Abelard's story is

Lynn White, Jr.,  Medieval Technology and Social Change (Oxford University Press).  The only assigned reading that is not a medieval source, it is a major piece of twentieth century historical writing emphasizing the importance of technological change in the Middle Ages and combating the long-held view of the period as one without progress.

How the readings are related to the course and to the exams:  The readings are designed primarily to provide a student with a knowledge of several classics of medieval literature and, in the case of White's book, to demonstrate how the period was one of technological change.  While most of each exam will be taken from the posted notes and supplemental essays, in several cases a short section may be based on the readings. 

 

Criteria for Grading:

(1)  Examinations (the major criterion):

     a.  Four in-class examinations (a separate exam for each of topics 1-4)

     b.  The final exam (this exam will not be comprehensive; it will cover only topic 6.  There is no exam on topic 5.

(2)  Written component consisting of a short research paper

(3)  Notable participation will be given some consideration in awarding the grade.

The examinations are entirely short answer (matching, fill-in-the-blank from a list supplied on the exam; true or false).  Students who are simply willing to sit down and learn the material should not find them particularly difficult.  It is the short short paper (5-7 pages) that will provide an opportunity for creativity.

NOTE WELL: Except in extraordinarily rare cases, all work must be completed and handed in to receive a grade other than X or F.

(Do not assume that by simply taking exams and doing well on them, you will have done enough to pass the course and will therefore not have to do the paper.  This is simply not the case.)

 

Grading Procedure:

The grades in this class are computed using  + and -; in other words, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, F.    Unfortunately, however, the University of Texas does not at present have a +/- system in place.  This permits much less flexibility in the professor's ability to assign grades truly representative of the student's work.  Grades will not be rounded upward; in other words, a B+ is a B+, not an A-; therefore, it appears on the student's transcript as a B.

HIS 350L • Genealogy And History

39345 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm BEN 1.108
show description

Course Description:

Genealogy is that part of history that traces family relationships over time.  Most people are interested in finding out where they have come from, who their ancestors were, and what those ancestors did.  In the past, such a search often required extensive effort, including widespread travel or considerable expense or both.  The most readily available sources of information were those in possession of the family itself, including such things as letters, diaries, diplomas, birth and death certificates, inscribed family bibles, old photographs or home movies, newspaper clippings, and, of course, word of mouth.  Other sources such as court records, social security information, police reports, city registries, passenger manifests, and records of military service were housed in libraries, archives or government repositories, many of them far removed from the locale in which the researcher was working.  At the very least, this necessitated  time-consuming correspondence by snail mail.  Often it was necessary to travel far and wide or alternatively to hire genealogical consultants.  Today, thanks primarily to the web and email, it has become far easier to conduct a genealogical search into the history of one’s family.  This course will teach students who have an interest in learning about their families the principles of genealogical research in the twenty-first century.  Each student will apply those principles to researching his or her own family history and where possible, placing family members into a larger historical context.

 

Course Goals:

(1)  To provide students with an adequate understanding of  how genealogical research (a branch of historical research) is conducted.

(2)  To provide an understanding of the various types of evidence available to scholars when they  undertake to reconstruct a family's past.

(3)  (Hopefully) To inspire in the student a further interest in the study of genealogy, which, for some, becomes a lifelong obsession.

 

Course Webpage:

A webpage for Genealogy and History appears on the teaching section of my website, Wire Paladin http://www.webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/.  Like the rest of my teaching materials, it can be reached by accessing the site's main index, then clicking on the chess knight entitled University of  Texas Courses taught by Dr. Villalon. 

 

Required Course Materials:

A.  To Purchase:

1.    Matthew Helm, et al., Genealogy Online for Dummies.

Despite its very "un-academic" title, this is an excellent, inexpensive, and easily available book that will serve as the required text in this course.   As the title indicates, it centers around how to do genealogy on the web, which is where all students will start.

Since Genealogy Online for Dummies is updated virtually every year,  the book has gone through a number of editions, many of which are still available on the web.  While no specific edition is being assigned, try to get as recent an edition as your pocketbook will allow.

A word to the wise:  If you are particularly interested in the exciting new procedure of genealogical DNA testing, the 2009 edition of Genealogy Online for Dummies is the first one to devote a chapter to the subject.

2.    Recent version of a major genealogical program.

While there are several on the market, the most widely-known is Family Tree Maker, a product of the same company that has created Ancestry.com..  A very useful instruction book and access to several critical genealogical sites comes with the package.

To find an alternate program, go to one of the major genealogical sites, Cyndi's List (URL:http://www.cyndislist.com), and access the section on Software and Computers.  From there, browse the appropriate links, in particular Genealogy Software Programs.

If you are a Mac user, you will have to find a different genealogical program since Family Tree Maker does not produce a Mac-friendly version.   Again, go to Cyndi's List (URL: http://www.cyndislist.com), access Software and Computers, then follow the link to Macintosh Software.  Alternatively, type into Google "Genealogical software for Mac".

3.   A subscription to Ancestry.com.

This is the major commercial genealogical site on the web.  It supplies fairly easy access to a list of web sources that is growing every day.  Students who take this course almost always rank it as the most valuable site that they use.

Unfortunately, there is no such thing as an institutional membership; consequently, you will not be able to get it through the University of Texas libraries.  You will have to purchase a membership (or, if you know someone who has already done so, arrange to use theirs.)  Memberships can be purchased for various time periods; for example, by the month.  I would recommend for students taking a semester course a 3-month subscription.  Perhaps several of you can make arrangements to "double-up."

B.   Assorted FREE web sources on genealogy either posted directly on the professor’s website or freely accessible on the web 

For required (but free) Web Texts, access URL:  http://webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/c-Genealogy-Readings.html 

Important Genealogical Web Sources

To aid students in their search, a  web sources page has been compiled, containing some of the most useful websites

See:  http://webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/c-Genealogy-Websources.html

Criteria for Grading:

See the section of the website entitled Paper and Portfolio.

In addition to the written requirements listed in that section, participation will be of considerable importance in this class.  This can take the form of contributing relevant information, asking good questions, helping your fellow students find their family information, discussing in office hours, etc.   This course will be what all scholarship should be--cooperative rather than competitive.

HIS 362G • First World War

39830 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 2.312
show description

This course will examine the traumatic conflagration of 1914-18 that set the stage for the violent twentieth century. Once called "The Great War" by the generation that fought it, it was optimistically dubbed by some "the War to End All Wars." When it failed to achieve this noble goal and military conflict again rocked the world during the 1940s, the earlier struggle was rechristened World War I or the First World War, names by which it has been known ever since. This one-semester course will utilize lectures, readings, poetry, photographs, and film to *trace back into the 19th century the social,diplomatic, and military threads that ultimately combined to produce the First World War *explore the successive crises of the early 20th century leading up to the decisive events of 1914 that set the conflict in motion *examine in depth the course of the war, its effect upon the various participants, the evolution of military technology which it inspired, the profound social and economic changes which it wrought, and the life of the millions who were involved either on the battlefield or on the homefront *consider the outcome of the war and its many repercussions for the history of the twentieth century.

Texts

CLASS NOTES: compiled from the lectures and provided on the website; they will be the principal basis of the three exams

E. M. Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front (the classic World War I novel)

Robert Graves, Goodbye to All That (the most famous WW1 memoir) (extensive selections)

Short selections, including documents and poetry. Required Films: Paths of Glory and Gallipoli

Grading Policy

Grades will be based primarily on two examinations during the term, a non-cumulative final examination, and a short paper (8-10 pages) on a subject of the student's choosing. (Discussion and class contributions will also be taken into consideration.) 

HIS 362K • Medieval Warfare

39865 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ B0.306
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This one semester course will examine the development of warfare between the last Roman Empire and the early modern world (c. 400-1500). It will concentrate on the lands around the Mediterranean including northern and eastern Europe. Students will become acquainted with developments in warfare over the course of more than a millenium through the use of lectures and discussions, readings, photographs, and video. Among other things this course will examine the following topics: the collapse of the Roman military the advent of feudalism the rise of cavalry and its disputed connection to feudalism infantry in medieval warfare the birth of knighthood and chivalry evolving Christian and Muslim views of Just War the Crusades and Crusading orders (such as Knights Templar) the medieval castle and the race between fortifiers and attackers medieval arms and armor the influence of improved missile weapons on medieval warfare the gunpowder revolution of the later Middle Ages.

Texts

Class notes: compiled from the lectures and provided on the website will be the basis for the quizzes. Charles Oman, The Art of War in the Middle Ages. Articles and documentary selections.

Grading

Grades will be based primarily on a research paper into some aspect of medieval warfare and a number of weekly quizzes, of which the student will be expected to take half. Discussion and class contribution will also will be taken into consideration.

HIS 309K • Western Civ In Medieval Times

39025 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as AHC 310 )
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WESTERN CIVILIZATION IN MEDIEVAL TIMES

General Information:

(1)  Course title:   Western Civilization in Medieval Times

(2)  Semester:  Fall, 2010

(3)  Professor:  L. J. Andrew Villalon  (Dr. V; Mr. V)

(4)  Course number(s):  HIS 309K; AHC 310

(5)  Course section:   Section taught by Professor Villalon

(6)  Days/Time of Class Meeting:   M-W-F/12-1 p.m. 

(7)  Classroom:    WEL 2.304

(8)  Campus Office: GAR 4.120

(9)  History Departmental Office: First Floor of GAR (Right of the Buildings Main Entrance)

(10)  Office Phone:  (512) 475-8004

(11)  Departmental Phone:  (512) 471-3261

(12)  Office Hours:  M: 2-3  W: 1:45-3:00; F: 1:45-3:30.  (Also available Monday,  5-6; however, controlled access to the 4th floor at this time requires phoning the professor's office before or upon arrival).

(13)  Email Address:  avillalon@austin.rr.com

(14)  Name of professor's website on which all UT course materials appear:  WIRE PALADIN URL:  http://www.webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/

15)  Webpage URL for this course:  http://www.webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/c-MedHist-index.html

(If you do not have available the URL to my website, you can still find it easily by typing into Google "Andrew Villalon Wire Paladin".  The website should come up as the first entry on the list.  You can then click through to it.)

Course Description:

This course will introduce students to the history and culture of that long and vibrant period in the western history known as the Middle Ages, a period extending from roughly 400-1500 A.D./C.E.  After briefly considering the Roman and Christian background, it will explore the fall of the Roman Empire in the west, then survey the primary heirs of Roman Society--the Byzantine Empire, Islam, and the Germanic successor kingdoms that gained control of Western Europe.  The course will examine the development of a medieval lifestyle and the changes within it tthat eventually pointed toward the modern world.  Throughout the approach will be broad-based, treating such diverse topics as the organization of medieval society and economy, the class structure, the warfare that characterized the period, the Church, the universities, and the rebirth of an increasingly urbanized culture toward the end of the period.  Emphasis will be placed on how the Middle Ages changed over time.  Students will learn from a combination of lectures and readings in carefully selected sources.

Topics Covered in the Course:

(1)  Background:  The Fall of Rome  (Exam 1)

    The Pax Romana

    The Long Decline

(2)  Background:  Christianity in the Roman World (Exam 2)

    Origins of Christianity

    A Period of Trial

    Triumph of Christianity

    Rise of the Roman Bishop

    Christianity and Heresy

(3)  The Early Middle Ages:  The Heirs of Rome (Exam 3)

    The Byzantine Empire and Islam

    The Triumph of the Franks

    Retreat Into Disorder

(4)  Medieval Society 1:  The Men Who Fought (Nobles, Knights) and the Men Who Worked (Peasants) (Exam 4)

    Aristocratic Lifestyle

    Feudalism

    Peasants and Manorialism

    Medieval Revolution in Agricultural Technology

    Views of the Medieval Peasant

(5)  Medieval Society 2:  The Men Who Prayed (The Medieval Church) (No Exam)

    The Medieval Church

    Spread of Christianity

    Conflict of Church and State

(6)  Medieval Society 3:  The Rise of the Bourgeoisie (The Medieval City) (Exam 5)

Course Goals:

(1)  To provide students with an understanding of the period in western history referred to as the Middle Ages (c. 400-1500).

(2)  To provide some understanding of the various types of evidence available to scholars when they  undertakes to study and reconstruct the medieval past .

(3)  (Hopefully) To inspire in the student a continuing interest in studying this fascinating period.

Course Webpage:

A webpage for Western Civilization in Medieval Times is posted on the teaching section of my website, Wire Paladin (see above for the URL).  Like the rest of my teaching materials, it can be reached by accessing the website's main index, then clicking on the chess knight entitled University of  Texas Courses taught by Dr. Villalon. 

Throughout the term, this webpage may undergo occasional updating. You are responsible for periodically consulting it to see if anything new has been posted.  If you are reading this syllabus, you are already aware that it is also posted on the webpage.  Your first assignment is to READ THIS SYLLABUS CAREFULLY.

Reading List:

Class Notes

There is no textbook in this course.  Instead, basic course material will be conveyed through a series of highly-developed, easily-available lecture notes, posted on the professor’s website (Wire Paladin, located at Webring).  

In addition, study guides and several required essays containing supplemental material will also be made available on the website.  The study guide has been designed to make studying for exams far easier .  USE IT!

Readings

Student are asked to read the following books in conjunction with the lectures.  Three of them--Einhard, the Song of Roland, and Abelard's Story of my Adversities--rank among the most famous classics of medieval literature.   (The first two--Einhard and the Song of Roland--are required; the third--Abelard--is optional. )  Aside from their inherent value for understanding the Middle Ages and the sources we have for studying its history, these three works have been selected on the basis of such practical considerations as (1) reasonable length and ease of reading; (2) reasonable initial price; (3) availability on the electronic used-book market; (4) availability of good translations  on the web of the three classics--Einhard, the Song of Roland, and Abelard; and (5) possible relevance to other courses on the medieval world that students might pursue in the future.  The fourth work, written by an American professor, Lynn White, Jr., is one of the twentieth century's most innovative pieces of historical writing.

Einhard and Notker the Stammerer:  Two Lives of Charlemagne (Penguin Classics).  Two very different approaches to historical writing in the Middle Ages.  Although relatively brief, Einhard's chronicle of Charlemagne is one of the finest pieces of historical writing produced during the period.  On the other hand, Notker's history of the reign shows some of the significant problems that characterize much of medieval historical writing, especially that which came out of the monasteries.  (Note:  the work may also be listed as Einhard and the Monk of St. Gall:  Two Lives of Charlemagne.  As part of his excellent introduction, the editor makes the argument that the two are one and the same.  While Einhard is available on the web, Notker is not.)

The Song of Roland (Penguin Classics).  One of  the most famous medieval epics or, as they were called by people of the period, Chansons de Geste (Songs of Deeds).  It not only illustrates the ideal of chivalric warfare, but also demonstrates how history can be twisted to fit the author's intent.  (Hollywood has nothing on the Middle Ages!)  (The Song of Roland is also available on the web.)

Peter Abelard, The Story of my Adversities.  One of the great autobiographies in history, it is the very revealing tale of an individual who became one of the major intellectual figures of the twelfth century and whose principal writing, Sic et Non, would help give rise to medieval scholasticism.  (Abelard's story is

Lynn White, Jr.,  Medieval Technology and Social Change (Oxford University Press).  The only assigned reading that is not a medieval source, it is a major piece of twentieth century historical writing emphasizing the importance of technological change in the Middle Ages and combating the long-held view of the period as one without progress.

How the readings are related to the course and to the exams:  The readings are designed primarily to provide a student with a knowledge of several classics of medieval literature and, in the case of White's book, to demonstrate how the period was one of technological change.  While most of each exam will be taken from the posted notes and supplemental essays, in several cases a short section may be based on the readings. 

Contacting the Professor:

There are three very reliable ways to contact this professor:

(1)  Speak with the professor either before or after class.   If the subject requires a lengthier conversation, an appointment can be made to meet during office hours or communicate by  means of email.

(2)  Come to the professor's office during office hours (see above).

No appointment is needed; I am almost always available in my office (or very nearby) during office hours.   If you do not at first find me, try down the hall in the departmental office, especially around the photocopying machines.  If,  for whatever reason, I have to miss office hours, something that does not happen often, then  I shall try to leave a note on the door.  If that occurs, let me apologize in advance.  

(3)  Contact the professor through email.

I  check and respond to my email regularly and I will try to reply to your message as soon as I get it.  It is always best to send messages to my home email address (given above) where I look at my email several times a day.

Other means of getting in contact are much less certain.  I have purposely omitted my home telephone number from this syllabus for the simple reason that I will not wish to receive student phone calls at home.   Email serves the same purpose, more reliably and less obtrusively

Criteria for Grading:

(1)  Examinations (the major criterion):

     a.  Four in-class examinations (a separate exam for each of topics 1-4)

     b.  The final exam (this exam will not be comprehensive; it will cover only topic 6.  There is no exam on topic 5.

(2)  Written component consisting of a short research paper

(3)  Notable participation will be given some consideration in awarding the grade.

The examinations are entirely short answer (matching, fill-in-the-blank from a list supplied on the exam; true or false).  Students who are simply willing to sit down and learn the material should not find them particularly difficult.  It is the short short paper (5-7 pages) that will provide an opportunity for creativity.

NOTE WELL: Except in extraordinarily rare cases, all work must be completed and handed in to receive a grade other than X or F.

(Do not assume that by simply taking exams and doing well on them, you will have done enough to pass the course and will therefore not have to do the paper.  This is simply not the case.)

 

Grading Procedure:

The grades in this class are computed using  + and -; in other words, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, F.    Unfortunately, however, the University of Texas does not at present have a +/- system in place.  This permits much less flexibility in the professor's ability to assign grades truly representative of the student's work.  Grades will not be rounded upward; in other words, a B+ is a B+, not an A-; therefore, it appears on the student's transcript as a B.

Concerning the Finality of Grades:

In most cases, final grades are indeed final.  The obvious exception:  if  I have made a mistake in computing your grade.  If you believe this to be the case, you should contact me or the TA immediately. 

Instructions for Students Who Fail to Receive a Grade:

While this is usually the result of a failure to complete some part of the course work, it may also be an error on the professor's part.  Under any circumstances, the student should contact the professor as soon as possible and arrange a meeting in order to determine what, if anything, can be done about the problem.   In most cases, something can be done.

Retaining Copies of Work:

It is a good practice in any course to keep copies of everything that you have handed in.  It is also a good practice to retain any work that is handed back  until you have received your (correct) final grade in the course.  Mistakes happen, especially in a large class.  Items get lost and errors are made in recording grades.  In such instances, the student cannot merely claim to have done the work.  He/she must be able to produce it.

Attendance:

Attendance is computed on the basis of how many times the student has signed the attendance sheet which circulates in each class.

Consequently, students who wish to have their attendance correctly recorded have two responsibilities.

(1)  They must sign the attendance sheet for the class.

(2)  If the professor forgets to circulate an attendance sheet (as sometimes happens), students should raise their hand and remind him.  (Such an interruption will always be most welcome.)

Attendance in any course is important, but it is particularly important when that course is based heavily upon both in-class lectures and, to a lesser extent, in-class discussion.  Although I provide fairly detailed notes of what is discussed in each class, THE STUDENT IS EXPECTED TO ATTEND ON A REGULAR BASIS.   No habitual failure to attend is acceptable, regardless of the reason.  While this may seem old-fashioned, I am a firm believer that part of a student's responsibility is to attend class.  Gross failure to attend will almost certainly be taken into consideration in the final grade; and the professor reserves the right to deny a student a grade if the attendance is poor enough.

Furthermore, students should never skip a class simply because they feel unprepared.  After all, you might miss something interesting or useful!  Besides, there are no unannounced quizes and I never seek to embarrass unprepared students. 

Classroom Deportment:

Although I do not appreciate students who sleep, read, draw pictures or do work for other courses during classtime, I very rarely reprimand them in class for their sins.  Such offenses against the "academic order" may lead to a private discussion between us; and, if severe enough, may be taken into consideration when I award a final grade for the course.  (Remember, as a historian, I have a very long memory!!) 

Talking in class is a different matter:  a chronic talker may be asked to leave the class or, in severe cases, to bring a withdrawal slip for me to sign.  Furthermore, please do not start packing up your things to leave until the class actually ends.  This class never gets out early.  (To the chagrin of some students, it has even been known upon occasion to get out late, though I honestly try to minimize such intrusions into the student's time.)

Cheating or Plagiarism:

Everybody knows what cheating is, so there is no need for a definition. 

On the other hand, some of you may not be familiar with the word plagiarism.  It refers to any attempt to pass off as your own work something done by somebody else.  Even when only part of a paper is copied from the work of another person, this is still plagiarism.  While it is perfectly acceptable to quote from another person’s work, such passages must be carefully footnoted.

Both the university and I regard cheating and plagiarism as extremely serious; as a result, I would recommend that you avoid them like the plague throughout your college career and, for that matter, afterwards.  Although I shall treat both cheating and plagiarism on a case-by-case basis, the offender should not expect leniency.  A substantial lowering of the final grade or even expulsion from the course are the normal penalties for such offenses.

Cheating takes various forms:  any student caught signing the attendance sheet for another student will be penalized a full letter grade (from an A to a B, a B to a C, etc.)  So will the student whose name he/she signed, unless the latter can demonstrate to my satisfaction that he/she had no involvement.  If  this flagrant piece of dishonesty reoccurs several times, the student(s) involved will be asked to leave the course.

Withdrawal from the Course:

If you receive an F on several of  the early tests), you should seriously consider dropping the course IMMEDIATELY and concentrating your efforts in another course which you have a better chance of passing!

As far as I am concerned, a student wishing to withdraw from the course for whatever reason will be allowed to do so without penalty, even if he/she is failing the course at the time of the withdrawal.  It has always been my belief that losing time and tuition is enough of a penalty to pay for doing poorly in a course.

However, I would strongly recommend to all students that once they have decided to withdraw, they should do so as soon as possible.  It is always best to get this unpleasant task out of the way. 

First of all, it is better to drop a “loser” and concentrate one’s energies where they will they will do the most good, i.e. in courses where one is doing well.

Secondly, in putting off the inevitable, some students wait too long and pass withdrawal dates mandated by the university, after which withdrawing may become far more complicated, if not impossible.  While I am always willing to approve a withdrawal, after a certain point in time, the university may not accept it.

Requirements and Student Complaints:

Within any academic discipline, a teacher tries to design a course which will present a body of knowledge, while developing critical thinking and skills in research and writing.  He or she then evaluates carefully each student's performance in order to arrive at a grade, which will count toward college credit.  Factors which the teacher may take into consideration when defining student performance include such things as exams (either in-class or take-home), other written work (papers, book reviews, journals), and various forms of classroom participation (discussion, oral presentations, answering questions).  Each teacher will determine which of these factors to employ in arriving at a grade, as well as their relative importance.  The student should also be aware that classroom deportment may be taken into consideration; in other words, anyone who habitually acts in a manner which tends to disrupt the learning process may well find that fact reflected in his or her grade.

In the end, it is the student who earns the grade is earned by the student, for demonstrating the required knowledge and  performing the required work within reasonable deadlines set by the teacher.  Failure on the part of a student to accomplish this may result in a failing grade and the withholding of academic credit for the course.  Again, let me emphasize:  grades are earned, not given or negotiated!!

On the other hand, for students who believe that they have been unfairly evaluated, the University of Texas  has established a grievance procedure.  Grade appeals must be made in accordance with that procedure, which mandates as its first step an attempt by the student and professor to resolve the grievance without any outside interference.  At this point in the procedure, intervention by third parties such as parents, boyfriends, attorneys, department heads, administrators or other faculty members is inappropriate.  If, after consultation with the faculty member, the student wishes to pursue the grievance, he or she should contact the department head. [For further information concerning the grievance procedure, see the university handbook which should be available at every college office.]

 

Brief Academic Biography of the Professor:

L. J. Andrew Villalon did his undergraduate work at Yale University where he earned honors in history and was elected a member of Phi Beta Kappa.  He received his PhD. from that institution in 1984.  After many years at the University of Cincinnati, where he is now a professor emeritus, Villalon is currently a senior lecturer at the University of Texas at Austin. A specialist in late medieval and early modern European history, he has delivered numerous conference papers on such topics as Pedro “the Cruel”, Don Carlos “the unhappy prince of Spain," Spanish involvement in the Hundred Years War and the battle of Najera, Sir Hugh Calveley, the political ideas of Niccolo Machiavelli, English military pardons in the Hundred Years War, and academic editing. His articles have appeared in collections and various academic journals including The Catholic Historical Review, Sixteenth Century Journal, Mediterranean Studies, and the Proceedings of the Ohio Academy of History. Currently, he is working on two book length studies, one on the canonization of San Diego, the other on the life of Sir Hugh Calveley, an English knight and mercenary soldier in the Hundred Years War. Villalon has co-edited with Donald J. Kagay five collections of medieval essays—The Final Argument:  The Imprint of Violence on Society in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (The Boydell Press, 1998); The Circle of War in the Middle Ages:  Essays on Medieval Military and Naval History (The Boydell Press, 1999); Crusaders, Condottieri, and Cannon : Medieval Warfare in Societies around the Mediterranean (Brill, 2002); The Hundred Years War: A Wider Focus (Brill, 2005); and The Hundred Years War: New Vistas (Brill, 2008).  At present, the pair are working on a third volume of their Hundred Years War collection and are collaborating on a joint monograph concerning the battle of Najera (1367). In addition to research in his major field, Villalon has published on automotive history and the history of World War I.  He has held several grants for study in Spain, including a Fulbright; received two awards from the American Association of University Professors for defending academic freedom; and in 2001, was presented the Professional-Scholarly Activity Award for the University College at the University of Cincinnati.  Villalon was the vice president of the Texas Medieval Association (TEMA) in 2007-2008 and president of that organization in 2008-2009.  While serving as president, he organized TEMA’s annual conference which was held that year in Austin.  He is an associate editor of the Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology put out by Oxford in 2009.  (A complete c.v. is available on the website.)

This course contains a Global Cultures flag.

HIS 350L • Genealogy And History

39255 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm WAG 201
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GENEALOGY AND HISTORY 

General Information:

(1)  Course title:    Genealogy and History
(2)  Semester:  Fall
(3)  Professor:  L. J. Andrew Villalon  (Dr. V; Professor V; Mr. V)
(4)  Course number:  350L (40270)
(5)  Course Section:  Only one
(6)  Days/Time of meeting:  M and W:  3:30-5 p. m.
(7)  Classroom:  WAG
(8)  Campus Office:  GAR 4.120
(9)  History Departmental Office, First Floor of GAR (To the right of the Main Entrance)
(10)  Office Phone:  (512) 475-8004
(11)  Departmental Phone:  (512) 471-3261
(12)  Office Hours:  M: 2-3  W: 1:45-3:00; F: 1:45-3:30.  (Also available Monday from  5-6; however, controlled
access to the 4th floor at this time requires phoning the professor's office before or upon arrival in order to have the doors opened).
(13)  Email Address:  avillalon@austin.rr.com
(14)  Name of professor's website on which all UT course materials appear:  WIRE PALADIN URL:  http://www.webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/
15)  Webpage URL for this course:  http://www.webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/c-MedHist-index.html

(If you do not have available the URL to my website, you can still find it easily by typing into Google "Andrew Villalon Wire Paladin".  The website should come up as the first entry on the list.  You can then click through to it.)

Course Description:

Genealogy is that part of history that traces family relationships over time.  Most people are interested in finding out where they have come from, who their ancestors were, and what those ancestors did.  In the past, such a search often required extensive effort, including widespread travel or considerable expense or both.  The most readily available sources of information were those in possession of the family itself, including such things as letters, diaries, diplomas, birth and death certificates, inscribed family bibles, old photographs or home movies, newspaper clippings, and, of course, word of mouth.  Other sources such as court records, social security information, police reports, city registries, passenger manifests, and records of military service were housed in libraries, archives or government repositories, many of them far removed from the locale in which the researcher was working.  At the very least, this necessitated  time-consuming correspondence by snail mail.  Often it was necessary to travel far and wide or alternatively to hire genealogical consultants.  Today, thanks primarily to the web and email, it has become far easier to conduct a genealogical search into the history of one’s family.  This course will teach students who have an interest in learning about their families the principles of genealogical research in the twenty-first century.  Each student will apply those principles to researching his or her own family history and where possible, placing family members into a larger historical context.

Course Goals:

(1)  To provide students with an adequate understanding of  how genealogical research (a branch of historical research) is conducted.

(2)  To provide an understanding of the various types of evidence available to scholars when they  undertake to reconstruct a family's past.

(3)  (Hopefully) To inspire in the student a further interest in the study of genealogy, which, for some, becomes a lifelong obsession.

Contacting the Professor:

There are three very reliable ways to contact this professor:

(1)  Speak with him after class.   If the subject requires a lengthier conversation, an appointment can be made to meet during office hours or communicate by  means of email.

(2)  Come to his office during office hours (for the schedule, see above).

No appointment is needed; I am almost always available in my office (or very nearby) during office hours.   If you do not at first find me, try (1)  the third floor room restricted to faculty where the printer and photocopying machines are located; (2) the main office on the first floor.

(3)  Contact him through email.

I  check and respond to my email regularly.  I will try to reply to your message as soon as I see it.  Emails should be sent to my home address given above. 

Other means of getting in contact are much less certain.  I have purposely omitted my home telephone number from this syllabus for the simple reason that I do not wish to receive student phone calls at home.   Email serves the same purpose, more reliably and less obtrusively.

Course Webpage:

A webpage for Genealogy and History appears on the teaching section of my website, Wire Paladin (see above for the URL).  Like the rest of my teaching materials, it can be reached by accessing the site's main index, then clicking on the chess knight entitled University of  Texas Courses taught by Dr. Villalon. 

Throughout the term, the webpage will undergo updating. You are responsible for periodically consulting the website to see if anything new has been posted.  If you are reading this syllabus, you are already aware that it is also posted on the webpage.  Your first assignment is to READ THIS SYLLABUS CAREFULLY.

Required Course Materials:

A.  To Purchase:

1.    Matthew Helm, et al., Genealogy Online for Dummies.

Despite its very "un-academic" title, this is an excellent, inexpensive, and easily available book that will serve as the required text in this course.   As the title indicates, it centers around how to do genealogy on the web, which is where all students will start.

Since Genealogy Online for Dummies is updated virtually every year,  the book has gone through a number of editions, many of which are still available on the web.  While no specific edition is being assigned, try to get as recent an edition as your pocketbook will allow.

A word to the wise:  If you are particularly interested in the exciting new procedure of genealogical DNA testing, the 2009 edition of Genealogy Online for Dummies is the first one to devote a chapter to the subject.

2.    Recent version of a major genealogical program.

While there are several on the market, the most widely-known is Family Tree Maker, a product of the same company that has created Ancestry.com..  A very useful instruction book and access to several critical genealogical sites comes with the package.

To find an alternate program, go to one of the major genealogical sites, Cyndi's List (URL:http://www.cyndislist.com), and access the section on Software and Computers.  From there, browse the appropriate links, in particular Genealogy Software Programs.

If you are a Mac user, you will have to find a different genealogical program since Family Tree Maker does not produce a Mac-friendly version.   Again, go to Cyndi's List (URL: http://www.cyndislist.com), access Software and Computers, then follow the link to Macintosh Software.  Alternatively, type into Google "Genealogical software for Mac".

3.   A subscription to Ancestry.com.

This is the major commercial genealogical site on the web.  It supplies fairly easy access to a list of web sources that is growing every day.  Students who take this course almost always rank it as the most valuable site that they use.

Unfortunately, there is no such thing as an institutional membership; consequently, you will not be able to get it through the University of Texas libraries.  You will have to purchase a membership (or, if you know someone who has already done so, arrange to use theirs.)  Memberships can be purchased for various time periods; for example, by the month.  I would recommend for students taking a semester course a 3-month subscription.  Perhaps several of you can make arrangements to "double-up."

B.   Assorted FREE web sources on genealogy either posted directly on the professor’s website or freely accessible on the web 

For required (but free) Web Texts, access URL:  http://webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/c-Genealogy-Readings.html

Important Genealogical Web Sources

To aid students in their search, a  web sources page has been compiled, containing some of the most useful websites
See:  http://webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/c-Genealogy-Websources.html

Criteria for Grading:

See the section of the website entitled Paper and Portfolio.

In addition to the written requirements listed in that section, participation will be of considerable importance in this class.  This can take the form of contributing relevant information, asking good questions, helping your fellow students find their family information, discussing in office hours, etc.   This course will be what all scholarship should be--cooperative rather than competitive.

Retaining Copies of Work and Work handed back:

It is a good practice in any course to keep copies of everything that you have handed in.  It is also a good practice to retain any work that is handed back  until you have received your (correct) final grade in the course.  Mistakes happen, and even though they are more frequent in a large class, they happen in small classes as well.   Items get lost and errors are made in recording grades.  In such instances, the student cannot merely claim to have done the work.  He/she must be able to produce it.

Instructions for Students Who do not receive a grade:

This is almost certainly the result of a failure to complete some part of the course work.  The student should contact the professor as soon as possible and arrange a meeting in order to determine what can be done about the problem.   In most cases, something can be done.

Concerning the Finality of Grades:

In most cases, final grades are indeed final.  The obvious exception:  if  I have made a mistake in computing your grade, in which case you should contact me immediately.  In rare instances, usually where a student's grade is borderline, I may let that individual something to improve the grade.  

Attendance:

Attendance is required!!!

Attendance in any course is important, but it is particularly important when that course is based heavily upon in-class lectures and discussion and where participation plays an important role.  Failure to attend will be taken into consideration in assigning the final grade; and the professor reserves the right to deny a student a passing grade if the attendance is poor enough..

Consequently, students who wish to have their attendance correctly recorded have two responsibilities.

(1)  They must sign the attendance sheet for the class.
(2)  If the professor forgets to circulate an attendance sheet (as sometimes happens), students should raise their hand and remind him.  (Such an interruption will always be most welcome.)

Students should never skip a class simply because they feel unprepared.  After all, you might miss something interesting or useful!  Besides, there are no unannounced quizes and I never seek to embarrass unprepared students. 

Cheating or Plagiarism:

Everybody knows what cheating is, so there is no need for a definition. 

On the other hand, some of you may not be familiar with the word plagiarism.  It refers to any attempt to pass off as your own work something done by somebody else.  Even when only part of a paper is copied from the work of another person, this is still plagiarism.  While it is perfectly acceptable to quote from another person’s work, such passages must be carefully footnoted.

Both the university and I regard cheating and plagiarism as extremely serious; as a result, I would recommend that you avoid them like the plague throughout your college career and, for that matter, afterwards.  Although I shall treat both cheating and plagiarism on a

Withdrawal from the Course:

As far as I am concerned, a student wishing to withdraw from the course for whatever reason will be allowed to do so without penalty, even if he/she is failing the course at the time of the withdrawal.  It has always been my belief that losing time and tuition is enough of a penalty to pay for doing poorly in a course.

However, I would strongly recommend to all students that once they have decided to withdraw, they should do so as soon as possible.  It is always best to get this unpleasant task out of the way. 

First of all, it is better to drop a “loser” and concentrate one’s energies where they will they will do the most good, i.e. in courses where one is doing well.

Secondly, in putting off the inevitable, some students wait too long and pass withdrawal dates mandated by the university, after which withdrawing may become far more complicated, if not impossible.  While I am always willing to approve a withdrawal, after a certain point in time, the university may not accept it.

Grading Procedures and Student Complaints:

Within any academic discipline, a teacher tries to design a course which will present a body of knowledge, while developing critical thinking and skills in research and writing.  He or she then evaluates carefully each student's performance in order to arrive at a grade, which will count toward college credit.  Factors which a professor may take into consideration when defining student performance include such things as exams (either in-class or take-home), other written work (papers, book reviews, journals), and various forms of classroom participation (discussion, oral presentations, answering questions).  Each individual teacher will determine which of these factors to employ in arriving at a grade, as well as their relative importance.  The student should also be aware that classroom deportment may be taken into consideration; in other words, anyone who habitually acts in a manner which tends to disrupt the learning process may well find that fact reflected in his or her grade.

In any class worth the name, a grade is earned by the student, for demonstrating the required knowledge and ability and performing the work within the deadlines set by the instructor.  Failure on the part of a student to demonstrate adequate knowledge and/or to meet reasonable academic guidelines (as defined by the instructor) may result in a failing grade and the withholding of academic credit for the course.  Again, let me emphasize:  grades are earned, not given or negotiated!!

On the other hand, for students who believe that they have been unfairly evaluated, the University of Texas  has established grievance procedures.  Grade appeals must be made in accordance with that procedure, which mandates as its first step an attempt by the student and professor to resolve the grievance without any outside interference.  At this point in the procedure, intervention by third parties such as parents, boyfriends, attorneys, department heads, administrators or other faculty members is inappropriate.  If, after consultation with the faculty member, the student wishes to pursue the grievance, he or she should contact the department head. [For further information concerning the grievance procedure, see the university handbook which should be available at every college office.]

Brief Biography of this Professor:

L. J. Andrew Villalon did his undergraduate work at Yale University where he earned honors in history and was elected a member of Phi Beta Kappa.  He received his PhD. from that institution in 1984.  After many years at the University of Cincinnati, where he is now a professor emeritus, Villalon is currently a senior lecturer at the University of Texas at Austin. A specialist in late medieval and early modern European history, he has delivered numerous conference papers on such topics as Pedro “the Cruel”, Don Carlos “the unhappy prince of Spain," Spanish involvement in the Hundred Years War and the battle of Najera, Sir Hugh Calveley, the political ideas of Niccolo Machiavelli, English military pardons in the Hundred Years War, and academic editing. His articles have appeared in collections and various academic journals including The Catholic Historical Review, Sixteenth Century Journal, Mediterranean Studies, and the Proceedings of the Ohio Academy of History. Currently, he is working on two book length studies, one on the canonization of San Diego, the other on the life of Sir Hugh Calveley, an English knight and mercenary soldier in the Hundred Years War. Villalon has co-edited with Donald J. Kagay five collections of medieval essays—The Final Argument:  The Imprint of Violence on Society in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (The Boydell Press, 1998); The Circle of War in the Middle Ages:  Essays on Medieval Military and Naval History (The Boydell Press, 1999); Crusaders, Condottieri, and Cannon : Medieval Warfare in Societies around the Mediterranean (Brill, 2002); The Hundred Years War: A Wider Focus (Brill, 2005); and The Hundred Years War: New Vistas (Brill, 2008).  At present, the pair are working on a third volume of their Hundred Years War collection and are collaborating on a joint monograph concerning the battle of Najera (1367). In addition to research in his major field, Villalon has published on automotive history and the history of World War I.  He has held several grants for study in Spain, including a Fulbright; received two awards from the American Association of University Professors for defending academic freedom; and in 2001, was presented the Professional-Scholarly Activity Award for the University College at the University of Cincinnati.  Villalon was the vice president of the Texas Medieval Association (TEMA) in 2007-2008 and president of that organization in 2008-2009.  While serving as president, he organized TEMA’s annual conference which was held that year in Austin.  He is an associate editor of the Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology put out by Oxford in 2009.  (A complete c.v. is available on the website.)

 

This course contains a Writing flag.

HIS 309K • Western Civ In Medieval Times

39235 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1200-100pm WAG 420
(also listed as AHC 310 )
show description

This course will introduce students to the history and culture of the Middle Ages, a period extending from roughly 400-1500 A.D./C.E.  

HIS 350L • Genealogy And History-W

39620 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.216
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 362K • Medieval Warfare

39785 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 2.304
show description

This one semester course will examine the development of warfare between the last Roman Empire and the early modern world (c. 400-1500). It will concentrate on the lands around the Mediterranean including northern and eastern Europe. Students will become acquainted with developments in warfare over the course of more than a millenium through the use of lectures and discussions, readings, photographs, and video. Among other things this course will examine the following topics: the collapse of the Roman military the advent of feudalism the rise of cavalry and its disputed connection to feudalism infantry in medieval warfare the birth of knighthood and chivalry evolving Christian and Muslim views of Just War the Crusades and Crusading orders (such as Knights Templar) the medieval castle and the race between fortifiers and attackers medieval arms and armor the influence of improved missile weapons on medieval warfare the gunpowder revolution of the later Middle Ages.

 

Required Reading/Viewing:

Books:

Charles W. C. Oman, The Art of War in the Middle Ages

Edward M. Peters, The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other

Source Materials

 

In addition to the two books assigned in this course, a number of articles will be posted on the

website.

 

Visual Materials (most or all of the following will be shown in class):

The Roman Legion (DVD)

The Barbarians/Visigoths (DVD)

The Barbarians/Huns (DVD)

The Barbarians/Vikings (DVD)

Modern Marvels: Castle and Dungeons (DVD)

NOVA/Ancient Empires: The Trebuchet (DVD)

The Bayeux Tapestry (CD)

The Crusades (as seen by Terry Jones) (3 of the 4 DVDs in the series)

Knights Templar (DVD)

The Barbarians/Mongols (DVD)

 

Grading

A course paper on some aspect of medieval war ( approximately 10 pages). Along with the paper, each student should submit photocopied source materials used in preparation of his/her paper. 33.3% of final grade

An in-class examination during a regular class period based on the lectures and readings, 33.3% of final grade

A final examination during the regularly scheduled final exam period. 33.3% of final grade

HIS 350L • Genealogy And History-W

40000 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CBA 4.326
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 362G • First World War

40155 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm WAG 214
show description

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 306N • Intro To Hist And Cul Of Spain

38709 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm GAR 1.126
show description

Topics in History

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 350L • Genealogy And History-W

39110 • Spring 2009
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 2.108
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 362G • First World War

39245 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm GAR 1.126
show description

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 362K • Medieval Warfare

39255 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 2.304
show description

This one semester course will examine the development of warfare between the last Roman Empire and the early modern world (c. 400-1500). It will concentrate on the lands around the Mediterranean including northern and eastern Europe. Students will become acquainted with developments in warfare over the course of more than a millenium through the use of lectures and discussions, readings, photographs, and video. Among other things this course will examine the following topics: the collapse of the Roman military the advent of feudalism the rise of cavalry and its disputed connection to feudalism infantry in medieval warfare the birth of knighthood and chivalry evolving Christian and Muslim views of Just War the Crusades and Crusading orders (such as Knights Templar) the medieval castle and the race between fortifiers and attackers medieval arms and armor the influence of improved missile weapons on medieval warfare the gunpowder revolution of the later Middle Ages.

 

Required Reading/Viewing:

Books:

Charles W. C. Oman, The Art of War in the Middle Ages

Edward M. Peters, The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other

Source Materials

 

In addition to the two books assigned in this course, a number of articles will be posted on the

website.

 

Visual Materials (most or all of the following will be shown in class):

The Roman Legion (DVD)

The Barbarians/Visigoths (DVD)

The Barbarians/Huns (DVD)

The Barbarians/Vikings (DVD)

Modern Marvels: Castle and Dungeons (DVD)

NOVA/Ancient Empires: The Trebuchet (DVD)

The Bayeux Tapestry (CD)

The Crusades (as seen by Terry Jones) (3 of the 4 DVDs in the series)

Knights Templar (DVD)

The Barbarians/Mongols (DVD)

 

Grading

A course paper on some aspect of medieval war ( approximately 10 pages). Along with the paper, each student should submit photocopied source materials used in preparation of his/her paper. 33.3% of final grade

An in-class examination during a regular class period based on the lectures and readings, 33.3% of final grade

A final examination during the regularly scheduled final exam period. 33.3% of final grade

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