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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Jonathan C. Brown

Professor Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Jonathan C. Brown

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7218
  • Office: GAR 1.114
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: TTH 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.; TH 2:00-3:00 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Jonathan C. Brown has published four single-authored books: A Socioeconomic History of Argentina, 1776-1860 (1979); Oil and Revolution in Mexico (1993), Latin America: A Social History of the Colonial Period (2nd ed., 2005), and A Brief History of Argentina (2nd ed., 2009). Two of these books have been translated and published in Latin America. His first book on Argentina, published by Cambridge University Press, won the Bolton Prize. Brown also edited a collection of essays on workers and populism in Latin America and co-edited books on the Mexican oil industry and on Argentine social history.

 

Research interests

His current efforts are directed toward completing a book manuscript on how the Cuban Revolution changed inter-American relations in the 1960s.  It amounts to a detailed study of Cuba's export of both its revolution and its counterrevolution, the ‘secret war’ between the Cuban revolutionaries and the U.S. government, and the interplay of guerrilla warfare and military coups in several American republics. Brown has completed research in recently declassified documents of the U.S. security agencies and Cuban military and diplomatic archives.

 

Courses taught

Latin American economic and labor history, the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions, Argentina

HIS 386K • Writing Cold War In Latin Amer

39895 • Fall 2014
Meets T 300pm-600pm GAR 2.124
(also listed as LAS 386 )
show description

The Cuban Revolution of 1959 – and the US hostility to it – introduced a new and relentless phase of Cold War confrontation to the Western Hemisphere.  American military forces seldom engaged the “Communist threat” directly – with the notable exceptions of the 1962 Missile Crisis and the 1965 invasion of the Dominican Republic. Even the CIA’s Bay of Pigs assault of 1961 had been fought by Cuban exiles without any US combat support.

In contrast, this seminar focuses on the lesser-known “secret war” in which both Cuba and the United States utilized surrogates against each other.  Tactics of the secret war included paramilitary incursions, sabotage, hit-and-run attacks, and subversion.  The Cubans trained Latin American leftists in guerrilla warfare and the U.S. taught counterinsurgency tactics to their allies, a process that brought left and right-wing extremists of other nations into the struggle.  In this manner, Cuba’s revolution and its counterrevolution spilled over to other countries of the hemisphere. 

This course seeks to unravel two paradoxes of inter-American relations in the turbulent decade of the 1960s. 1.  Try as it might to defeat the Cuban Revolution, the United States could not have been more accommodating in assuring its longevity.  Everything American policymakers did to combat communism reinforced Fidel Castro’s rule and undermined his domestic enemies.  2.  For their part, the Cuban revolutionaries sought to eliminate the few remaining dictators and extend their revolution to the rest of the hemisphere.  Instead, they provoked the spread of long-term military rule over millions of Latin Americans.  In this course, we will analyze why the revolutionary struggle within Cuba became internationalized. But the story has an additional dimension: we might hypothesize that the secret war made the revolution in Cuba more radical and the counterrevolution abroad more reactionary.

Most of all, students in this seminar will connect the Cuban revolution of 1959 with the military counterrevolutions in South America that dominated the 1960s and 1970s. The one led to the others.  Cuba’s revolutionary example added one element of international tension. The policy of anti-communism projected across the Western Hemisphere by American diplomats and military attachés from 1959 onward provided the other essential linkage. They treated every country as vulnerable to the revolutionary contagion. 

            One's grade is based upon the student’s contributions to seminar discussions (worth 10% of the final grade), a 7-page essay on the Cuban Revolution (worth 20%), a second 7-page essay (30%) on Counterrevolution in Latin America, and an 8-page essay (40%) on an individual research project.

HIS 346T • Cuban Revolution & The Us

39865 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 4.134
(also listed as LAS 366 )
show description

Students in this course will investigate why the Cuban Revolution of 1959 had an impact beyond its shores, essentially transforming both Inter-American and East-West relations.  At the outset, students then will survey the history of Cuban-U.S. relations from the so-called Spanish American War to the Great Depression.  We will then analyze the populist period in Cuba that ended up in the dictatorship of General Fulgencio Batista and how an essentially middle-class rebellion forced him from power on January 1, 1959.  Then we will take a long look at the process by which Fidel Castro consolidated political power, mobilized the popular classes for revolutionary reforms, and turned to an alliance with the Soviet Union.  World War III nearly began over the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.  We pay special attention to the revolution's influence on social organization, gender relations, and education.  The students must also understand the relationship between popular demands, political consolidation, and Cuba's external relations.  Finally, the class will assess how the Cuban Revolution affected U.S.-Latin American relations and why Castro choose to support other revolutions in Latin America and Africa.

Texts:

Sebastian Balfour, Castro

Samuel Farber, The Origins of the Cuban Revolution

Lois M. Smith, Sex and Revolution

Ernesto “Che” Guevara, Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War

Grading:

A map assignment worth 5 % of the final grade or 50 points.

Mid-term exam worth 20 % of the final grade or 200 points.

Written book essay worth 35 % of the final grade or 350 points.

Final exam worth 40 % of the final grade or 400 points.

HIS 363K • Argentina: Populism/Insurrectn

39980 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as LAS 366 )
show description

This class will investigate the principal trends and issues of modern Argentine history, which has been marked by its share of social and political unrest and of economic booms and busts. Designed to provide the student with a broad knowledge of Argentina, the course devotes its attention to the period from independence (c. 1810) through to the present. No doubt, students will discover that, despite sharing many trends with other Latin American nations, Argentina’s history has been unique. The principal question remains: Why has such a talented people as the Argentineans had a turbulent and violent history—including a Dirty War and the “disappearance” of up to 30,000 citizens?

Texts:

Three books on Argentina of the student’s choice

Grading:

Each student will complete a total of five separate assignments: a map assignment, 3 five-page book essays, and a final essay examination. The student's final grade will be based on the total number of points that the student amasses on each of the assignments:

- map assignment 50 points or 5% of the final grade

- 3 written book essays 600 points or 60% of the final grade

- final exam 350 points or 35% of the final grade

HIS 386K • Social History Of Argentina

40150 • Fall 2013
Meets W 200pm-500pm SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 386 )
show description

This course (reading seminar) serves as an introduction to the development of Argentine society from the colonial period to the modern day.  Students will sample the basic literature in Spanish and English that presents the latest trends and debates and suggests additional research for the future. 

 

 One’s final grade in this course will reflect both class participation and the quality of the written essays.  I will make suggestions to students throughout this course concerning both issues, although I place great emphasis on clear and logical writing and expect considerable improvement in the final essay assignment.  Since we concentrate on social history, I suggest that students choose essay topics relating to social relationships between men and women and among individuals representing different groups and classes (i.e., peons and landowners, settlers and indigenous peoples, etc.).

 

Texts:

Brown,  A Brief History of Argentina

Guy, Sex and Danger in Buenos Aires

Moya, Cousins and Strangers

Szuchman and Brown, Revolution and Restoration

Plotkin, Freud on the Pampas

Sabato, The Many and the Few

 

READINGS ON RESERVE AT THE BENSON LATIN AMERICAN COLLECTION

 

Mayo, Estancia y sociedad   

Gelman, Campesinos y estancieros 

De la Fuente, Children of Facundo  

Hora, Landowners of Buenos Aires  

Lewis, Crisis of Argentine Capitalism 

Brown, Workers’ Control   

James, Resistance and Integration 

Lewis, Guerrillas and Generals

HIS 350L • Cold War In Five Continents

39500 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am GAR 0.132
show description

The Cold War involved the whole world.  It began in 1945 when the victorious Allies of World War II broke up into ideological enemy camps that divided the East (the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and China) and the West (Western Europe and the United States).  Whether a country should follow the capitalist West or the socialist East also split many developing nations of Asia, Latin America, and Africa.  Moreover, the proliferation of nuclear weapons complicated the tensions between and within these ideological struggles. 

            While the grim prospects for mutual nuclear annihilation forced the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. to maintain an uneasy peace between them, many armed conflicts did arise at the margins of the great powers.  The Chinese Revolution of 1949 eventually led to serious but limited wars on the Korean Peninsula as well as in Indochina (Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos).  Africa also became involved, as fighters in the “wars of national liberation” engaged with ideological struggle between West and East.  Latin America joined the Cold War struggle when the Cuban Revolution of 1959 sought to eliminate traditional U.S. domination with a military and commercial alliance to the Soviet Union.  In fact, the emergence of socialism in the Western Hemisphere led the East and West to the brink of nuclear warfare.  Students will investigate the Cuban Missile Crisis in the great detail it deserves.

            Needless to say, the Cold War did not treat democracy kindly.  In Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, the emergence of new nations from colonial rule usually resulted in dictatorships rather than electoral governments.  In Latin America, the threat of the spread of Cuban Communism doomed most democracies to long-term military rule culminating in General Pinochet’s coup d’état in Chile on the first 9-11, 11 September 1973.  In the Eastern Bloc countries, communist totalitarianism predominated—not a socialist democracy.  Only the United States and the countries of Western Europe preserved democracy throughout the Cold War period.  Nevertheless, the Cold War did come to a definitive end.  The Soviet Union collapsed, and Eastern European and Latin American dictatorships began to recede by the 1990s.  The world today may be no safer than it was during the Cold War, because the legacy of the “New World Order” resulted neither in order nor in a new world liberated from the burdens of the past.

Proposed texts/readings:

 

Walter LaFeber, America, Russia, and the Cold War, 1945-2006,  10th ed

Chen Jian, Mao’s China & the Cold War

Aleksandr Fursenko and Timothy Naftali, “One Hell of a Gamble:” Khrushchev, Castro, and Kennedy, 1958-1964

 

Basis of grading for the course:

 

            Three essays based on the above texts, 60 percent.

            Two multiple choice exams, 20 percent.

            Participation in class discussions, 20 percent.

HIS 346T • Cuban Revolution & The Us

39345 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 3.122
(also listed as LAS 366 )
show description

THE CUBAN REVOLUTION AND THE UNITED STATES

 

            Students in this course will investigate why the Cuban Revolution of 1959 had an impact beyond its shores, essentially transforming both Inter-American and East-West relations.  At the outset, students then will survey the history of Cuban-U.S. relations from the so-called Spanish American War to the Great Depression.  We will then analyze the populist period in Cuba that ended up in the dictatorship of General Fulgencio Batista and how an essentially middle-class rebellion forced him from power on January 1, 1959.  Then we will take a long look at the process by which Fidel Castro consolidated political power, mobilized the popular classes for revolutionary reforms, and turned to an alliance with the Soviet Union.  World War III nearly began over the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.  We pay special attention to the revolution's influence on social organization, gender relations, and education.  The students must also understand the relationship between popular demands, political consolidation, and Cuba's external relations.  Finally, the class will assess how the Cuban Revolution affected U.S.-Latin American relations and why Castro choose to support other revolutions in Latin America and Africa. 

 

            Student requirements and preparations for the course include reading three paperback books and a packet of three articles, viewing video documentaries, participating in class discussions, and attending lectures.  In addition, each student will turn in a map assignment and a 6-page book essay based on a book selected from the bibliography of our readings.

 

            One's final grade will consist of the following graded exercises:

                        -A map assignment worth 5 % of the final grade or 50 points.

                        -A mid-term exam worth 20 % of the final grade or 200 points.

                        -A written book essay worth 35 % of the final grade or 350 points.

                        -A final exam worth 40 % of the final grade or 400 points.

 

The accumulation of points at the end of the semester will determine the student's final grade: i.e., 900 points or more for an A, 800 or more for a B, and so forth. 

 

REQUIRED TEXTS (all paperback)

            Sebastian Balfour, Castro

            Samuel Farber, The Origins of the Cuban Revolution

            Lois M. Smith, Sex and Revolution

            Ernesto “Che” Guevara, Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War

HIS 386K • The Cuban Revlutn & Latin Amer

39720 • Fall 2012
Meets W 200pm-500pm SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 386 )
show description

The Cuban Revolution of 1959 – and the US hostility to it – introduced a new and relentless phase of Cold War confrontation to the Western Hemisphere.  American military forces seldom engaged the “Communist threat” directly – with the notable exceptions of the 1962 Missile Crisis and the 1965 invasion of the Dominican Republic. Even the CIA’s Bay of Pigs assault of 1961 had been fought by Cuban exiles without any US combat support.

In contrast, this seminar focuses on the lesser-known “secret war” in which both Cuba and the US utilized surrogates against each other.  Tactics of the secret war included paramilitary incursions, sabotage, hit-and-run attacks, and subversion.  The Cubans trained their Latin American allies in guerrilla warfare and the US taught counterinsurgency tactics to theirs, a process that brought left and right-wing extremists of other nations into the struggle.  In this manner, Cuba’s revolution and its counterrevolution spilled over to other countries of the hemisphere.

This course seeks to unravel two paradoxes of inter-American relations in the turbulent decade of the 1960s. 1.  Try as it might to defeat the Cuban Revolution, the United States could not have been more accommodating in assuring its longevity.  Everything American policymakers did to combat communism reinforced Fidel Castro’s rule and undermined his domestic enemies.  2.  For their part, the Cuban revolutionaries sought to eliminate the few remaining dictators and extend their revolution to the rest of the hemisphere.  Instead, they provoked the spread of long-term military rule over millions of Latin Americans.  In this course, we will analyze why the revolutionary struggle within Cuba became internationalized. But the story has an additional dimension: we might hypothesize that the secret war made the revolution in Cuba more radical and the counterrevolution abroad more reactionary.

Most of all, students in this seminar will connect the Cuban revolution of 1959 with the military counterrevolutions in South America that dominated the 1960s and 1970s. The one led to the others.  Cuba’s revolutionary example added one element of international tension. The policy of anti-communism projected all across the hemisphere by American diplomats and military attachés from 1959 onward provided the other essential linkage. They treated every country as vulnerable to the revolutionary contagion.

One's grade is based upon the student’s contributions to seminar discussions, a mid-term essay on the Cuban Revolution, and a final essay on revolution and/or counterrevolution in other countries of Latin America. 

HIS F346R • Revolutn In Modern Lat Amer

85510 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as LAS F366 )
show description

In this course, students will study and compare two social revolutions in twentieth century Latin America:  the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and the Cuban Revolution of 1959.  Each qualifies as a social revolution because it experienced a violent and abrupt transformation of political, economic, and social relationships.  In addition, both the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions have challenged the foreign policy of the United States. 

 

Yet the different outcomes of these revolutions present the student with a paradox that must be explained.  Why did the Mexican Revolution, despite the massive participation of peasants and workers, not result in the same degree of radicalism as did the middle-class revolution in Cuba? 

 

Discussions in this course will focus on the theory of revolution, especially the work of sociologist Theda Skocpol.  The subjects for comparative analysis include:  the reasons for revolt, leaders and participants, post-revolutionary reforms, and the international consequences of Latin American revolutions.

 

         One's grade is based upon a mid-term essay examination on the Mexican Revolution (worth 300 points), two map assignments (50 points each), and a final essay examination on the Cuban Revolution in comparison to the Mexican (600 points).  To earn an A, the student must have accumulated 900 or more points at the end of the session; a B, 800 to 899 points; and so forth.  NO ONE WILL MISS AN EXAMINATION WITHOUT A PHYSICIAN'S EXCUSE.  It is also advisable not to miss a single class.

 

REQUIRED TEXTS: Che Guevara, Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War

                                    Jorge Domínguez, “Cuba Since 1959”                       

Michael Gonzales, The Mexican Revolution

HIS F346T • Cuban Revolution & The Us

85475 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm UTC 4.110
(also listed as LAS F366 )
show description

This course provides a comparative analysis of two social revolutions in twentieth-century Latin America: the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and the Cuban Revolution in 1959.  Both of these revolutions caused a profound transformation of political, economic and social relationships and both challenged the hegemony of the United States.  Yet, the different outcomes of the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions leave us with an important paradox: why did the Mexican Revolution, despite the massive participation of peasants and workers, not result in the same degree of radicalism as did the middle-class revolution in Cuba?

 

The course will focus on such key themes as liberalism, racial and gender relations, populism, religion, communism, revolution and democracy.  Alongside these key themes we will devote a significant portion of the semester examining Mexico and Cuba’s relation with the world – especially the United States – and how this connection shaped the outcome of revolution.   

 

Texts 

Theda Skocpol, “A Structural Analysis of Social Revolutions”

Michael Gonzales, The Mexican Revolution, 1910-1940

Samuel Farber, The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered

 

Grading 

Midterm: 30%

Mexico map assignment: 5%

Cuba map assignment: 5%

Final (comprehensive) exam: 60%

HIS 346T • The Cuban Revolution & The Us

39610 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WEL 2.246
show description

HIS 346T, 39610                                                                                                 Prof. J. Brown          
LAS 366, 40605                                  
T-Th 12:30-2:00                                  
WEL 2.246                           

 

 

Spring 2010

 

THE CUBAN REVOLUTION AND THE UNITED STATES

 

            Students in this course will investigate why the Cuban Revolution of 1959 had an impact beyond its shores, essentially transforming both Inter-American and East-West relations.  At the outset, students then will survey the history of Cuban-U.S. relations from the so-called Spanish American War to the Great Depression.  We will then analyze the populist period in Cuba that ended up in the dictatorship of General Fulgencio Batista and how an essentially middle-class rebellion forced him from power on January 1, 1959.  Then we will take a long look at the process by which Fidel Castro consolidated political power, mobilized the popular classes for revolutionary reforms, and turned to an alliance with the Soviet Union.  We pay special attention to the revolution's influence on social organization, gender relations, and education.  The students must also understand the relationship between popular demands, political consolidation, and Cuba's external relations.  Finally, the class will assess how the Cuban Revolution affected U.S.-Latin American relations and why Castro choose to support other revolutions in Latin America and Africa. 

 

            Student requirements and preparations for the course include reading four paperback books and a packet of three articles, viewing video documentaries, participating in class discussions, and attending lectures.  In addition, each student will turn in a map assignment and a 6-page book essay based on a book selected from the bibliography of our readings.

 

            One's final grade will consist of the following graded exercises:

                        -A map assignment worth 5 % of the final grade or 50 points.

                        -A mid-term exam worth 20 % of the final grade or 200 points.

                        -A written book essay worth 35 % of the final grade or 350 points.

                         -A final exam worth 40 % of the final grade or 400 points.

 

REQUIRED TEXTS (all paperback)

            Sebastian Balfour, Castro

            Samuel Farber, Origins of the Cuban Revolution

            Lois M. Smith, Sex and Revolution

            Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara, Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War

 

Required reading packet, available at Jenn's, 2200 Guadalupe

                        Theda Skocpol, "A Structural Analysis of Social Revolutions"

                        Louis A. Perez, Jr., “Cuba, 1930-1959”

                        Jorge I. Domínguez, “Cuba since 1959”

                        Jonathan Brown, “The Cuban Revolution and the Sino-Soviet Dispute” 

 

 

UGS 303 • Us-Latin American Relations

64135-64160 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 0.102
show description

Undergraduate Studies 303                                    Prof. Jonathan Brown
T-Th 3:30 – 4:45                                                     Off.   GAR 2.104
GAR 0.102                                                   Off  hrs. T2-3:15; Th9:30-12
Discussion  Sections                                               Off ph:  475-7218
Mondays, 3-6 p.m.                                                jcbrown@mail.utexas.edu
MAI 220A & B  

 

Imperialism or Cooperation? 

United States Relations with Latin America

 

      Globalization has become a fact of life for today’s students, and this course will explain how the interpenetration of migration, trade, and investments over time has led to greater integration as well as conflict between the English-speaking people of North America and the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking peoples of Latin America.

This course surveys the history of United States relations and diplomacy in Latin America from the Monroe Doctrine of 1823 to the Neo-liberal Reforms of the 1990s.  The central question of the course will revolve around whether, on balance, the United States has contributed positively to the development of democracy and economic growth in Latin America.

      Students will examine the general outlines of US-Latin American economic relations, including major investments in Latin American economies and the role played by international banks in the Debt Crisis of the early 1980s and in subsequent economic reforms.  Lectures and discussions will also cover the major armed conflicts of inter-American affairs such as the Mexican-American War, the Spanish-American War, the Panama Affair, and the US armed interventions into several revolutions of the 20th century.  Coming at the height of the Cold War, the Cuban Revolution stands out as a major watershed in US relations with its southern neighbors.  Before the Castro Revolution of 1959, only a handful of dictatorships existed in Latin America, mostly in smaller countries of the circum-Caribbean area.  However, within a decade of Cuba’s turning to Communism, a majority of Latin American citizens lived under military dictatorships.  What role, if any, did the US play in the decline democracy?  Or in the return to democracy in the 1980s and 1990s?

One's final grade will consist of the following graded exercises:

      A map assignment worth 50 points or 5 % of the final grade;

      A mid-term examination worth 200 points or 20 % of the final grade;

      A written research paper (3 to 5 pages) worth 330 points or 33 % of the final grade;

      And a final examination worth 400 points or 40 % of the final grade; and

      Two 1-page reports on Latin American talks on campus worth 20 pts.

      The accumulation of points at the end of the semester determines the student's final grade: i.e., 900 points or more for an A, 800 or more for a B, and so forth.  Please understand that NO ONE WILL MISS AN ASSIGNMENT OR EXAMINATION WITHOUT A PHYSICIAN'S EXCUSE.  Unexcused late assignments receive appropriate grade reductions.

No cell phones, internet, texting, etc during class.  WE WILL TAKE ATTENDANCE.

 

THE TEACHING ASSISTANTS: 
Msra. Juandrea Bates                  Mstro. Aragorn Storm Miller
Off hrs: Mondays, 9-noon            Off Hrs.  Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m.
BUR 416                                                BUR 416    
471-3261                                                471-3261
juandreabates.gmail.com            asm667@mail.utexas.edu

REQUIRED TEXTS:
      Peter H. Smith, Talons of the Eagle, 4th ed.
      Robert H. Holden & Eric Zolov, Latin America & the United States: A Documentary History


Class  Schedule

                                Lecture Topics                            Smith textbook                                    Holden-Zolov

Week 1 –January 19      “War w/ Mexico”                   Introduction                                                Nos. 1-15

Week 2--January 25        “Cuba and Panama”               Chapter 1                                                      16-30

                  January 28                  Map Assignments due

January 29, noon to 1:30 p.m.  Conference on Mexican Revolutions, Eastwood Room, Student Union

Week 3—February 1        “Mexican Revolution”           Chapter 2-3                                                   31-45

Week 4—February 8    “Dollar Diplomacy vrs. Good Neighbor”  Chapter 4                                     46-60

Week 5—February 15       “Cold War & Guatemala”                  Chapter 5                                         61-75

Week 6—February 22        “Cuban Revolution”                         Chapter 6                                         76-90

Week 7—March 1            “Export of Revolution”                       Chapter 7                 

March 4-5        Conference on “Violence in Latin America” Santa Rita Room, Texas Union 3.502                                    

Week 8—March 8                “Review for Examination”                                                                                                            March 9                  Mid-term Examination
                  March 11                    Writing the Analytical Essay

Spring Break – March 15

Week 9—  March 22       “Panama/Dom Rep”                         Chapter 8                                           91-105

                  No Discussion Sections March 22

                  No Lecture March 23

                  Return to Lecture March 25                 

Week 10—March 29    “Brazilian Military Revolution”               Chapter 9                                          106-115

Week 11—April 5      “Chile: the First 9/11”                         Chapter 10                                            116-124

Week 12—April 12    “Nicaraguan Revolution”                      Chapter 11                                                     

April 14, 3:30 p.m., “Independence, and Revolution in Mexico,” Sinclair Suite, UNB 3.128

Week 13—April 19                         Research & Writing Week – no seminars or lectures

Week 14—April 26    Research papers are due in Seminars

                  April 29-30, Conference on Racism in Latin America 

Week 15—May 3    “Neo-Liberalism & Its Critics”

Wednesday, May 12, 2:00–5:00 pm             Final Examination  

HIS 386K • Compar Latin Amer Revolutions

40295 • Fall 2009
Meets T 330pm-630pm SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 386 )
show description

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese, and consent of the graduate adviser.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 346R • Revolutn In Modern Latin Amer

84935 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm UTC 4.112
show description

This course provides a comparative analysis of two social revolutions in twentieth-century Latin America: the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and the Cuban Revolution in 1959.  Both of these revolutions caused a profound transformation of political, economic and social relationships and both challenged the hegemony of the United States.  Yet, the different outcomes of the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions leave us with an important paradox: why did the Mexican Revolution, despite the massive participation of peasants and workers, not result in the same degree of radicalism as did the middle-class revolution in Cuba?

 

The course will focus on such key themes as liberalism, racial and gender relations, populism, religion, communism, revolution and democracy.  Alongside these key themes we will devote a significant portion of the semester examining Mexico and Cuba’s relation with the world – especially the United States – and how this connection shaped the outcome of revolution.   

HIS 386L • Compar Latin Amer Revolutions

39430 • Spring 2009
Meets TH 500pm-800pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as LAS 386 )
show description

Research Seminar in Latin American History. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese, and consent of the graduate adviser.

Publications

BOOKS

A Brief History of Argentina.  New York: Checkmark Books, 2004.

Latin America: A Social History of the Colonial Period.  2nd ed.  Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth, 2005.  (Winner of Hamilton Prize.)

Oil and Revolution in Mexico.  Berkeley: The University of California Press, 1993.

A Socioeconomic History of Argentina, 1776-1860.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1979.  (Winner of the Bolton Prize.)

EDITED BOOKS

Workers' Control in Latin America, 1930-1979.  Chapel Hill:  University of North Carolina Press, 1997.  http://uncpress.unc.edu/books/T-221.html

With Mark D. Szuchman:  Revolution and Restoration: The Rearrangement of Power in Argentina, 1760-1860.  Lincoln: The University of Nebraska Press, 1994.

With Alan Knight:  The Mexican Petroleum Industry in the Twentieth Century.  Austin: The University of Texas Press, 1992.

ARTICLES

“Contrarevolución en el Caribe: La CIA y los paramilitares cubanos en los 60,” Temas. Cultura, Ideología, Sociedad. Havana.No. 55 (Sep 2008): 57-72.

Chile, efectos sociales del modelo neoliberal de desarrollo.” In Repertorio político latinoamericano. Ed. by Torcuato Di Tella.  Buenos Aires: Siglo Veinteuno, 2007.

“Los archivos del petróleo y la revolución mexicana.” América Latina en la Historia Económica.  Nueva época, no. 23 (Jan-Feb 2005): 49-60.  [Reprinted in Boletín, Archivo Histórico de Petróleos Mexicanos, No. 5 (Dec 2005): 57-68.

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