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Alan Tully, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Bruce J. Hunt

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1984, Johns Hopkins University

Bruce J. Hunt

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-6109
  • Office: GAR 2.106
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: M 12:30-2:30 p.m.; W 1-2 p.m. & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

His current work focuses on the relationship between technology and science in the 19th century, and particularly on the interaction between theory and practice in the Victorian telegraph industry. He also has strong interests in the history of nuclear weapons and of evolutionary theory.

Courses taught

His teaching interests include the history of modern science, the history of technology, and modern British history.


 

Interests

History of science and technology

HIS 322D • Scientif Revolutn Of 17th Cen

39505 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 0.102
show description

The Scientific Revolution of the 17th century produced a series of fundamental shifts in the way people have viewed the natural world and their own place in it.  In this course we will examine the roots and course of this revolution and trace the main outlines of the new world it helped to create.

 

Texts:

Galileo Galilei, The Essential Galileo (ed. Maurice Finocchiaro),

Peter Dear, Revolutionizing the Sciences (2nd edition, 2009),

James Gleick, Isaac Newton,

John Henry, Knowledge is Power,

Michael R. Matthews (ed.), The Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy

Grading:

Course grades will be +/- and will be based on three one-hour essay exams and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25% each).

HIS 322D • Scientif Revolutn Of 17th Cen

39780 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 0.102
show description

The Scientific Revolution of the 17th century produced a series of fundamental shifts in the way people have viewed the natural world and their own place in it.  In this course we will examine the roots and course of this revolution and trace the main outlines of the new world it helped to create.

Course grades will be +/- and will be based on three one-hour essay exams and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25% each).

Readings (tentative list):

Galileo Galilei, The Essential Galileo (ed. Maurice Finocchiaro),

Peter Dear, Revolutionizing the Sciences (2nd edition, 2009),

James Gleick, Isaac Newton,

John Henry, Knowledge is Power,

Michael R. Matthews (ed.), The Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy



HIS 329P • History Of The Atomic Bomb

39790 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GAR 1.126
show description

This course will focus on the development of nuclear weapons from the discovery of fission in 1938 to the Oppenheimer security hearings of 1954, with a brief look at later events. We will examine the scientific background behind the development of the first atomic bombs, the organization of the Manhattan Project, the American decision to use atomic bombs against Japanese cities, and the post-war debates over arms control and the development of the H-bomb.

This course carries both a writing flag and an ethics and leadership flag.

Course grades will be +/- and will be based will be based on a quiz (10%), a 12-14 page paper (50%), a 4 page paper (15%), an essay exam (15%), and class participation (10%).

Readings (tentative list):

Richard Rhodes, The Making of the Atomic Bomb,

Michael Stoff, et al., eds., The Manhattan Project,

John Hersey, Hiroshima,

Michael J. Hogan, ed., Hiroshima in History and Memory,

Herbert York, The Advisors: Oppenheimer, Teller, and the Superbomb,

Richard Polenberg, ed., In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer,

plus a course packet.

HIS 322M • History Of Modern Science

39720 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 0.102
show description

In this course, we will survey the development of modern science from the time of Isaac Newton to the present, and will examine the growth of scientific ideas and institutions and their changing place in Western society.

 

Texts:

Thomas L. Hankins, Science and the Enlightenment,

Charles Darwin, Evolutionary Writings (ed. James Secord),

Bruce J. Hunt, Pursuing Power and Light: Technology and Physics from James Watt to Albert Einstein,

James D. Watson, The Double Helix (Norton Critical Ed., ed. G. S. Stent),

plus a packet of xeroxed readings.

 Grading:

Grades will be based on three essay exams (25% each) and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25%).

HIS 350L • Electrification

39815 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CAL 200
show description

In this seminar, we will examine how electrical technologies have affected the world economy and the lives of ordinary people over the past century and a half.  We will look at the growth both of the electrical power systems on which we have all come to rely and of the telecommunications networks (telegraph, telephone, radio, TV, and the Internet) that now connect us together.  We will give particular attention to the electrical history of the Austin area, which provides particularly revealing instances of many of the developments we will be discussing.

 

Texts:

David Nye, Electrifying America,

plus a course packet.

Grading:

This course carries a Writing Flag.  Grades will be based on a class presentation (10%), a 4-5 page paper on a topic related to the presentation (15%), a 16-20 page research paper (45%), a short written critique of another student's draft paper (10%), and class participation (20%).

HIS 322M • History Of Modern Science

39430 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 0.102
show description

In this course, we will survey the development of modern science from the time of Isaac Newton to the present, and will examine the growth of scientific ideas and institutions and their changing place in Western society. Grades will be based on three essay exams (25% each) and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25%).

HIS 380K • Hist Of Science-Themes & Probs

39765 • Spring 2013
Meets M 100pm-400pm GAR 1.122
show description

This reading seminar is designed to introduce graduate students from a variety of backgrounds to the literature of the history of science and to the main schools of thought within the field. Toward that end, we will read and discuss a wide range of books and articles—some already “classic,” others perhaps on their way to becoming so—that shed light on some of the main themes and problems in the history of science and technology. In particular, we will examine the differing ways historians have addressed such issues as the shifting intellectual authority of science; the role social and cultural factors have played in shaping scientific knowledge; the relationship between scientific knowledge and technological practices; and the place science and technology have come to play in global and imperial contexts. 

 

Requirements:

Each student will be required to write a brief (2 page) response to each week’s readings, due before class, and to deliver at least one class presentation. Everyone will also be expected to take an active part in class discussions. Each student will also be required to write a 15–18 page historiographical essay on an appropriate topic of his or her choice, to be due toward the end of the semester.

 

Grading:

Grades will be based on the response essays (20%), the class presentations (10%), the historiographical essays (40%), and class participation (30%).

 

HIS 322D • Scientif Revolutn Of 17th Cen

39265 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 0.102
show description

The Scientific Revolution of the 17th century produced a series of fundamental shifts in the way people have viewed the natural world and their own place in it. In this course we will examine the roots and course of this revolution and trace the main outlines of the new world it helped to create.

 

Texts:

Galileo Galilei, The Essential Galileo (ed. Maurice Finocchiaro),

Peter Dear, Revolutionizing the Sciences (2nd edition, 2009),

James Gleick, Isaac Newton,

John Henry, Knowledge is Power,

Michael R. Matthews (ed.), The Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy.

 

Grades:

Grades will be based on three essay exams (25% each) and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25%).

 

HIS 350L • The Galileo Affair

39395 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as R S 357 )
show description

Description:

This course will focus on the life and work of Galileo Galilei (1564–1642), particularly his conflict with Church authorities and his condemnation in 1633. We will also put Galileo’s work in several broader contexts: the development of science in the 16th and 17th centuries; court life and patronage in early modern Italy; and the history of relations between science and religion.

This is a Writing Flag course. We will emphasize research, writing, and class discussion.

 

Texts:

Richard Blackwell, Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible,

Maurice Finocchiaro (ed.), The Galileo Affair: A Documentary History,

Maurice Finocchiaro (ed.), The Essential Galileo,

Dava Sobel, Galileo’s Daughter,

plus a packet of readings.

 

Grades:

Each student will co-lead a class discussion during the semester, and will write:

— a short paper (3–4 pages) on a related topic;

— a longer research paper (16–20 pages), a draft version of which the student will circulate to the class for discussion;

— a formal critique (2–3 pages) of another student’s draft paper.

Grades will be based on the class presentation (10%), the short paper (10%),  the presentation of the draft of the longer paper (10%), the final version of the longer paper (45%), the critique (10%), and participa­tion in class discussions (15%).

HIS 322M • History Of Modern Science

39275 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 0.102
show description

In this course, we will survey the development of modern science from the time of Isaac Newton to the present, and will examine the growth of scientific ideas and institutions and their changing place in Western society.

Texts 

Thomas L. Hankins, Science and the Enlightenment,

Charles Darwin, Evolutionary Writings (ed. James Secord),

Bruce J. Hunt, Pursuing Power and Light: Technology and Physics from James Watt to Albert Einstein,

James D. Watson, The Double Helix (Norton Critical Ed., ed. G. S. Stent),

plus a packet of xeroxed readings.

 

Grades will be based on three essay exams (25% each) and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25%). 

HIS 329P • History Of The Atomic Bomb

39280 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 2.112
show description

This course will focus on the development of nuclear weapons from the discovery of fission in 1938 to the Oppenheimer security hearings of 1954, with a brief look at later events. We will examine the scientific background behind the development of atomic bombs, the organization of the Manhattan Project, the decision to use atomic bombs against Japanese cities, and the post-war debates over arms control and the development of the H-bomb.

This course carries a writing flag.

 

Course grades will be +/- and will be based will be based on two quizzes (5% each), a 12-14 page paper (50%), a 4 page paper (15%), an essay exam (15%), and class participation (10%).

HIS 322D • Scientif Revolutn Of 17th Cen

39255 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 0.102
show description

The Scientific Revolution of the 17th century produced a series of fundamental shifts in the way people have viewed the natural world and their own place in it.  In this course we will examine the roots and course of this revolution and trace the main outlines of the new world it helped to create.

Course grades will be +/- and will be based on three essay exams (25% each) and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25%). There will be no separate final exam.

Books (tentative list):

Galileo Galilei, The Essential Galileo (ed. Maurice Finocchiaro)

Peter Dear, Revolutionizing the Sciences (2nd edition, 2009)

James Gleick, Isaac Newton

 John Henry, Knowledge is Power

 Michael R. Matthews (ed.), The Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy

 

HIS 350L • Electrification

39340 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 200pm-330pm GAR 1.134
show description

In this seminar, we will examine how electrical technologies have affected the world economy and the lives of ordinary people over the past century and a half.  We will look at the growth both of the electrical power systems on which we have all come to rely and of the telecommunications networks (telegraph, telephone, radio, TV, and the Internet) that now connect us together.  We will give particular attention to the electrical history of the Austin area, which provides particularly revealing instances of many of the developments we will be discussing.

 

Texts

David Nye, Electrifying America,

plus a course packet.

 

Grading

This course carries a Writing Flag.  Grades will be based on a class presentation (10%), a 4-5 page paper on a topic related to the presentation (15%), a 16-20 page research paper (45%), a short written critique of another student's draft paper (10%), and class participation (20%).

HIS 322D • Scientif Revolutn Of 17th Cen

39530 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WEL 2.246
show description

The Scientific Revolution of the 17th century produced a series of fundamental shifts in the way people have viewed the natural world and their own place in it.  In this course we will examine the roots and course of this revolution and trace the main outlines of the new world it helped to create.

Course grades will be +/- and will be based on three one-hour essay exams and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25% each).

Readings (tentative list):

Galileo Galilei, The Essential Galileo (ed. Maurice Finocchiaro),

Peter Dear, Revolutionizing the Sciences (2nd edition, 2009),

James Gleick, Isaac Newton,

John Henry, Knowledge is Power,

Michael R. Matthews (ed.), The Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy



HIS 329P • History Of The Atomic Bomb

39540 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 2.112
show description

This course will focus on the development of nuclear weapons from the discovery of fission in 1938 to the Oppenheimer security hearings of 1954, with a brief look at later events. We will examine the scientific background behind the development of the first atomic bombs, the organization of the Manhattan Project, the American decision to use atomic bombs against Japanese cities, and the post-war debates over arms control and the development of the H-bomb.

This course carries both a writing flag and an ethics and leadership flag.

Course grades will be +/- and will be based will be based on a quiz (10%), a 12-14 page paper (50%), a 4 page paper (15%), an essay exam (15%), and class participation (10%).

Readings (tentative list):

Richard Rhodes, The Making of the Atomic Bomb,

Michael Stoff, et al., eds., The Manhattan Project,

John Hersey, Hiroshima,

Michael J. Hogan, ed., Hiroshima in History and Memory,

Herbert York, The Advisors: Oppenheimer, Teller, and the Superbomb,

Richard Polenberg, ed., In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer,

plus a course packet.

HIS 322M • History Of Modern Science

39155 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am FAC 21
show description

History of Modern Science                                                               Prof. Bruce J. Hunt
HIS 322M — 39155                                                                       Office: GAR 2.106   232–6109
Fall 2010                        FAC 21                                                    MW 11–12, W 2–3, and by appt.
MWF 10–11                                                                                   bjhunt@mail.utexas.edu                                                                                                                           TAs: Angela Smith and Felipe Cruz

 

In this course, we will survey the development of modern science from the time of Isaac Newton to the present.  We will examine the growth of scientific ideas and institutions, and will seek to understand their changing place in Western life and thought.

Readings:

Thomas L. Hankins, Science and the Enlightenment,
Charles Darwin, Evolutionary Writings (ed. James A. Secord)
Bruce J. Hunt, Pursuing Power and Light,
James D. Watson, The Double Helix (Norton Critical Edition, ed. Gunther S. Stent); additional materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Course grades will be +/­– and will be based on three essay exams (25% each) and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25%).  There will be no separate final.  In place of the second exam, you may write a 6–8 page research paper, due on Oct. 29.  If you choose to write such a paper, you must meet with me and get an appropriate topic approved by Oct. 13.  We will not take attendance, but you will need to pay close attention to all of the lectures to do well in the course.

Aug  25            Overview: Science and its history.
Aug. 27            From the Aristotelian to the Newtonian world.

Aug. 30            The Principia and the Newtonian synthesis.
Sept.  1            Newtonian experimentalism: light and color.
Sept.  3            Thomas Kuhn and the structure of scientific revolutions.

Sept.  8            The Enlightenment and the spirit of analysis.
Sept. 10            Chemistry: from phlogiston to oxygen.

Sept. 13            Natural history: Linnaeus and taxonomy.
Sept. 15            The Encyclopédie and the Age of Reason.
Sept. 17            Science under Napoleon: the Laplacians.

Sept. 20            The wave theory of light.
Sept. 22            Review: the development of the sciences to 1820.
Sept. 24            First exam (25%).

Sept. 27            The organization of science in the 19th century.
Sept. 29            Romanticism and the sciences: Goethe, Oersted, Humboldt.
Oct.  1            Geology in the early 19th century.

Oct.  4            The “species question” before Darwin.
Oct.  6            Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle.
Oct.  8            Evolution by natural selection.

Oct. 11            Darwin, Wallace, and The Origin of Species.
Oct. 13            Short paper due (25%); discussion.
Oct. 15            Scientific and popular responses to Darwinism.

Oct. 18            Social Darwinism and eugenics.
Oct. 20            The “eclipse of Darwinism” around 1900.
Oct. 22            Mendel and genetics.

Oct. 25            The neo-Darwinian synthesis.
Oct. 27    Review: the evolution of Darwinism.
Oct. 29            Second exam (25%).

Nov. 1            Steam engines and the conservation of energy.
Nov. 3            The mechanical program and the kinetic theory of gases.
Nov. 5            — no class —

Nov. 8            Faraday, Maxwell, and the electromagnetic field.
Nov. 10            Technology and science: electrification.
Nov. 12            The new physics: X-rays and radioactivity.

Nov. 15            Einstein and relativity; the image of Einstein.
Nov. 17            Atomic physics and the atomic bomb.
Nov. 19            The advent of Big Science.

Nov. 22            Molecular biology: DNA.
Nov. 24            The Double Helix and “Honest Jim.”

Nov. 29            Review: the physical sciences since 1820.
Dec. 1            Science and the modern world; course evaluation.
Dec. 3            Third exam (25%).

Reading assignments:          
            Aug. 27–Sept. 3: Hankins, 1–72.
              Sept. 8–20: Blackboard (Kuhn); Hankins, 72–190; Hunt, 13–19.
            Sept. 27–Oct. 4: Darwin, x–xx; Blackboard (Lamarck).
            Oct. 6–13: Darwin, 3–95, 107–211, 355–97; Blackboard (Darwin and Wallace).
            Oct. 18–25: Darwin, 212–30, 334–47; 397–425; Blackboard (Bowler).
            Nov. 1–15:  Hunt, 1–13, 19–167.
            Nov. 17–19: Blackboard (20th century physics).
           Nov. 22–24: Watson, xi–xxv, 1–145, 161–234.

Religious holy days: If a religious holy day will force you to miss a class or exam, notify Prof. Hunt at least two weeks in advance and he will give you an opportunity to make up the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Students with disabilities: On request, UT provides appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471‑6259 or 232–2937 (video phone).

HIS 350L • The Galileo Affair

39300 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 2.124
(also listed as R S 357 )
show description

The Galileo Affair                                                       
HIS 350L—39300            Prof. Bruce J. Hunt          
R S 357—43680            Office: GAR 2.106     232–6109
Fall 2010   MEZ 2.124            MW 11–12, W 2–3, and by appt. TuTh  3:30–5:00            bjhunt@mail.utexas.edu                                                                                     

This course will focus on the life and work of Galileo Galilei (1564–1642), particularly his conflict with Church authorities and his official condemnation in 1633.  We will also relate Galileo’s work to several broader contexts: the development of science in the 16th and 17th centuries; court life and patronage in early modern Italy; and the long history of relations between science and religion.

Each student will:

• lead or co-lead a class discussion on one of the topics listed below,

• write a 4–5 page paper related to that topic,

• write a 16–20 page research paper, a draft version of which will be presented to the class for discussion toward the end of the semester, and

• write a 2–3 page critique of a draft version of another student’s paper.

Course grades will be +/­– and will be based on your class presentation (15%), your papers (15% and 45%), your written critique (10%), and your participa­tion in class discussions (15%).  You will be expected to attend all class meetings, and your attendance will figure in your participation score. 

 

Readings:           

Richard J. Blackwell, Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible,
Dava Sobel, Galileo’s Daughter,
Galileo Galilei, The Essential Galileo (ed. Maurice Finocchiaro),
Maurice Finocchiaro (ed.), The Galileo Affair: A Documentary History,
plus a packet of readings available at Abel’s Copies, 715D West 23rd St.

Aug. 26           Intro­duction: aims and structure of the course.

Aug. 31    Political and religious background: Italy, 1500–1640; the Reformation and Counter

                    Reformation (Finocchiaro, 1–15; Blackwell, 5–27, 181–84; packet: Pedersen).

Sept. 2    Scientific background: early modern Aristotelianism and its critics (Finocchiaro, 15–43).

Sept. 7                Galileo’s origins, education, and early career (Galileo, 1–16; Sobel, 3–24).

Sept. 9      Galileo’s early experiments on motion (Galileo, 300–306, 334–51, 356–67;

                  packet: Settle; Drake and MacLachlan).

Sept. 14                Galileo and the telescope (Galileo, 45–84, 97–102; packet: Van Helden).

Sept. 16      Galileo, patronage, and the Medici court (Sobel, 25–58; packet: Biagioli; Shank; Westfall, “Science and Patronage”).

Sept. 21       Science and scripture: Galileo’s letters to Castelli and Christina (Sobel, 59–70; Finocchiaro, 47–118; Blackwell, 29–85).

Sept. 23      Foscarini, Bellarmine, and the 1616 “trial” (Sobel, 71–83; Finocchiaro, 134–53; Blackwell, 87–134, 217–76; packet: Westfall, “Bellarmino”).

Sept. 28                Choosing a topic and getting started on your research papers.

Sept. 30                Galileo on the Web and in the library: locating and evaluating source materials.

Oct. 5                 The Assayer and its aftermath. (Galileo, 179–89; Finocchiaro, 198–206; Sobel, 84­–152)

Oct. 7      The contentious publication of Galileo’s Dialogue. (Galileo, 190–271; Sobel, 153–227; Finocchiaro, 206–214; packet: Westfall, “Dialogue”)

Oct. 12                 Progress reports on research papers; allocation of presentation dates.       

Oct. 14    Galileo’s fall from favor: Pope Urban VIII and the events of 1632.

                        (Sobel, 231–241; Finocchiaro, 218-42; packet: Redondi)

Oct. 19                Galileo’s “second trial”: the initial Inquisition proceedings, 1633.

                        (Sobel, 242–281; Finocchiaro, 242–55)

Oct. 21    Double crossed?  Galileo’s interrogation, recantation, and condemnation, 1633.

                    (Finocchiaro, 256–93; packet: Blackwell)

Oct. 26    Galileo’s last years. (Sobel, 285–368)

Oct. 28    Retrying Galileo: the Galileo Affair since 1633.

                  (Blackwell, 135–79; packet: Finocchiaro; Pope John Paul II and Cardinal Poupard)

Nov. 2                Presentation and discussion of research papers.

Nov. 4                — No class —

Nov. 9                 Presentation and discussion of research papers.
Nov. 11                /
Nov. 16                /
Nov. 18                /
Nov. 23                /
Nov. 30                /
Dec.  2                /; course evaluation

Dec.  7                Papers due in my office for grading.

Religious holy days: If a religious holy day will force you to miss a class, notify Prof. Hunt at least two weeks in advance and he will give you an opportunity to make up the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Students with disabilities: On request, UT provides appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471‑6259 or 232–2937 (video phone).

HIS 322D • Scientif Revolutn Of 17th Cen

39510 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 GAR 0.102
show description

The Scientific Revolution of the 17th century produced a series of fundamental shifts in the way people have viewed the natural world and their own place in it.  In this course we will examine the roots and course of this revolution and trace the main outlines of the new world it helped to create.

Course grades will be +/- and will be based on three one-hour essay exams and a short paper on a topic to be assigned (25% each).

Readings (tentative list):

Galileo Galilei, The Essential Galileo (ed. Maurice Finocchiaro),

Peter Dear, Revolutionizing the Sciences (2nd edition, 2009),

James Gleick, Isaac Newton,

John Henry, Knowledge is Power,

Michael R. Matthews (ed.), The Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy



HIS 380K • History Of Science

39900 • Spring 2010
Meets TH 200pm-500pm PAR 8A
show description

This reading seminar is designed to introduce graduate students from a variety of backgrounds to the literature of the history of science and to the main schools of thought within the field. Toward that end, we will read and discuss a wide range of books and articles—some already “classic,” others perhaps on their way to becoming so—that shed light on some of the main themes and problems in the history of science and technology. In particular, we will examine the differing ways historians have addressed such issues as the shifting intellectual authority of science; the role social and cultural factors have played in shaping scientific knowledge; the relationship between scientific knowledge and technological practices; and the place science and technology have come to play in global and imperial contexts. 

Requirements:

Each student will be required to write a brief (2 page) response to each week’s readings, due before class, and to deliver at least one class presentation. Everyone will also be expected to take an active part in class discussions. Each student will also be required to write a 15–18 page historiographical essay on an appropriate topic of his or her choice, to be due toward the end of the semester.

Grading:

Grades will be based on the response essays (20%), the class presentations (10%), the historiographical essays (40%), and class participation (30%).

UGS 303 • Science And Art: Then And Now

64105-64130 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm GRG 102
show description

UGS 303—Science and Art: Then and Now                                   Spring 2010

GRG 102 Tu–Th 11–12:30

64105: Fri. 10–11

64110: Fri. 11–12

64115: Fri. 12–1

64120: Th. 2–3

64125: Th. 3–4

64130: Th. 4–5

Linda Henderson
Department of Art and Art History
DFA 2.122; Office Hours: Wed. 1-3

Bruce Hunt
Department of History
GAR 2.106; Office Hours: Tues. 2-4


This Signature Course seeks to introduce students to some of the ways science and art have interacted from the Renaissance to the present day.

Assigned readings will be made available in a course packet and through Blackboard.

Grades will be based on three exams (20% each), a research paper (20%), and participation in weekly discussion sections (20%); the latter will include some short written exercises.


19 Jan.     Introduction; style in art and science; Raphaels The School of Athens

21 Jan.     Life and learning in medieval and early modern Europe (Hunt)    

Sections:  MAI 220C—Get acquainted; hand out first short writing assignment


26 Jan.     Background to Renaissance art; debts to the classical past; fundamentals of painting (Henderson)

28 Jan.     Linear perspective and the geometrization of space (Henderson)              

Sections:  Meet at the Blanton Museum—Renaissance painting


2 Feb.       Leonardo da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius: art and anatomy (Henderson/Hunt)

4 Feb.       Anatomy, natural history, and the art of printing (Henderson/Hunt);

                 first short writing assignment due; hand out paper assignment and post list of topics

Sections:  Meet at the Harry Ransom Center—History of science collections


9 Feb.       Galileo, the telescope, and the depiction of the heavens (Hunt)

11 Feb.     Baroque science and art as spectacle (Hunt/Henderson)    

Sections: MAI 220C—Review for first exam; settle topics for research papers


16 Feb.     FIRST EXAM

18 Feb.     Newton on light and color (Hunt)

Sections: Meet at the PCL—Session on library research in the digital era


23 Feb.     Scientists as heroes in the 18th and 19th centuries (Hunt)

25 Feb.     The Romantic revolt in science and art (Henderson/Hunt)

Sections: Meet at the Blanton Museum—Print collection


 


2 March   Geology and “deep time” in the early 19th century (Hunt)            

4 March   Darwin and the theory of evolution (Hunt)

Sections: MAI 220C—Progress reports on research papers


9 March   Representing nature in the 19th. century: geology, evolution, and light (Henderson)

11 March Thermodynamics, entropy, and the heat death of the universe (Hunt)

No section meetings


— SPRING BREAK —


23 March Light waves, the ether, and electromagnetism (Hunt)

25 March The visible and the invisible in 19th-century photography (Henderson);

                 research papers due

Sections:  MAI 220C—Review for second exam


30 March EXAM 2

1 April     X-rays, atoms, and radioactivity (Hunt)

Sections: Meet at the Harry Ransom Center—Photography Collection


6 April     From visible to invisible nature: Cubism and Futurism (Henderson)

8 April     The fourth dimension of space and modern art (Henderson);

                 hand out short writing assignment on Einstein and popular culture

Sections:  MAI 220C—“Flatland”


13 April   Einstein and relativity (Hunt)

15 April   Art for the world of space-time (Henderson);

                 short papers on Einstein and popular culture due

Sections:  MAI 220C—Discuss Einstein and popular culture


20 April   Atomic power and the atomic bomb (Hunt)

22 April   Abstract expressionism, WWII, and the bomb (Henderson)

Sections: Meet at the Blanton Museum—Abstract Expressionist painting 


27 April   Thermodynamics and art: Marcel Duchamp’s Large Glass and Robert Smithson’s, Spiral Jetty (Henderson)

29 April   The expanding universe (Hunt)

Sections: MAI 220C—Review for third exam


4 May      Overview (Hunt, Henderson and class); course evaluation

6 May      THIRD EXAM

No section meetings

HIS 329P • History Of The Atomic Bomb-W

39875 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 2.112
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This course will focus on the development of nuclear weapons from the discovery of fission in 1938 to the Oppenheimer security hearings of 1954, with a brief look at later events. We will examine the scientific background behind the development of the first atomic bombs, the organization of the Manhattan Project, the American decision to use atomic bombs against Japanese cities, and the post-war debates over arms control and the development of the H-bomb.

This course carries both a writing flag and an ethics and leadership flag.

Course grades will be +/- and will be based will be based on a quiz (10%), a 12-14 page paper (50%), a 4 page paper (15%), an essay exam (15%), and class participation (10%).

Readings (tentative list):

Richard Rhodes, The Making of the Atomic Bomb,

Michael Stoff, et al., eds., The Manhattan Project,

John Hersey, Hiroshima,

Michael J. Hogan, ed., Hiroshima in History and Memory,

Herbert York, The Advisors: Oppenheimer, Teller, and the Superbomb,

Richard Polenberg, ed., In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer,

plus a course packet.

HIS 329U • Persp On Sci And Math-Uteach-W

39880-39885 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 PAI 4.18
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Course Description

Perspectives on Science and Math explores the intellectual, social, and cultural history of science and math from the Renaissance to the present. It is designed for students in UTeach Natural Sciences. The course has four interlocking goals: to give you an overview of the history of science and mathematics, for your general education and to help you reflect on your own reasons and goals for teaching science or math; to enable you to put this broader history and context to work in science and mathematics pedagogy; to improve your writing skills to competence or mastery; and likewise to improve you research and information analysis skills to competence of mastery. This is a writing flag class

 

The readings and lessons explore the why, how, and what of the history of science and math. We will attempt to identify and analyze the goals of natural philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians—why did they think the knowledge they made was important? We will investigate the practices by which people have established thecredibility or authority of knowledge—how did people agree on what was true? And we will study the content of theories—what did people know? While exploring these historical questions, we will pay especially close attention to the changing roles of science and math education. “We” is not a figure of speech here. This is a team taught class, and you are on the team. Nearly a third of the lessons will be developed and led by students. These lessons will focus especially on answering the last question; that is, what did people know?

 

There is a weekly discussion section connected to this course which students are required to attend.

 

Readings are posted on the course’s blackboard site. 

 

Grading Policies

 

Unless an extension is granted well in advance, the grade will drop a full letter for each day an assignment is late. “Sundry assignments” will not be accepted late. Plus/minus grades will be assigned. 

 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from Services for Students with Disabilities: 471-6259.

 

University policies on plagiarism and academic dishonesty will be enforced. 

 

 

 

Assignments

 

Participation: 15%

Attendance will be taken and factored into your grade. One unexcused absence is allowed. In addition, active and insightful engagement in the lessons will be rewarded—everyone is expected to participate in discussions. Attendance and participation in sections are included here.

 

Sundry Assignments: 10%

These are ungraded or plus-check-minus assignments completed in class or at home. Most are connected to a reading and are designed to improve comprehension and assure that students have completed the reading. They may include unannounced quizzes. 

 

Short Research Paper: 10%

This paper is closely linked to the 5E Lesson Plan (see below). Before preparing the 5E Lesson Plan with a partner, each student will research and write a three to four page essay exploring the subject of his/her lesson. 

 

5E Lesson Plan: 25%

Working in pairs, students will prepare, present, and revise one 5E Lesson Plan integrating a historical topic into a science or math lesson. These lessons are considered part of the class, and should focus on an interesting or important historical idea or method. The 5E Lesson Plans will be critical for providing the intellectual (as opposed to the social and cultural) history component of the course. Handouts, examples, rubrics, etc. will explain the assignment and establish clear expectations. 

 

Peer Review: 5%

Students will provide feedback to peers on 5E Lesson Plans and selected writing assignments.

 

Unit Reflections: 15% (5% each)

Two to four page written reflections on the readings, lectures, and discussions for each of the first three units. Due the Monday after the end of the unit.

 

Midterm Exam: 10%

The midterm will consist of identifications and short answer questions

 

Final Exam: 10%

The final exam will consist of identifications and short answer questions.

 

HIS 329U • Persp On Sci And Math-Uteach-W

39890-39895 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAI 4.18
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Perspectives on Science and Mathematics

HIS 329U-39880/39885                               Prof. Bruce J. Hunt      GAR 2.108
Fall 2009                                                      Tu 2-3:30, W 1-2, & by appt.
PAI  4.18  MWF 11 am-12 noon                      bjhunt@mail.utexas.edu

discussion sections:                                      TA:  Frank Benn        BUR 408
39880:  Mon. 12-1 pm                                   spall7@hotmail.com
39885:  Mon. 3-4 pm                                     UTeach Intern:   Elyse Zimmer
                                                                    elyse.zimmer@gmail.com

This course is part of  the UTeach-Natural Sciences program.  It is designed to give you a grasp of science and mathematics as both products of historical processes and factors in further change, and to equip you to use this understanding to enrich your own classroom teaching. This course carries a writing flag, and we will emphasize clear and effective writing on all assignments.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Books:        
Galileo Galilei, The Essential Galileo (ed. and trans.Maurice Finocchiaro),
        James D. Watson, The Double Helix (ed. Gunther Stent),
        plus additional readings to be made available via Blackboard

Grades will be based on:  
                10 short response essays (about 1 page each)                        10%
                short paper on an assigned topic (4-5 pages)                          5%
                longer paper on a topic of your choice (10-12 pages)              15%
                lesson plan and presentation                                                 15%
                report on your work with your lesson plan partner                   5%
                mid-term exam                                                                    10%
                final exam                                                                           20%
                class participation                                                                10%
                section participation                                                             10%

Final course grades will be given on a plus/minus scale. Attendance at all class and section meetings is required; unexcused absences will lead to a penalty on your grade.

University policies on plagiarism and academic dishonesty will be strictly observed.


Aug. 26        Introduction: aims and structure of the course
Aug. 28        Deep background: science and mathematics in history

Unit 1:  Galileo, Newton, and the Scientific Revolution
(read: Galileo, pp. 1-16,  45-84, 103-48, 163-67,  176-92, 300-306, 334-67)
Aug. 31        Aristotelian physics and Ptolemaic astronomy
Sept.  2        Copernicus, Kepler, and the motion of the Earth
Sept.  4        Galileo and the telescope

Sept.   9        Galileo, the Bible, and the motion of the Earth
Sept. 11        Demonstration of a 5E lesson plan

Sept. 14        Workshop on paper preparation
Sept. 16        Galileo and the mathematics of motion
Sept. 18        Isaac Newton and the mathematical principles of natural philosophy

Unit 2:  Darwin and Evolution by Natural Selection
Sept. 21       'The species question' before Charles Darwin; short papers due
Sept. 23        Young Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle
Sept. 25        Evolution by natural selection

Sept. 28        The Origin of Species: publication and controversy
Sept. 30        Modern evolutionary theory: the neo-Darwinian synthesis
Oct.  2          5E presentation

Oct.  5        'Apes or angels': evolution, religion, and the question of human nature
Oct.  7        Controversies over teaching evolution in schools
Oct. 9        5E presentation

Oct. 12        mid-term exam
Oct. 14        Teaching and testing: the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos
Oct. 16        5E presentation; deadline to meet to discuss the topic of your long paper

Unit 3:  The Atomic Bomb
Oct. 19        Radioactivity and the beginnings of nuclear physics
Oct. 21        Fission: how to make an atomic bomb
Oct. 23        5E presentation

Oct. 26        The Manhattan Project
Oct. 28        The decision to drop atomic bombs on Japanese cities
Oct. 30        5E presentation; long paper proposal and preliminary bibliography due

Nov.  2        The Oppenheimer case
Nov.  4         film: 'The Day After Trinity,' excerpts
Nov.  6        5E presentation

Unit 4:  Genetics & DNA (read: Watson, pp. xi-xxv, 1-133, 137-45, 153-58, 185-87, 213-18)
Nov. 9        Heredity and genetics: Mendel and the Mendelians
Nov. 11        Eugenics
Nov. 13        5E presentation; long papers due

Nov. 16        DNA: the physical basis of the gene
Nov. 18         5E presentation
Nov. 20        - no class -

Nov. 23        'Honest Jim': publication and controversy
Nov. 25        - film: 'The Race for the Double Helix'

Nov. 30        Contemporary issues in genetics; revised long papers due
Dec.  2        5E presentation
Dec.  4        final discussion; course evaluation

Dec.  9        Final exam, 7-10 pm (room to be announced)

HIS 380K • History Of Science

40210 • Fall 2009
Meets W 200pm-500pm GAR 2.124
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This reading seminar is designed to introduce graduate students from a variety of backgrounds to the literature of the history of science and to the main schools of thought within the field. Toward that end, we will read and discuss a wide range of books and articles—some already “classic,” others perhaps on their way to becoming so—that shed light on some of the main themes and problems in the history of science and technology. In particular, we will examine the differing ways historians have addressed such issues as the shifting intellectual authority of science; the role social and cultural factors have played in shaping scientific knowledge; the relationship between scientific knowledge and technological practices; and the place science and technology have come to play in global and imperial contexts. 

Requirements:

Each student will be required to write a brief (2 page) response to each week’s readings, due before class, and to deliver at least one class presentation. Everyone will also be expected to take an active part in class discussions. Each student will also be required to write a 15–18 page historiographical essay on an appropriate topic of his or her choice, to be due toward the end of the semester.

Grading:

Grades will be based on the response essays (20%), the class presentations (10%), the historiographical essays (40%), and class participation (30%).

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