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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Jacqueline Jones

Professor Ph.D., 1976, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Professor; Chair, History Department; Walter Prescott Webb Chair in History, Ideas; Mastin Gentry White Prof. of So. History
Jacqueline Jones

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-3261
  • Office: GAR 1.106A
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: TWTH 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography


Courses taught

  • The United States Since 1865
  • Classics in American Autobiography
  • Social History of the Confederate States of America
  • The U. S. South
  • Graduate Research Seminar at the Briscoe Center for American History 


Book Publications

  • A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama’s America (Basic Books: December, 2013) 
  • Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow:  Black Women, Work and the Family from Slavery to the Present, 25th Anniversary Edition, Revised and Updated (Basic, 2010; originally published 1985) 
  • Saving Savannah:  The City and the Civil War, 1854-1872 (Alfred A. Knopf, 2008; pb Vintage, 2009) 
  • Created Equal: A History of the United States with Peter Wood, Elaine Tyler May, Tim Borstelmann, and Vicki Ruiz (college text) (Prentice-Hall/Pearson, 2003; Fourth Edition, July, 2013) [chapters 9-18 covering the period 1790-1900] 
  • Creek Walking: Growing Up in Delaware in the 1950s (University of Delaware Press, 2001) 
  • A Social History of the Laboring Classes from Colonial Times to the Present (Blackwell Publishers, 1999) 
  • American Work: Four Centuries of Black and White Labor (W. W. Norton, 1998; pb., Norton, 1999)
  • The Dispossessed: America’s Underclasses from the Civil War to the Present (Basic Books, 1992; pb. Basic, 1994)
  • Soldiers of Light and Love: Northern Teachers and Georgia Blacks, 1865-1873 (University of North Carolina Press, 1980; pb. University of Georgia Press, 1992)


Current Project

  • The Life and Times of Lucy Parsons (1851-1942)


Awards/Honors

Finalist, Pulitzer Prize for History (for Dreadful Deceit and Labor of Love); Vice President for the Professional Division, American Historical Association (2011-14); MacArthur Fellowship (1999-2004); member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Bancroft Prize in American History: Taft Prize in Labor History; Spruill Prize in Southern Women's History; Brown Publication Prize in Black Women's History; Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer; plus research grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Social Science Research Council.

HIS 389 • Research Seminar In Us History

39930 • Fall 2014
Meets W 200pm-500pm SRH 2.114
show description

This course meets weekly (Wednesdays from 2 to 5) at the Briscoe Center for American History.  Students will learn about the center’s rich archival resources; read and discuss historical essays that cover a variety of topics and utilize a variety of analytical frameworks and research methodologies; and conduct their own their own semester-long research project based on the center’s holdings.  Course objectives include examining the art of the historical essay; encouraging students to hone their organizational, research, analytical, and writing skills; discussing a variety of primary sources in their socio-historical context; exploring the process of completing a scholarly essay, from choosing a topic to locating sources, considering relevant secondary works, telling a story and making an argument in the space of 30 pages or so, and rewriting and revising to produce a final draft; and submitting an essay to a scholarly journal for publication.

Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the center’s website (http://www.cah.utexas.edu/) and to check it regularly for update.

Texts:

Aron, Stephen. “The Afterlives of Lewis and Clark.” Southern California Quarterly, 87 (Spring 2005):27-46.

Arsenault, Raymond.  “The End of the Long Hot Summer:  The Air Conditioner and Southern Culture.” Journal of Southern History 50 (Nov. 1984):597-28.

Buzzanco, Robert. “What Happened to the New Left? Toward a Radical Reading of American Foreign Relations.” Diplomatic History, 23 (Fall 1999): 575-607.

Clarke, Frances. “So Lonesome I Could Die: Nostalgia and Debates Over Emotional Control in the Civil War North.” Journal of Social History, 41 (Winter 2007): 253-282.

Cohen, David S. “How Dutch Were the Dutch of New Netherland?” New York History 62 (Jan., 1981): 43-60.

Daniel, Pete.  “African American Farmers and Civil Rights.” Journal of Southern History 73 (Feb. 2007):3-38.

Davis, Natalie Z. “Printing and the People.” In Society and Culture in Early Modern France: Eight Essays. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1975.

Dayton, Cornelia.  “Taking the Trade:  Abortion and Gender Relations in an Eighteenth-Century New England Village.” William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Series, 48 (Jan. 1991):19-49.

Desrochers, Robert E. Jr. “’Not Fade Away’:  The Narrative of Venture Smith, an African American in the Early Republic.”  Journal of American History, 84 (June 1997):40-66.

Goodwyn, Lawrence E.  “Populist Dreams and Negro Rights:  East Texas as a Case Study.” American Historical Review, 76 (Dec. 1971):1435-56.

Guglielmo, Thomas A.  “Fighting for Caucasian Rights:  Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and the Transnational Struggle for Civil Rights in World War II Texas.”  Journal of American History, 92 (March 2006):1212-37.

Haskell, Thomas. “Persons as Uncaused Causes: John Stuart Mill, the Spirit of Capitalism, and the ‘Invention’ of Formalism.” In Objectivity is Not Neutrality. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.

Higginbotham, Evelyn Brooks.  “African-American Women’s History and the Metalanguage of Race.” Signs 17 (1992):251-74.

Jung, Moon-Ho. “Outlawing ‘Coolies’: Race, Nation, and Empire in the Age of Emanicpation.”  American Quarterly 57 (Sept. 2005)

Kelley, Robin D. G. “’We Are Not What We Seem’:  Rethinking Black Working-Class Opposition in the Jim Crow South.”  Journal of American History 80 (June 1993):75-112.

Kramer, Paul A.  “Empire, Exceptions, and Anglo-Saxons:  Race and Rule Between the British and United States Empires, 1880-1910.” Journal of American History 88 (March 2002):1315-1353.

Paul A. Kramer. "Making Concessions: Race and Empire Revisited at the Philippine Exposition, St. Louis,1901-1905." Radical History Review 73 (1999): 74-114.

Lugo, Alejandro.  “Theorizing Border Inspections.” Cultural Dynamics 12 (2000):353-73.

Miller, Perry.  “Errand Into the Wilderness.” Willliam and Mary Quarterly, 10 (Jan. 1953):4-32.

Morgan, Phillip. “Work and Culture: The Task System and the World of Lowcountry Blacks, 1700 to 1880.” William and Mary Quarterly 39 (Oct., 1982): 564-599.

Nasstrom, Kathryn L. “Down to Now: Memory, Narrative, and Women’s Leadership in the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta, Georgia.” Gender & History 11 (April 1999): 113-44.

Norton, Mary Beth. “The Evolution of White Women’s Experience in Early America.”  American Historical Review, 89 (June 1984):593-619.

Paredes, Americo. “On Ethnographic Work among Minority Groups: A Folklorist’s Perspective,” in Folklore and Culture on the Texas-Mexican Border, ed. Richard Bauman. Austin: CMAS Books, Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texas at Austin, 1993.

Pells, Richard. “History Descending a Staircase:  American Historians and American Culture.” Chronicle Review, August 3, 2007.

Pessen, Edward.  “How Different from Each Other Were the Antebellum North and South?” American Historical Review, 85 (Dec. 1980):1119-1149.

Roosevelt, Theodore.  “History as Literature [AHA Presidential Address, 1912]. http://www.historians.org/info/AHA_history/troosevelt.htm

Rosen, Hannah. “’Not That Sort of Women’: Race, Gender, and Sexual Violence in the Memphis Riot of 1866.” In Sex, Love, and Race: Crossing Boundaries in North American History, ed. Martha Hodes, pp. 267-93. New York: New York University Press, 1999.

Rushdie, Salman.  “Step Across This Line.” In Step Across This Line:  Collected Nonfiction, 1992-2002.  New York: Modern Library, 2002.

Schwarz, Maureen Trudelle. “The Explanatory and Predictive Power of History: Coping with the ‘Mystery Illness.” Ethnohistory, 42 (Summer 1993): 375-401.

Spence, Jonathan. “Food,” in Chinese Roundabout. New York: W.W. Norton, 1992.

Stampp, Kenneth M. “The Concept of a Perpetual Union,” in The Imperiled Union: Essays on the Background of the Civil War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.

----------. “The Southern Road to Appomattox,” in The Imperiled Union: Essays on the Background of the Civil War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.

Sugrue, Thomas J.  “Crabgrass-Roots Politics: Race, Rights, and the Reaction Against Liberalism in the Urban North, 1940-1964.” Journal of American History 82 (Sept. 1995):551-78.

Turner, Frederick Jackson. “The Significance of the Frontier in American History.” Harold P. Simonson, ed. New York: Unger, 1963.

Walker, Juliet E. K. “Oprah Winfrey, The Tycoon: Contextualizing the Economics of Race, Class, and Gender in Black Business History in Post-Civil Rights America.” In Black Business and Economic Power, eds. Alusine Jalloh and Toyin Falola, pp. 484-525. Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2002.

---------. “Promoting Black Entrepreneurship and Business Enterprise in Antebellum America: The National Negro Convention, 1830-1855,” in A Different Vision: Race and Public Policy, ed. Thomas D. Boston, pp. 280-318. London: Routledge Press, 1997

---------. "Racism, Slavery, Free Enterprise: Black Entrepreneurship in the United States before the Civil War," Business History Review 60, 3 (Autumn 1986): 343-382

­­­----------.  “Trade and Markets in Precolonial West and West Central Africa:  The Cultural Foundation of the African American Business Tradition.” In Thomas Boston, ed.  A Different Vision, Vol. 289 (June 1984):593-619.iewca.".f Race.". New York: Routledge, 1997.

-----------. “White Corporate America:  The New Arbiter of Race?”  In Kenneth Lipartito and David B. Sicilia, eds., Constructing Corporate America: History, Politics, Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

Young, Alfred F. “George Robert Twelves Hewes (1742-1840): A Boston Shoemaker and the Memory of the American Revolution.” William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd series, 38 (Oct. 1981):562-63.

Grading:

   Students will be evaluated on the basis of the following criteria:

In-class presentation:   10 percent

Final research paper:    70 percent

Attendance, participation, weekly summaries, commitment to the course: 20 percent

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39700 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 1.402
show description

This course covers the major developments in American history from the end of the Civil War to the present.  Topics include foreign immigration, the growth of cities, America’s rise as a global power, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and dramatic transformations in the country’s economy and society over the last half century.  We shall consider the modern United States in all its social diversity, and the efforts by minority groups to achieve full political rights.  

 

Readings include:

Jones, Wood, Borstelmann, May, and Ruiz, Created Equal: A History of the United States (Vol. II, Brief Edition)

Supplementary readings by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Hamlin Garland, Ellen Glasgow, and Henry Louis Gates, among others.  

 

Student evaluation will be based on two semester in-class examinations, and one final examination, as well as on attendance and commitment to the course.

HIS 392 • Reading Seminar On Us South

40195 • Fall 2013
Meets W 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
show description

This readings seminar meets weekly for three hours on Wednesday morning.  We shall survey the broad sweep of U. S. southern history, beginning with the fragile Jamestown settlement and ending with the “global South” of the early twenty-first century.  Readings will include classics in the field, as well as more recent monographs, and scholarly essays.  We’ll seek to define the South and its peculiar characteristics—its persistent poverty and rurality, obsession with racial ideologies, conservative politics, and post-World War II economic, social and political transformations.  Topics include the origins of slavery, the nature of the slave trade, the American Revolution in the South, politics and society in the antebellum period, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the foundations of the “Solid South” of 1900, labor patterns, radical insurgencies on the countryside, and ethnic diversity in the late twentieth century and onward.

 

Texts:

In addition to a number of articles, required readings will probably include (but are not limited to) the following books: Morgan, American Slavery, American Freedom, Rediker, Slave Ship; Johnson, Soul by Soul; Clarke, Dwelling Place; Foner, Reconstruction; Dailey, Before Jim Crow; Ayers, Promise of the New South; Dowd Hall, Like a Family; Kelley, Hammer and Hoe; Fink, The Maya of Morganton; and Peacock et al., The American South in a Global World.

 

Grading:

Assignments include a weekly response paper based on the readings under review for that class, a mid-term take-home dealing with the readings and discussions up to that point in the semester, and a major historiographical essay on the topic of the student’s choosing.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39335 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 1.402
show description

This course covers the major developments in American history from the end of the Civil War to the present.  Topics include foreign immigration, the growth of cities, America’s rise as a global power, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and dramatic transformations in the country’s economy and society over the last half century.  We shall consider the modern United States in all its social diversity, and the efforts by minority groups to achieve full political rights.  

 

Readings include:

Jones, Wood, Borstelmann, May, and Ruiz, Created Equal: A History of the United States (Vol. II, Brief Edition)

Supplementary readings by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Hamlin Garland, Ellen Glasgow, and Henry Louis Gates, among others.  

 

Student evaluation will be based on two semester in-class examinations, and one final examination, as well as on attendance and commitment to the course.

HIS 389 • Us History: Research

39740 • Fall 2012
Meets W 200pm-500pm SRH 2.114
show description

This course meets weekly (Wednesdays from 2 to 5) at the Briscoe Center for American History.  Students will learn about the center’s rich archival resources; read and discuss historical essays that cover a variety of topics and utilize a variety of analytical frameworks and research methodologies; and conduct their own their own semester-long research project based on the center’s holdings.  Course objectives include examining the art of the historical essay; encouraging students to hone their organizational, research, analytical, and writing skills; discussing a variety of primary sources in their socio-historical context; exploring the process of completing a scholarly essay, from choosing a topic to locating sources, considering relevant secondary works, telling a story and making an argument in the space of 30 pages or so, and rewriting and revising to produce a final draft; and submitting an essay to a scholarly journal for publication.

Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the center’s website (http://www.cah.utexas.edu/) and to check it regularly for updates

Evaluation

   Students will be evaluated on the basis of the following criteria:

In-class presentation:   10 percent

Final research paper:    70 percent

Attendance, participation, weekly summaries, commitment to the course: 20 percent

Texts

Aron, Stephen. “The Afterlives of Lewis and Clark.” Southern California Quarterly, 87 (Spring 2005):27-46.

Arsenault, Raymond.  “The End of the Long Hot Summer:  The Air Conditioner and Southern Culture.” Journal of Southern History 50 (Nov. 1984):597-28.

Buzzanco, Robert. “What Happened to the New Left? Toward a Radical Reading of American Foreign Relations.” Diplomatic History, 23 (Fall 1999): 575-607.

Clarke, Frances. “So Lonesome I Could Die: Nostalgia and Debates Over Emotional Control in the Civil War North.” Journal of Social History, 41 (Winter 2007): 253-282.

Cohen, David S. “How Dutch Were the Dutch of New Netherland?” New York History 62 (Jan., 1981): 43-60.

Daniel, Pete.  “African American Farmers and Civil Rights.” Journal of Southern History 73 (Feb. 2007):3-38.

Davis, Natalie Z. “Printing and the People.” In Society and Culture in Early Modern France: Eight Essays. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1975.

Dayton, Cornelia.  “Taking the Trade:  Abortion and Gender Relations in an Eighteenth-Century New England Village.” William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Series, 48 (Jan. 1991):19-49.

Desrochers, Robert E. Jr. “’Not Fade Away’:  The Narrative of Venture Smith, an African American in the Early Republic.”  Journal of American History, 84 (June 1997):40-66.

Goodwyn, Lawrence E.  “Populist Dreams and Negro Rights:  East Texas as a Case Study.” American Historical Review, 76 (Dec. 1971):1435-56.

Guglielmo, Thomas A.  “Fighting for Caucasian Rights:  Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and the Transnational Struggle for Civil Rights in World War II Texas.”  Journal of American History, 92 (March 2006):1212-37.

Haskell, Thomas. “Persons as Uncaused Causes: John Stuart Mill, the Spirit of Capitalism, and the ‘Invention’ of Formalism.” In Objectivity is Not Neutrality. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.

Higginbotham, Evelyn Brooks.  “African-American Women’s History and the Metalanguage of Race.” Signs 17 (1992):251-74.

Jung, Moon-Ho. “Outlawing ‘Coolies’: Race, Nation, and Empire in the Age of Emanicpation.”  American Quarterly 57 (Sept. 2005)

Kelley, Robin D. G. “’We Are Not What We Seem’:  Rethinking Black Working-Class Opposition in the Jim Crow South.”  Journal of American History 80 (June 1993):75-112.

Kramer, Paul A.  “Empire, Exceptions, and Anglo-Saxons:  Race and Rule Between the British and United States Empires, 1880-1910.” Journal of American History 88 (March 2002):1315-1353.

Paul A. Kramer. "Making Concessions: Race and Empire Revisited at the Philippine Exposition, St. Louis,1901-1905." Radical History Review 73 (1999): 74-114.

Lugo, Alejandro.  “Theorizing Border Inspections.” Cultural Dynamics 12 (2000):353-73.

Miller, Perry.  “Errand Into the Wilderness.” Willliam and Mary Quarterly, 10 (Jan. 1953):4-32.

Morgan, Phillip. “Work and Culture: The Task System and the World of Lowcountry Blacks, 1700 to 1880.” William and Mary Quarterly 39 (Oct., 1982): 564-599.

Nasstrom, Kathryn L. “Down to Now: Memory, Narrative, and Women’s Leadership in the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta, Georgia.” Gender & History 11 (April 1999): 113-44.

Norton, Mary Beth. “The Evolution of White Women’s Experience in Early America.”  American Historical Review, 89 (June 1984):593-619.

Paredes, Americo. “On Ethnographic Work among Minority Groups: A Folklorist’s Perspective,” in Folklore and Culture on the Texas-Mexican Border, ed. Richard Bauman. Austin: CMAS Books, Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texas at Austin, 1993.

Pells, Richard. “History Descending a Staircase:  American Historians and American Culture.” Chronicle Review, August 3, 2007.

Pessen, Edward.  “How Different from Each Other Were the Antebellum North and South?” American Historical Review, 85 (Dec. 1980):1119-1149.

Roosevelt, Theodore.  “History as Literature [AHA Presidential Address, 1912]. http://www.historians.org/info/AHA_history/troosevelt.htm

Rosen, Hannah. “’Not That Sort of Women’: Race, Gender, and Sexual Violence in the Memphis Riot of 1866.” In Sex, Love, and Race: Crossing Boundaries in North American History, ed. Martha Hodes, pp. 267-93. New York: New York University Press, 1999.

Rushdie, Salman.  “Step Across This Line.” In Step Across This Line:  Collected Nonfiction, 1992-2002.  New York: Modern Library, 2002.

Schwarz, Maureen Trudelle. “The Explanatory and Predictive Power of History: Coping with the ‘Mystery Illness.” Ethnohistory, 42 (Summer 1993): 375-401.

Spence, Jonathan. “Food,” in Chinese Roundabout. New York: W.W. Norton, 1992.

Stampp, Kenneth M. “The Concept of a Perpetual Union,” in The Imperiled Union: Essays on the Background of the Civil War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.

----------. “The Southern Road to Appomattox,” in The Imperiled Union: Essays on the Background of the Civil War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.

Sugrue, Thomas J.  “Crabgrass-Roots Politics: Race, Rights, and the Reaction Against Liberalism in the Urban North, 1940-1964.” Journal of American History 82 (Sept. 1995):551-78.

Turner, Frederick Jackson. “The Significance of the Frontier in American History.” Harold P. Simonson, ed. New York: Unger, 1963.

Walker, Juliet E. K. “Oprah Winfrey, The Tycoon: Contextualizing the Economics of Race, Class, and Gender in Black Business History in Post-Civil Rights America.” In Black Business and Economic Power, eds. Alusine Jalloh and Toyin Falola, pp. 484-525. Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2002. 

---------. “Promoting Black Entrepreneurship and Business Enterprise in Antebellum America: The National Negro Convention, 1830-1855,” in A Different Vision: Race and Public Policy, ed. Thomas D. Boston, pp. 280-318. London: Routledge Press, 1997.

---------. "Racism, Slavery, Free Enterprise: Black Entrepreneurship in the United States before the Civil War," Business History Review 60, 3 (Autumn 1986): 343-382

­­­----------.  “Trade and Markets in Precolonial West and West Central Africa:  The Cultural Foundation of the African American Business Tradition.” In Thomas Boston, ed.  A Different Vision, Vol. 289 (June 1984):593-619.iewca.".f Race.". New York: Routledge, 1997.

-----------. “White Corporate America:  The New Arbiter of Race?”  In Kenneth Lipartito and David B. Sicilia, eds., Constructing Corporate America: History, Politics, Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

Young, Alfred F. “George Robert Twelves Hewes (1742-1840): A Boston Shoemaker and the Memory of the American Revolution.” William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd series, 38 (Oct. 1981):562-63.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39195 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 106
show description

This course covers the major developments in American history from the end of the Civil War to the present.  Topics include foreign immigration, the growth of cities, America’s rise as a global power, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and dramatic transformations in the country’s economy and society over the last half century.  We shall consider the modern United States in all its social diversity, and the efforts by minority groups to achieve full political rights.  

 

Readings include:

Jones, Wood, Borstelmann, May, and Ruiz, Created Equal: A History of the United States (Vol. II, Brief Edition)

Supplementary readings by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Hamlin Garland, Ellen Glasgow, and Henry Louis Gates, among others.  

 

Student evaluation will be based on two semester in-class examinations, and one final examination, as well as on attendance and commitment to the course.

HIS 392 • 19th-Century Southern History

39693 • Fall 2011
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 1.122
show description

This readings course will focus on classic and recent monographs in nineteenth-century Southern history.  We shall examine slavery, the rise of southern “nationalism,” the Confederate States of American and Reconstruction, segregation and disfranchisement, and the rise of the Populist Party.  Unifying themes include class, gender and labor relations; the idea of southern “exceptionalism”; and the tension between federal prerogatives and states’ rights.

HIS 389 • Research Seminar In Us History

40055 • Spring 2011
Meets W 200pm-500pm SRH 2.114
show description

This course meets weekly (Wednesdays from 2 to 5) at the Briscoe Center for American History.  Students will learn about the Center’s rich archival resources; read and discuss historical essays that cover a variety of topics and utilize a variety of research methodologies; and conduct their own semester-long research project based on the Center’s holdings.

HIS 350L • Social Hist Of Confederacy-W

39680 • Spring 2010
Meets W 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.118
show description

Spring, 2010                                                                                                       Prof. Jones
HIS 350L, Unique # 39680                                                                          Office: GAR 2.109
3-6 PM Wednesday                                                            Office Hours: 10-11 T, Th; 2-3 Wed.   
Mez. 1.118                                                                                        jjones@mail.utexas.edu
                                                                                                                ph: 512-471-4193                                                                                                            

SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA

Required readings:

  Charles D. Grear, ed.  The Fate of Texas:  The Civil War and the Lone Star State
  Emory Thomas, The Confederate Nation: 1861-1865
  Susie King Taylor, Reminiscences of My Life in Camp (ed. by Catherine Clinton)
  Jacqueline Jones, Saving Savannah: The City and the Civil War (distributed to class members free of charge)

 

Also:
Online material: Documents packet and Mary Boykin Chesnut, Diary  (http://docsouth.unc.edu/chesnut/maryches.html)

      In this course we shall examine the creation of the Confederacy, and the brief life and enduring legacy of the would-be new nation.   The secessionists of 1860 and 1861 unleashed military, social, and political forces that produced a number of dramatic, unanticipated consequences for the South and its people.  We’ll explore the conflicting perspectives of various overlapping groups-- secessionists and Unionists; planters and politicians; slaves, free people of color, and freedpeople; women; urban workers; slaveholders and yeoman farmers; immigrants and Native Americans.  We’ll consider racial and gender ideologies, class relations, and regional diversity in an effort to avoid generalizing about "the solid South" during this period of armed conflict and political upheaval.

    Among other issues, we’ll consider the causes of the war; the Confederacy within the context of the American republican tradition; wartime mobilization and the destruction of the slave system; the effects of Confederate military strategies on the well-being of civilians and the fortunes of political leaders; national centralization policies and resistance to them by states' rights ideologues; the role of class conflict in the formation and defeat of the Confederacy; the suspect loyalties of mountain folk, Cherokee Indians, and immigrant workers; enslaved workers as a subversive force within the Confederacy; black and white families and their influence on manpower mobilization; dissent on the countryside and desertion within the rebel army; the environmental impact of the war; and patterns of change and continuity in the postwar South. 

   This course meets once a week—Wednesdays from 3 to 6 PM.  Students should come to class prepared to discuss the required reading assignments listed on the syllabus (see below) for that day.  

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259, or Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6441.  

    A student who is absent from a class or examination for the observance of a religious holiday may complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence, provided the student has notified the instructor in writing of the dates he or she will be absent.  Notification must be made two weeks prior to the absence or on the first class day if the absence will occur during the first two weeks of class.  In addition, the notification must be personally delivered to the instructor and signed and dated by the instructor, or sent certified mail with a return receipt request.  A student who fails to complete missed work within the time allowed will be subject to the normal academic penalties.

     Please note: Academic integrity is central to the mission of the university.  Each student is expected to turn in work completed independently, except when assignments specifically authorize collaborative effort.  It is not acceptable to use the words or ideas of another person without proper acknowledgement of that source.  This means that you must use footnotes and quotation marks to indicate the source of any phrases, sentences, paragraphs, or ideas found in published volumes, on the internet, or created by another student.

EXPECTATIONS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are requirements of this course.

 

    Assignments include:

1)   Writing two 5-page papers exploring a one-page primary source. Due dates:  Feb. 24, March 31.
2)   Completing a final research paper, 15-20 pages in length.  Students will be evaluated on the basis not only of the final product, but also steps along the way—choosing a topic in a timely manner, compiling a bibliography, putting together an outline.
3)   Writing a weekly 1-page “response” paper focused on that day’s readings.  This  paper should also include 3 or 4 questions that can serve as a basis for class discussion.
4)   Leading a discussion:  Each student will be responsible for leading at least one in- class discussion of a section of the material under review that week.
5)   Presenting a brief report on research findings:  Each student will present a brief in-class report on his or her research project.

 

Sample online resources:
Documenting the American South: http://docsouth.unc.edu/
Library of Congress: American Memory:  http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query
Library of Congress:  Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’
    Project, 1936-1938:  http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/snhtml/
Freedmen and Southern Society Project: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/snhtml/
Nineteenth-Century Newspapers: UT Library Database
Official Records of the Confederate Army and Navy
:
        http://cdl.library.cornell.edu/moa/browse/monographs/waro.html
Database clearinghouse:  http://www.academicinfo.net/usindcw.html
Civil War Women:
       http://library.duke.edu/specialcollections/bingham/guides/cwdocs/html
Diaries, Letters, Memoirs:
      http://www.homepages.dsu.edu/JANKEJ/CIVILWAR/diaries.htm

 

Due Dates:
First short paper: Feb. 24
Topic for final paper due: March 10
Second short paper: March 31
Bibliography for final paper due: April 7
Outline for final paper due:  April 21
Final paper due: May 7

Please note that due dates are listed so that you can schedule your time and plan accordingly.  Late papers will be penalized.  Computer problems do not constitute a sufficient excuse for late papers.  Please keep either an electronic file or a hard copy of any paper you turn in.

Student evaluation will be based on the following criteria:
First short paper: 20 percent
Second short paper: 20 percent
Final paper: 40 percent
Commitment to the course (discussion questions, class attendance and participation): 20 percent

 

Week I, Jan. 20    INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

 

Week II, Jan. 27  THE SLAVEHOLDERS’ DEFENSE
                             Jones, Prologue and Chaps. 1, 2, pp. 3-50
                             Thomas, Chapters 1, 2, pp. 1-36
                             Documents 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9A

 

Week III, Feb. 3   SECESSION:  HOW SOLID WAS THE SOUTH IN 1860-61?
                              Thomas, Chapter 3, pp. 37-66 and CSA Constitution, pp. 307-22       
                              Jones, Chaps. 3, 4, pp. 71-116
                              Documents 9, 9B, 10, 11
Presentation: “Research Papers in the Humanities”

 

 

Week IV, Feb. 10   MOBILZATION FOR A WAR FOR STATES’ RIGHTS
                                Thomas, Chapters 4, 5, pp. 67-119
                                Jones, Chap. 5, 117-139
                                Grear, ed., pp. 1-24
                                Documents 12, 13

 

Week V, Feb. 17   THE PLANTERS’ DILEMMA
                               Grear, 37-52
                               Jones, Chap. 6, pp. 140-163
                               Documents 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19

 

Week VI, Feb. 24     THE CRUMBLING OF SLAVERY
                                  Jones, Chap. 7, pp. 164-185
          (Meet in PCL 1.339 for a research tutorial.)                                

SHORT PAPER DUE

 

Week VII, March 3    AFRICAN-AMERICAN “TRAITORS” TO THE                      
                                           CONFEDERATE CAUSE: RUNAWAYS, SPIES, SCOUTS
                                    King Taylor, 1-76
                                    Documents 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35

 

Week VIII, March 10   A POOR MAN’S FIGHT?
                                      Thomas, Chapters 6, 7, 8:  pp. 120-89
                                      Grear, pp. 53-68
                                      Documents 21, 22

 

Week IX, March 24   THE ETHNIC CONFEDERACY
                                    Grear, ed., pp. 105-120
                                    Thomas, Chapters 9, 10, 11:  pp. 190-244
                                    Document 20

 

Week X, March 31    [research]                              

SHORT PAPER DUE

 

 

Week XI, April 7     WOMEN OF THE CONFEDERACY
                                  Grear, ed., pp. 25-36, 69-82
                                  Mary Boykin Chesnut, Diary (online, selections)
                                                      (http://docsouth.unc.edu/chesnut/maryches.html)
                                  Documents 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

Research paper bibliography due

 

Week XII, April 14   THE DEBATE OVER ARMING THE SLAVES
                                   Jones, Chap. 8, 186-212
                                   Document 38

 

Week XIII, April 21     [research]

 

OUTLINE OF FINAL PAPER DUE

 

Week XIV, April 28    WHY DID THE SOUTH LOSE THE WAR?
                                      Thomas, Chap. 12, pp. 278-306
                                      Jones, Chaps. 9-16 and Epilogue, pp. 213-410 (selections)
                                      Documents 36, 37, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 465, 47, 48, 49

 

Week XV, May 5   MEMORIALIZING THE WAR
                                Grear, ed., pp. 121-96

Final paper due, May 7

HIS 331C • The South Since 1865

39960 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm JGB 2.218
show description

HIS 345M: THE SOUTH SINCE 1865

Required Books:

William Link and Marjorie Spruill Wheeler, eds., The South in the History of the Nation: A Reader: Vol. Two: From Reconstruction (Bedford/St. Martin's, 1999)

Jeffrey P. Moran, ed., The Scopes Trial:  A Brief History with Documents (Bedford St. Martin's, 2002)

 David G. Garrow, ed., The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Women Who Started It:  The Memoir of Jo Ann Gibson Robinson (University of Tennessee Press, 1987)

Alex Lichtenstein, ed., Howard Kester, Revolt Among the Sharecroppers (University of Tennessee Press, 1997)

Jacqueline J. Royster, ed., Southern Horrors and Other Writings:  The Anti-Lynching Campaign of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1900

Additional readings posted on Blackboard:

Elaine Frantz Parsons, "Midnight Rangers:  Costume and Performance in the Reconstruction-Era Ku Klux Klan," Journal of American History 92 (Dec. 2005):811-36

Lawrence Goodwyn, "Populist Dreams and Negro Rights:  East Texas as a Case Study," American Historical Review 76 (Dec. 1971):1435-1456

Robin D. G. Kelley, "'We Are Not What We Seem':  Rethinking Black Working-Class Opposition in the Jim Crow South," Journal of American History 80 (Jun.1993):75-112

Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)

Andrew Doyle, "Turning the Tide:  College Football and Southern Progressivism,"  Southern Cultures 3 (1997):28-51

Ellen Glasgow, "The Difference"

Thomas A. Guglielmo, "Fighting for Caucasian Rights:  Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and the Transnational Struggle for Civil Rights in World War II Texas, "Journal of American History (March 2006):1212-1237

The Rev. Jerry Falwell, excerpt from Listen America! (1980)

Manuel Pastor, et al., "In the Wake of the Storm:  Environment, Disaster, and Race After Katrina" (Russell Sage Foundation)

childlabor[1]

Doffers at the Bibb Mill No. 1, Macon, Georgia, 1909 (Lewis Hine)

     This course meets twice a week-Tuesday and Thursday, 11 to 12:30. Students should come to class prepared to discuss the required reading assignments listed on the syllabus (below) for each day. At least 50 minutes of each Thursday's class will be devoted to discussion of the reading assigned for that day.

      The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259, or Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6441.


A student who is absent from a class or examination for the observance of a religious holiday may complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence, provided the student has notified the instructor in writing of the dates he or she will be absent.  Notification must be made two weeks prior to the absence or on the first class day if the absence will occur during the first two weeks of class.  In addition, the notification must be personally delivered to the instructor and signed and dated by the instructor, or sent certified mail with a return receipt request.  A student who fails to complete missed work within the time allowed will be subject to the normal academic penalties.

     Please note: Academic integrity is central to the mission of the university.  Each student is expected to turn in work completed independently, except when assignments specifically authorize collaborative effort.  It is not acceptable to use the words or ideas of another person without proper acknowledgement of that source.  This means that you must use footnotes and quotation marks to indicate the source of any phrases, sentences, paragraphs, or ideas found in published volumes, on the internet, or created by another student.  Please consult this website for more details:
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/history/about/academic-integrity.php

EXPECTATIONS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are requirements of the course.  Attendance will be taken during each class meeting, and students evaluated accordingly.

    Assignments include:

1.      One 4-5-page paper that analyzes a primary document in its socio-historical context.

2.      Two response papers, based on one week's discussion of the required readings, prepared by the small-group discussion leader for that week*

3.      Three-four discussion questions focused on the reading for each Thursday, turned into the small-group discussion leader for that week

4.      An in-class examination

5.      A final examination

*At the beginning of the term, students will be divided into small-discussion groups of five persons each.  During discussion-section meetings each Thursday, students will meet in their assigned groups to discuss questions on the readings.  Some of these questions will be prepared in advance by the instructor, others will come from the students.  Each week a different student will be responsible for leading discussion in his/her small group, and for preparing a report on that discussion to be submitted to the instructor.

Due dates:

Paper: October 1

In-class examination: October 27

Final examination: Monday, Dec. 14, 2-5 PM

Please note that the due date for the paper is listed so that you can schedule your time and plan accordingly.  Late papers will be penalized. Computer problems do not constitute a sufficient excuse for late papers. Please keep either an electronic file or a hard copy of any paper you turn in.

Student evaluation will be based on the following criteria:

Paper: 20 percent

Mid-term and final examinations: 30 percent each (total 60 percent)

Commitment to the course (class attendance, discussion-group response papers, weekly discussion questions, and participation): 20 percent

Students will be graded on a scale that includes pluses and minuses (A-, B+, etc.).

Week I
Aug. 27    INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE:  WHICH "SOUTH"?

Week II            
Sept. 1    THE CIVIL WAR AND ITS MEANINGS          

              "The Rise of the Klan," in Link and Wheelers, eds. (pp. 4-12)

Sept. 3    RECONSTRUCTION AND ITS ALTERNATIVES

              Parsons, "Midnight Rangers"

               Link and Wheeler, eds., Ch. 1

Week III
Sept. 8    THE PROMISE AND LIMITS OF BIRACIAL COALITIONS:  

                "The People's Party of America, Omaha Platform, 1892," in Link and Wheeler, eds., pp. 62-67    

Sept. 10  Link and Wheeler, eds., Ch. 3

               Goodwyn, "Populist Dreams and Negro Rights"

               Royster, ed., Southern Horrors, Introduction

Week IV
Sept. 15   ORIGINS OF AMERICAN APARTHEID

                 "The 'Atlanta Compromise'" in Link and Wheeler, eds., pp. 70-3          

Sept.  17   LYNCHING AND DISFRANCHISEMENT

                 Royster, ed. Southern Horrors (selections)

Recommended: Link and Wheeler, ed., Chapter 4

Week V
Sept. 22    IRONIES OF PROGRESSIVE REFORM, SOUTHERN STYLE

                  "Southern Arguments Against Suffrage" in Link and Wheeler, eds., pp. 121-4              

Sept. 24    PLESSY V. FERGUSON

                 Link and Wheeler, eds., 5, 6, 7

Week VI
Sept. 29  WORLD WAR I: FEDERAL MANDATES, LOCAL PREROGATIVES

Oct. 1 CROSS-CURRENTS OF THE 1920S I:  POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT

             Doyle, "Turning the Tide:  College Football and Southern Progressivism"

           Glasgow, "The Difference"

Paper Due (in class)

Week VII
Oct. 6   CROSS-CURRENTS OF THE 1920S II: SCOPES

             "The Making of the Mill Community" in Link and Wheeler, eds., pp. 105-10    

Oct. 8   Moran, ed., The Scopes Trial (selections)

Week VIII
Oct. 13   THE GREAT DEPRESSION IN THE SOUTH

               "The Appeal of the Communist Party" in Link and Wheeler, eds, pp. 168-80                  

Oct. 15   Lichtenstein, ed., Kester's Revolt Among the Sharecroppers (Intro)

Week IX
Oct. 20    HUEY LONG

                "Sharing the Wealth" in Link and Wheeler, eds, pp. 181-6

Oct. 22  Kester, Revolt Among the Sharecroppers

Week X
Oct. 27 IN-CLASS EXAMINATION

Oct. 29 WORLD WAR II AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE SOUTH

             Guglielmo, "Fighting for Caucasian Rights"

             Link and Wheeler, eds., Chapters 10, 11

Week XI
Nov. 3    CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENTS

               F. Mars, from Witness in Philadelphia, Link and Wheeler, eds., pp. 248-55              

Nov. 5   Gibson Robinson (finish)

Week XII
Nov. 10   THE SUNBELT AND ITS DISCONTENTS

                 "STOP ERA," Link and Wheeler, eds., pp. 299-301

Nov. 12   Link and Wheeler, eds., Chs. 13, 14

Week XIII
Nov. 17  POLITICAL REALIGNMENTS IN THE AGE OF REAGAN

               "Southern Conservatives fight the ERA" in Link and Wheeler, eds., pp. 296-301

Nov. 19  Link and Wheeler, eds., Ch. 15

               Falwell, "Listen, America!"

               Pastor, et al., In the Wake of the Storm," first half

Week  XIV
Nov. 24  HOW NATURAL ARE NATURAL DISASTERS?  KATRINA AND ITS AFTERMATH

              Pastor, et al., "In the Wake of the Storm," finish

Week XV  Dec. 1  CONCLUSIONS: DEMOGRAPHY AS A KEY TO THE FUTURE
Dec. 3    REVIEW FOR FINAL

Final Examination:  Monday, Dec. 14, 2-5 PM

34-3705M

Tobacco factory worker, 1922

VARIETIES OF SOUTHERN MUSIC 

Bluegrass                                              

Soul

Blues                                                     

Spirituals

Cajun                                                     

Square-dance

calling

Children's/play songs                           

Suburban Country

Country                                                 

Western Swing  

Field work songs                                   

Zydeco

Folk                                                      

Gospel                                                  

Honky-tonk

Hymns

Jazz

Minstrelsy

Musica Tejana (Tex-Mex)

Old English ballads

Prison work songs

Protest

Ragtime

Rock (southern)

Rockabilly

Sacred Harp

HIS 389 • Research In Research

40345 • Fall 2009
Meets W 200pm-500pm CBA 4.336
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This research course is designed for graduate students to conduct research and prepare a paper in their area of interest on broad questions of ethnicity/race, gender, class, sexuality, citizenship, and transnational identity in global context. More specifically, the course is designed for students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds to explore the ways in which national and transnational identities shape and are shaped by changing concepts of citizenship, patterns of global migration, postcolonialism, as well as race, class, and gender formations.  In the past students have chosen topics on identity formation in the U.S., Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Students prepare a 25-30 page research paper based on a topic of their choosing, preferably one related to their thesis or dissertation projects. Students will also write short response papers to introductory readings, prepare a short research-paper prospectus, and spend the middle weeks of the semester conducting research and meeting individually with the instructor. During the last three weeks students will present their paper drafts and receive feedback before handing in the final paper.  Grading: three short reader response papers/class participation (30%); short research paper proposal (10%); final paper (60%).

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

 

HIS 350L • Social Hist Of Confederacy-W

39162 • Spring 2009
Meets T 330pm-630pm PAR 8C
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

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