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Alan Tully, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

George B. Forgie

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1972, Stanford University

Associate Professor and Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor
George B. Forgie

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7231
  • Office: GAR 3.212
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: F 2:30-4:30 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

He is now studying northern political writing during the Civil War.

Courses taught

His major teaching fields are U.S. political and cultural history from 1763 to 1877 and the U.S. Constitution.

HIS 334L • Amer Rev/Fnd Of Us, 1763-1800

39545 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 330pm-500pm WEL 2.308
show description

The Revolutionary transformation of America between 1763 and 1800.  This course studies the history of the thirteen colonies and the United States during the last third of the eighteenth century, with a concentration on the origins, nature, process, and effects of the American Revolution. Specific topics include: American colonial society in the mid-eighteenth century, the French and Indian War, the collapse of the colonial system in British North America, the War for Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, the launching of the national government, and the beginnings of American party politics

 

BOOKS:  The following paperbacks should be purchased:

Gordon S. Wood, The American Revolution: A History   

Woody Holton, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making

of the American Revolution in Virginia

Pauline Maier, American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence

Joseph J. Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING

Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade. The final examination will count 50% of the course grade. Exams, designed to assess your command of course material and your ability to think critically and write clearly, will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor). Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations. Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given, for any reason.

HIS 345J • Coming Of Civil War, 1829-1861

39575 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

OVERVIEW

This course investigates the political, constitutional, economic, and social causes of disunion and the American Civil War.  It seeks to provide students with an understanding of how the stability of the Union was affected by key developments of the period 1829-1861, including the growth of slavery, the rise of abolitionism, the development of modern political parties, economic modernization, immigration, and territorial expansion.

BOOKS.The following paperbacks should be purchased:

William W. Freehling, Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy 

     in South Carolina, 1816-1836

Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (second edition, edited

     by Blight)

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Eric Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War

 

CLASSES.  Each regular class will consist of a lecture of 50-60 minutes, followed by discussion among those students who wish to stay. You may record the classes if you wish, but (unless authorized by SSD)  no laptop computers or similar devices may be used or open during the lecture.  The use--any use--of phones in class is not permitted.  The consequence for students seen texting is yet to be determined, but it will probably fall just this side of the death penalty.

 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING.  In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive) there will be two midterm exams-- Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade.  The final examination will count 50% of the course grade.  Exams, designed to assess your command of course material and your ability to think critically and write clearly, will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given for any reason.

HIS 345L • Amer Civ War/Reconstr, 1861-77

39850 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

This course investigates the political, military, constitutional, diplomatic, and social aspects the American Civil War and its aftermath.  It seeks to provide students with an understanding of the background and purposes of the war, the strengths and strategies of the combatants, and the reasons why the war took the course that it did.  The destruction of slavery is a central focus of the course.  The last third of the course takes up the history of Reconstruction, concentrating on how the various plans of the victors affected and were affected by the lives and aspirations of the vanquished and the freed slaves. 

Assigned readings (tentative list):

James McPherson and James K. Hogue, Ordeal by Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction  (4th edition)

Allen C. Guelzo, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America

Gary W. Gallagher,  The Confederate War

Michael Shaara, The Killer Angels

Albion Tourgée, A Fool's Errand: A Novel of the South during Reconstruction 

Examinations and grading:

In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive), there will be two midterm exams.  Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade.  The final examination will count 50% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).

HIS 355S • Us Constitutional History

40025 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

Description: A lecture and discussion course dealing with the development of the American constitutional tradition from colonial times to the present.  Particular attention will be paid to the drafting and ratification of the Constitution, the rise of the Supreme Court and the doctrines of judicial review and judicial supremacy, and the expansion of the meaning of liberty in twentieth century applications of the Fourteenth Amendment to civil rights, civil liberties and other modern constitutional issues. The course will always keep a sharp focus on the historical context in which these questions arose. 

Texts/Readings: Most readings will be in primary materials, especially opinions of the U. S. Supreme Court, from Marbury v. Madison to recent decisions. 

Examinations and grading: Two midterm examinations, each worth 25% of the course grade, and a comprehensive final examination worth 50% of the course grade.  Exams will be mainly essay format.

HIS 345L • Amer Civ War/Reconstr, 1861-77

39465 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WAG 101
show description

A lecture and discussion course on the American Civil War and its aftermath, emphasizing the political, military, economic, and diplomatic aspects of the conflict; the goals and strategies of the combatants, during and after the war; and the destruction of slavery and the postwar struggle over the future of the freed slaves and the defeated Confederacy. 

Texts/Readings

About five or six paperback books will be assigned, tentatively including Guelzo, Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation; Gallagher, The Confederate War; Shaara, The Killer Angels; and Tourgée, A Fool's Errand. 

Examinations and Grading

Two midterm exams, counting 25% each; a cumulative final examination worth 50% of the course grade.  Exams will be predominantly essay format. 

Prerequisites

Upper-division standing required. Partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

HIS 355S • Us Constitutional History

39620 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CLA 0.102
show description

A lecture and discussion course dealing with the history of the development of the American constitutional tradition from colonial times to the present.  Particular attention will be paid to the drafting and ratification of the Constitution, the rise of the Supreme Court and the doctrines of judicial review and judicial supremacy, and the expansion of the meaning of liberty in twentieth century applications of the Fourteenth Amendment to civil rights, civil liberties and other modern constitutional issues.  The course will always keep a sharp focus on the historical context in which these questions arose.

Texts/Readings

Most readings will be in primary materials, especially opinions of the U. S. Supreme Court from Marbury v. Madison to recent decisions.

Examinations and Grading

Two midterm examinations, each worth 25% of the course grade, and a final examination worth 50% of the course grade.  Exams will be essay format.

Prerequisites

Upper-division standing required.

Partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history.

HIS 334L • Amer Rev/Fnd Of Us, 1763-1800

39305 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

The Revolutionary transformation of America between 1763 and 1800.  This course studies the history of the thirteen colonies and the United States during the last third of the eighteenth century, with a concentration on the origins, nature, process, and effects of the American Revolution. Specific topics include: American colonial society in the mid-eighteenth century, the French and Indian War, the collapse of the colonial system in British North America, the War for Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, the launching of the national government, and the beginnings of American party politics

 

BOOKS:  The following paperbacks should be purchased:

Gordon S. Wood, The American Revolution: A History   

Woody Holton, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making

of the American Revolution in Virginia

Pauline Maier, American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence

Joseph J. Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING:  In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive) on Friday, December 14, from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m., there will be two midterm exams--on Monday, October 1, and Wednesday, October 31, at the class period. Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade. The final examination will count 50% of the course grade. Exams, designed to assess your command of course material and your ability to think critically and write clearly, will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor). Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations. Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given, for any reason.

HIS 345J • Coming Of Civil War, 1829-1861

39330 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

OVERVIEW

This course investigates the political, constitutional, economic, and social causes of disunion and the American Civil War.  It seeks to provide students with an understanding of how the stability of the Union was affected by key developments of the period 1829-1861, including the growth of slavery, the rise of abolitionism, the development of modern political parties, economic modernization, immigration, and territorial expansion.

BOOKS. The following paperbacks should be purchased:

William W. Freehling, Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy 

     in South Carolina, 1816-1836

Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (second edition, edited

     by Blight)

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Eric Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War

 

CLASSES.  Each regular class will consist of a lecture of 50-60 minutes, followed by discussion among those students who wish to stay. You may record the classes if you wish, but (unless authorized by SSD)  no laptop computers or similar devices may be used or open during the lecture.  The use--any use--of phones in class is not permitted.  The consequence for students seen texting is yet to be determined, but it will probably fall just this side of the death penalty.

 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING.  In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive) on Saturday, December 15, 7:00-10:00 p.m., there will be two midterm exams--on Tuesday, October 2, and Tuesday, November 6, at the class period.  Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade.  The final examination will count 50% of the course grade.  Exams, designed to assess your command of course material and your ability to think critically and write clearly, will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given for any reason.

HIS 334L • Amer Rev/Fnd Of Us, 1763-1800

39290 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

OVERVIEW. This course studies the history of the thirteen colonies and the United States during the last third of the eighteenth century, with a concentration on the origins, nature, process, and effects of the American Revolution.  Specific topics include: American colonial society in the mid-eighteenth century, the French and Indian war, the collapse of the colonial system in British North America, the War for Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, the launching of the national government, and the beginnings of American party politics.

BOOKS. [Note: this is list is subject to change in 2011.] The following paperbacks should be purchased:

Gordon S. Wood, The American Revolution: A History   

Woody Holton, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia

Pauline Maier, American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence

Joseph J. Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation

CLASSES.  Each class will consist of a lecture of 50-60 minutes, followed by discussion among those students who wish to stay.  You may record the classes if you wish, but no laptop computers may be used or open during the lecture. The use of phones, including texting, in class is not permitted.

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING:  In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive) there will be two midterm exams.  Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade.  The final examination will count 50% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given, for any reason.

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

HIS 345J • Coming Of Civil War, 1829-1861

39310 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

OVERVIEW.  This course investigates the political, constitutional, economic, and social causes of disunion and the American Civil War.  It seeks to provide students with an understanding of how the stability of the Union was affected by key developments of the period 1829-1861, including the growth of slavery, the rise of abolitionism, the development of modern political parties, economic modernization, immigration, and territorial expansion.

BOOKS. [Note: this is list is subject to change in 2011.]  The following paperbacks should be purchased:

James M. McPherson, Ordeal By Fire.  Volume I:  The Coming of War

William W. Freehling, Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, 1816-1836

Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (second edition, edited by Blight)

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin

Eric Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War

 

CLASSES.  Each class will consist of a lecture of 50-60 minutes, followed by discussion among those students who wish to stay.  You may record the classes if you wish, but no laptop computers may be used or open during the lecture portion of the class.  The use of phones, including texting, in class is not permitted.

 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING.  In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive) there will be two midterm exams.  Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade.  The final examination will count 50% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor) and lectures.  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given for any reason.

 

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

HIS 334L • Amer Rev/Fnd Of Us, 1763-1800

39190 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

History 334L
The
American Revolution and Founding of  the United States, 1763-1800

Fall 2010                                                                                   George Forgie
Unique #39190                                                              forgie@mail.utexas.edu
M & W 3:30-5:00                                                     Garrison 3.212 (475-7231)
JGB 2.218                                                                      M & TH 11:30-1:00

OVERVIEW. This course studies the history of the thirteen colonies and the United States during the last third of the eighteenth century, with a concentration on the origins, nature, process, and effects of the American Revolution.  Specific topics include: American colonial society in the mid-eighteenth century, the French and Indian war, the collapse of the colonial system in British North America, the War for Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, the launching of the national government, and the beginnings of American party politics.

BOOKS. The following paperbacks should be purchased:
Gordon S. Wood, The American Revolution: A History  
Woody Holton, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia
Pauline Maier, American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence
Joseph J. Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation

CLASSES.  Each class will consist of a lecture of 50-60 minutes, followed by discussion among those students who wish to stay.  You may record the classes if you wish, but no laptop computers may be used or open during the lecture. The use of phones, including texting, in class is not permitted.

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES.

Wednesday, August 25
Introduction

Monday, August 30
The Rivalry of Empires

Wednesday, September 1
The Relevance of the "Seven Years' War" (1756-1763)

Monday, September  6
Labor Day

Wednesday, September 8
The Road to the Stamp Tax of 1765

Monday, September 13
The Stamp Act Crisis (1765-66)

Wednesday, September 15
Second Crisis: The Townshend Duties and Their Effects, 1767-1770

Monday, September 20
Tranquility and Then Renewed Crisis, 1770-1774

Wednesday, September 22
The Showdown at Lexington and Concord

Monday, September 27
First Examination

Wednesday, September 29
The Improvised War: 1775

Monday, October 4
A New Goal: Independence

Wednesday, October 6
The Campaign of 1776

Monday, October 11
1777 Changes Everything

Wednesday, October 13
The Articles of Confederation

Monday, October 18
Challenges to Washington’s Leadership

Wednesday, October 20
The Twisting Road to Yorktown

Monday, October 25
The Treaty of Paris

Wednesday, October 27
Second Examination

Monday, November 1
The Trials of Peace

Wednesday, November 3
The Constitutional Convention  (I)

Monday, November 8
The Constitutional Convention (II)

Wednesday, November 10
The Constitutional Convention (III)

Monday, November 15
The Constitutional Convention (Concluded)

Wednesday, November 17
Ratification?

Monday, November 22
The New Government Begins

Wednesday, November 24
TBA

Monday, November 29
The Development of Political Parties

Wednesday, December 1
Was the American Revolution a Revolution?  

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING:  In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive) on Friday, December 10, from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m., there will be two midterm exams--on Monday, September 27, and Wednesday, October 27, at the class period.  Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade.  The final examination will count 50% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given, for any reason.

COURSE Grading Scale:
93-100%            A  
90-92%            A-  
87-89%            B+
83-86%            B  
80-82%           B-  
77-79%            C+  
73-76%            C  
70-72%            C-  
67-69%            D+ 
63-66%         D
60-62%         D-
Below 60%     F  

READING ASSIGNMENTS:
Assignment for the first exam, Monday, September 27:
(1) Gordon S. Wood, The American Revolution: A History, to page 52.
(2) Woody Holton, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia (all)

Assignment for the second exam, Wednesday, October 27:
(1) Gordon S. Wood, The American Revolution: A History, pp. 52-109
(2) Pauline Maier, American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence (all)

 

Assignment for the final exam, Friday,  December 10:
(1) ALL OF THE ABOVE, plus
(2)  Gordon S. Wood, The American Revolution: A History, pp. 113-166.
(3) Joseph J. Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation (all)

Teaching Assistant:
Kyle Shelton kylekshelton@gmail.com
Office Hours: Mondays 12:00-3:00 p.m., at the Cactus Café

Services for Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd

This course contains a Cultural Diversity flag.

HIS 345J • Coming Of Civil War, 1829-1861

39230 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

History 345J: The Coming of the American Civil War, 1829-1861

Fall 2010                                                                                                          George  Forgie
Unique #39230                                                                                  forgie@mail.utexas.edu
T & TH 3:30-5:00                                                                                                Garrison 3.212
JGB 2.218                                                                                            M & TH 11:30-1:00

OVERVIEW.  This course investigates the political, constitutional, economic, and social causes of disunion and the American Civil War.  It seeks to provide students with an understanding of how the stability of the Union was affected by key developments of the period 1829-1861, including the growth of slavery, the rise of abolitionism, the development of modern political parties, economic modernization, immigration, and territorial expansion.

BOOKS. The following paperbacks should be purchased:
James M. McPherson, Ordeal By Fire.  Volume I:  The Coming of War
William W. Freehling, Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, 1816-1836
Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (second edition, edited by Blight)
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Eric Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War

CLASSES.  Each class will consist of a lecture of 50-60 minutes, followed by discussion among those students who wish to stay.  You may record the classes if you wish, but no laptop computers may be used or open during the lecture portion of the class.  The use of phones, including texting, in class is not permitted.

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES.
Thursday,  August 26
Introduction

Tuesday,  August 31
What Historians Have Said about the Causes of Disunion and Civil War

Thursday, September 2
Secession as a Constitutional Question

Tuesday, September 7
Slavery in the United States to 1820; the Missouri Compromise

Thursday,  September 9
Political Parties in the United States to 1828

Tuesday, September 14
The Jacksonian Democrats in Power (I)

Thursday, September 16
The Jacksonian Democrats in Power (II)

Tuesday, September 21
The Rise of the Abolition Movement

Thursday, September 23
The Economic Depression of the 1830s; the Election of 1840

Tuesday, September 28
FIRST MIDTERM EXAM

Thursday, September 30
The Annexation of Texas

Tuesday, October 5
Manifest Destiny: the Expansion of the United States in the 1840s

Thursday, October 7
The Mexican War

Tuesday, October 12
The Problem of Slavery in the Territories

Thursday, October 14
The Westward Movement

Tuesday, October 19
The Crisis and Compromise of 1850

Thursday, October 21
The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854

Tuesday, October 26
Bleeding Kansas

Thursday, October 28
The Tension Between Freedom and Order in the 1840s and 1850s

Tuesday, November 2
SECOND MIDTERM EXAM

Thursday, November 4
Nativism and Party Re-alignment in the 1850s

Tuesday, November 9
The Dred Scott Case

Thursday, November 11
The Lecompton Constitution

Tuesday, November 16
The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Thursday, November 18
John Brown’s Raid; the Election of 1860

Tuesday, November 23
Secession

Thursday, November 25
Thanksgiving

Tuesday, November 30
The Beginning of the American Civil War

Thursday, December 2
TBA

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING.  In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive) on Saturday, December 11, from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m., there will be two midterm exams--on Tuesday, September 28, and Tuesday, November 2, at the class period.  Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade.  The final examination will count 50% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor) and lectures.  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given for any reason.

READING ASSIGNMENTS
Assignment for the first exam, Tuesday, September 28:
(1) McPherson, Ordeal By Fire, pp. 1-58
(2) Freehling, Prelude to Civil War  (all)

Assignment for the second exam, Tuesday, November 2:
(1) McPherson, Ordeal By Fire, pp. 59-99
(2) Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (all)
(3) Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin Soul (all)

Assignment for the final examination, Saturday, December 11:
(1) ALL OF THE ABOVE, plus:
(2) McPherson, Ordeal By Fire, pp. 99-158
(3)  Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men (all)

COURSE Grading Scale
93-100%               A  
90-92%               A-  
87-89%               B+  
83-86%               B  
80-82%              B-  
77-79%               C+  
73-76%               C  
70-72%               C-  
67-69%               D+ 
63-66%            D
60-62%            D-
Below 60%     F  

Teaching Assistant
Kyle Shelton kylekshelton@gmail.com
Office Hours: Mondays 12:00-3:00 p.m., at the Cactus Café

Services for Students with Disabilities
Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd

UGS 345L • Amer Civ War/Reconstr, 1861-77

39585 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
show description

History 345L:  The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1877

Spring 2010                                                                                                         George Forgie

Unique #39585                                                                                forgie@mail.utexas.edu

M & W 3:30-5:00                                                                             Garrison 3.212 (475-7231)

JGB 2.218                                                                                        T 4:00-5:30, TH 3:00-4:30

OVERVIEW.  This course investigates the political, military, constitutional, diplomatic, and social aspects the American Civil War and its aftermath.  It seeks to provide students with an understanding of the background and purposes of the war, the strengths and strategies of the combatants, and the reasons why the war took the course that it did.  The destruction of slavery is a central focus of the course.  The last third of the course takes up the history of Reconstruction, concentrating on how the various plans of the victors affected and were affected by the lives and aspirations of the vanquished and the freed slaves.

BOOKS:  The following paperbacks should be purchased:

James McPherson and James K. Hogue, Ordeal by Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction  (4th edition)

Allen C. Guelzo, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America

Gary W. Gallagher,  The Confederate War

Michael Shaara, The Killer Angels

Albion Tourgée, A Fool's Errand: A Novel of the South during Reconstruction

CLASSES:  Each class will consist of a lecture of 50-60 minutes, followed by discussion among those students who wish to stay.  You may record the classes if you wish, but no laptop computers may be used or open during the lecture.

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES:

Wednesday, January 20

Introduction

Monday, January 25

The Background of Disunion and War

Wednesday, January 27

The Outbreak of War

Monday, February 1

Outlooks and Strategies

Wednesday, February 3

First Engagements

Monday, February 8

Early 1862 (I)

Wednesday, February 10

Early 1862 (II)

Monday, February 15

The Peninsula Campaign

Wednesday, February 17

The Antietam Campaign

Monday, February 22

Emancipation (I)

Wednesday, February 24

Emancipation (II)

Monday, March 1

First Midterm Examination

Wednesday, March 3

Chancellorsville and Gettysburg

Monday, March 8

The Vicksburg Campaign

Wednesday, March 10

Late 1863: Lincoln at Gettysburg

Monday, March 22

Military Campaigns of 1864

Wednesday, March 24

The U.S. Election of 1864

Monday, March 29

The crumbling Confederacy

Wednesday, March 31

End of the Civil War

Monday, April 5

Why the North Won, Why the South Lost

Wednesday, April 7

Second Midterm Examination

Monday, April 12

Reconstruction: Introduction

Wednesday, April 14

Reconstruction, 1864-1865

Monday, April 19

1866: The Fourteenth Amendment

Wednesday, April 21

Reconstruction in 1867-1868: Impeachment

Monday, April 26

Land for the Freed People?

Wednesday, April 28

Reconstruction Politics in the South

Monday, May 3

Redemption to 1874

Wednesday, May 5

The End of Reconstruction 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING:  In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive) on  Friday, May 14, from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m., there will be two midterm exams--on Monday, March 2, and Wednesday, April 8, at the class period.  Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade.  The final examination will count 50% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given, for any reason.

COURSE Grading Scale:

93-100%               A   

90-92%               A-   

87-89%               B+   

83-86%               B   

80-82%              B-   

77-79%               C+   

73-76%               C   

70-72%               C-   

67-69%               D+  

63-66%            D

60-62%            D-

Below 60%     F  

READING ASSIGNMENTS:

Assignment for the first exam, Monday, March 1:

(1) McPherson and Hogue, Ordeal by Fire, pp. 139-334, A1-A16

(2) Guelzo, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation (all)

Assignment for the second exam, Wednesday, April 7:

(1) McPherson and Hogue, Ordeal by Fire, pp. 334-526, A16-A20

(2) Gallagher, Confederate War (all)

(3) Shaara, Killer Angels (all)

Assignment for the final exam, Friday, May 14:

(1) ALL OF THE ABOVE, plus

(2) McPherson and Hogue, Ordeal by Fire, pp. 533-671, A20-A21

(3) Tourgée, Fool's Errand (all)

Teaching Assistant:

John Vurpillat

john.vurpillat@mail.utexas.edu

Office Hours: Monday and Wednesday 2:30-3:30, outside JGB 2.218

Services for Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities should arrange for appropriate

accommodations with the office of Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259

HIS 345J • Coming Of Civil War, 1829-1861

39955 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 400pm-530pm WAG 101
show description

History 345J: The Coming of the American Civil War, 1829-1861
Unique #39955
M & W 4:00-5:15
WAG 101

George  Forgie
forgie@mail.utexas.edu
Garrison 3.212
T 4:00-5:30; TH 3:00-4:30

OVERVIEW.  This course investigates the political, constitutional, economic, and social causes of disunion and the American Civil War. It seeks to provide students with an understanding of how the stability of the Union was affected by key developments of the period 1829-1861, including the growth of slavery, the rise of abolitionism, the development of modern political parties, economic modernization, immigration, and territorial expansion.

BOOKS:  The following paperbacks should be purchased:
James M. McPherson, Ordeal By Fire.  Volume I:  The Coming of War (third edition)
William W. Freehling, Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, 1816-1836
Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (second edition, edited by Blight)
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin
Eric Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War

CLASSES:  Each class will consist of a lecture of 50-60 minutes, followed by discussion among those students who wish to stay.  You may record the classes if you wish, but no laptop computers may be used or open during the lecture portion of the class.

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES:
Wednesday,  August 26
Introduction

Monday,  August 31
What Historians Have Said about the Causes of Disunion and Civil War

Wednesday, September 2
Secession as a Constitutional Question

Monday, September 7
Labor Day

Wednesday,  September 9
Slavery in the United States to 1820; the Missouri Compromise

Monday, September 14
Political Parties in the United States to 1828

Wednesday, September 16
The Jacksonian Democrats in Power (I)

Monday, September 21
The Jacksonian Democrats in Power (II)

Wednesday, September 23
The Rise of the Abolition Movement

Monday, September 28
The Economic Depression of the 1830s; the Election of 1840

Wednesday, September 30
FIRST MIDTERM EXAM

Monday, October 5
The Annexation of Texas

Wednesday, October 7
Manifest Destiny: the Expansion of the United States in the 1840s

Monday, October 12
The Mexican War

Wednesday, October 14
The Problem of Slavery in the Territories

Monday, October 19
The Westward Movement

Wednesday, October 21
The Crisis and Compromise of 1850

Monday, October 26
The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854

Wednesday, October 28
Bleeding Kansas

Monday, November 2
The Tension Between Freedom and Order in the 1840s and 1850s

Wednesday, November 4
SECOND MIDTERM EXAM

Monday, November 9
Nativism and Party Re-alignment in the 1850s

Wednesday, November 11
The Dred Scott Case

Monday, November 16
The Lecompton Constitution

Wednesday, November 18
The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Monday, November 23
John Brown's Raid; the Election of 1860

Wednesday, November 25
To be announced

Monday, November 30
Secession

Wednesday, December 2
The Beginning of the American Civil War

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING:
  In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive) on Friday, December 11 , from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m., there will be two midterm exams--on Wednesday, September
30, and Wednesday, November 4, at the class period.  Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade.  The final examination will count 50% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor) and lectures.  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at all of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given for any reason.

COURSE GRADING SCALE:

93-100%      A
90-92%        A-
87-89%        B+
83-86%        B
80-82%        B-
77-79%        C+
73-76%        C
70-72%        C-
67-69%        D+
63-66%        D
60-62%        D-
Below 60%    F


READING ASSIGNMENTS:

Assignment for the first exam, Wednesday, September 30:
(1) McPherson, Ordeal By Fire, pp. 1-58
(2) Freehling, Prelude to Civil War  (all)

Assignment for the second exam, Wednesday, November 4:
(1) McPherson, Ordeal By Fire, pp. 59-99
(2) Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (all)
(3) Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin (all)

Assignment for the final examination, Friday, December 11:
(1) ALL OF THE ABOVE, plus:
(2) McPherson, Ordeal By Fire, pp. 99-158
(3)  Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men (all)

TEACHING ASSISTANT:

John Vurpillat
john.vurpillat@mail.utexas.edu
Office Hours: Monday and Wednesday 3:00-4:00, outside WAG 101

SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:
Students with disabilities should arrange for appropriate accommodations with the office of Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259

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