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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Brian P. Levack

Professor Ph.D., 1970, Yale University

Professor; John E. Green Regents Professor in History; Distinguished Teaching Professor
Brian P. Levack

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7204
  • Office: GAR 3.502
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: By appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Brian Levack grew up in a family of teachers in the New York metropolitan area. From his father, a professor of French history, he acquired a love for studying the past, and he knew from an early age that he too would become a historian. He received his B.A. from Fordham University in 1965 and his Ph.D. from Yale in 1970. In graduate school he became fascinated by the history of the law and the interaction between law and politics, interests that he has maintained throughout his career.

In 1969 he joined the History Department of the University of Texas at Austin, where he is now the John E. Green Regents Professor in History. The winner of several teaching awards, Levack offers a wide variety of courses on early modern British and European history, legal history, and the history of witchcraft. For eight years he served as the chair of his department. His books include The Civil Lawyers in England, 1603-1641:A Political Study (1973), The Formation of the British State: England, Scotland and the Union, 1603-1707 (1987); The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe (3rd edition, 2006), which has been translated into eight languages;  Witch-Hunting in Scotland: Law, Politics, and Religion  (2008); and The Devil Within: Possession and Exorcism in the Christian West (2013). He has also edited twenty books, including The Jacobean Union: Six Tracts of 1604 (1985); The Witchcraft Sourcebook (2004); and The Oxford Handbook of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America (2013).

 

Research interests

He is currently studying the development of trust in public institutions in early modern Britain and America.

 

Courses taught

Early modern Britain, the history of witchcraft, the history of political thought, and comparative legal systems.

 

Awards/Honors

Regents Outstanding Teaching Award, 2011; Academy of Distinguished Teachers, 2004; Scholar in Residence, Frances Lewis Law Center, Washington and Lee University School of Law, 1994; Raymond Dickson Teaching Fellowship, 1989; President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award, 1985; Liberal Arts Council Teaching Award, 1984; Guggenheim Fellowship, 1975-6


HIS 343P • The History Of Witchcraft

39845 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 201
(also listed as R S 357, WGS 345 )
show description

The main purpose of this lecture course is to explain the prosecution of more than 100,000 people, most of them women, for the crime of witchcraft in Europe and colonial America between 1450 and 1750. We shall study the formation and dissemination of both learned and popular witch beliefs from ancient times to the eighteenth century, the development of criminal procedures that facilitated the trial and conviction of accused witches, the religious motives for prosecuting witches during the age of the Reformation, and the social contexts within which accusations of witchcraft arose. The course will conclude with a discussion of the decline and end of witchcraft prosecutions and the revival of witchcraft practices in the twentieth century.

 

Reading:

Brian P. Levack, The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe

Daren Oldridge, The Witchcraft Reader

Norman Cohn, Europe’s Inner Demons

Norman Gaskill, Witchfinders

Paul Boyer and Stehen Nissenbaum, Salem Possessed

 

Assignments: Three exams (25% each) and one final essay or term paper (25%)

HIS 398T • Supervised Teaching In History

40310 • Spring 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 2.124
show description

Weekly group meetings with the instructor, individual consultations, and reports.

DEGREE PLAN STATEMENTS: Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

MEETING STATEMENT: Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

HIS 375K • Tudor England, 1485-1603

40050 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 3.112
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

This lecture course explores the most significant political, religious, social, economic and cultural developments in sixteenth-century England. The main themes of the course are the development of the modern state, the Protestant Reformation, the emergence of a capitalist society, and the growth of political and religious divisions during the reigns of Queen Mary I (1553-1558) and Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603). The lectures are topical and therefore do not follow a strict chronological order.

Required Reading:

 

Roger Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain, 1485-1714 (3rd ed., Longman)

Christopher Haigh, English Reformations  (Oxford)

Thomas More, Utopia, trans. & ed. R. Adams and George Logan (3nd ed.)           (Norton)

            Colin Martin and Geoffrey Parker, The Spanish Armada (rev. ed. Manchester)

 Examinations

There will be three 75-minute exams and a take-home final. The first 75-minute exam will be held on Thursday, September 26, and will cover the following material:

             Lectures 1-8

             Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain, chapters 1-4

             Haigh, English Reformations, pp. 1-167.

             Documents posted on Blackboard

 

The second 75-minute exam will be held on Tuesday, October 29, and will cover the following material:

             Lectures 9-16

             Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain, Chapter 6

   More, Utopia, and essays by Seebohm, Kautsky, Chambers, Hexter, Fox, and           Lewis

 

The third 75-minute exam will be held on Thursday, December 5 and will cover the following material:

             Lectures 17-25

             Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain, chapters 5, 7-10.

             Haigh, English Reformations, pp. 168-295.     

                                                    

            Martin and Parker, The Spanish Armada

          

Each of the first exams will consist of six or seven short essay questions, of which you must answer five (10 points each), and one longer essay question (50 points). The essay question will be selected from a set of three or four questions that will be distributed in advance. The grade for each of the 75-minute exams will count for roughly 25% of the course grade.

 

Final grades of B+ (85-89), C+ (75-79) and D+ (65-69) will be given in this course, but no minus grades will be given.

 

HIS 375L • Stuart England, 1603-1689

39740 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 3.134
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

This lecture course explores the most significant political, religious, social, economic and cultural developments in sixteenth-century England. The main themes of the course are the development of the modern state, the Protestant Reformation, the emergence of a capitalist society, and the growth of political and religious divisions during the reigns of Queen Mary I (1553-1558) and Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603). The lectures are topical and therefore do not follow a strict chronological order.

Texts:

Roger Locker, Tudor and Stuart Britain

Christopher Haigh, English Reformations

Thomas More, Utopia

Colin Martin and Geoffrey Parker, The Spanish Armada


Grading:

Three exams (75%) and a final essay (25%)

 

 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing

HIS 384K • Seminar In British History

39830 • Spring 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 1.122
show description

This seminar will study the period between the restoration of Charles II in 1660 and the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89. We will focus on four closely interrelated topics:

1) the revival of political tension in the aftermath of the Puritan Revolution and the climax of that tension in the Glorious Revolution;

2) the development of political theory, especially  that of John Locke and the radical Whigs, during the later years of Charles II’s reign;

3) the origin and development of religious dissent and the different ways in which the government responded to that dissent, ending with the Act of Toleration in 1689; and

4) the development of science and in particular the relationship between scientific thought on the one hand and both religious and political thought on the other. Students will be expected to read deeply in the primary and secondary sources of the period, participate actively in the discussions of the seminar and write a 20-page paper.

HIS 375K • Tudor England, 1485-1603

39615 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 201
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

Description: This lecture course explores the most significant political, religious, social, economic and cultural developments in seventeenth-century England. The unifying theme of the course is the problem of revolution, and the lectures investigate the causes, nature and development of the two revolutions of the seventeenth century--the Puritan Revolution of the 1640s and the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89. The lectures are topical and therefore do not follow a strict chronological order. All of the lectures are slide-illustrated.

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing

Reading:

R. Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain

C. Herrup, A House in Gross Disorder

 L. Stone, The Crisis of the Aristocracy

M. Gaskill, Witchfinders

B. Coward, Oliver Cromwell

J. Locke, Two Treatises of Government

W. Speck, Reluctant Revolutionaries

Assignments: Three exams (75%) and one final essay or term paper (25%)

HIS 387M • Demonology And Witchcraft

39730 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as R S 389R )
show description

This course will explore the beliefs of both educated and illiterate Europeans regarding the devil and his relationship with witches, who allegedly made pacts with him and worshipped him in large nocturnal assemblies in the fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will read a number of witchcraft treatises, including works by Heinrich Kramer (author the Malleus maleficarum), Henri Boguet, Nicolas Remy, Johann Weyer, William Perkins, James VI of Scotland, and Cotton Mather. We will also read some of the most important scholarly contributions to the study of this body of demonological literature. Students will be expected to participate in the weekly discussions of the seminar and write a 15-20-page paper on one of the demonological works written during this period. 

HIS 398T • Supervised Teaching In History

39790 • Spring 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 1.122
show description

Weekly group meetings with the instructor, individual consultations, and reports.

DEGREE PLAN STATEMENTS: Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

MEETING STATEMENT: Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

HIS 375K • Tudor England, 1485-1603

39575 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 201
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

Description: This lecture course explores the most significant political, religious, social, economic and cultural developments in seventeenth-century England. The unifying theme of the course is the problem of revolution, and the lectures investigate the causes, nature and development of the two revolutions of the seventeenth century--the Puritan Revolution of the 1640s and the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89. The lectures are topical and therefore do not follow a strict chronological order. All of the lectures are slide-illustrated.

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing

Reading:

R. Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain

C. Herrup, A House in Gross Disorder

 L. Stone, The Crisis of the Aristocracy

M. Gaskill, Witchfinders

B. Coward, Oliver Cromwell

J. Locke, Two Treatises of Government

W. Speck, Reluctant Revolutionaries

Assignments: Three exams (75%) and one final essay or term paper (25%)

HIS 375L • Stuart England, 1603-1689

39925 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WAG 201
show description

This lecture course explores the most significant political, religious, social, economic and cultural developments in sixteenth-century England. The main themes of the course are the development of the modern state, the Protestant Reformation, the emergence of a capitalist society, and the growth of political and religious divisions during the reigns of Queen Mary I (1553-1558) and Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603). The lectures are topical and therefore do not follow a strict chronological order.

Texts:

Roger Locker, Tudor and Stuart Britain

Christopher Haigh, English Reformations

Thomas More, Utopia

Colin Martin and Geoffrey Parker, The Spanish Armada


Grading:

Three exams (75%) and a final essay (25%)

 

 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing

HIS 398T • Supervised Teaching In History

40100 • Spring 2011
Meets W 400pm-700pm MEZ 2.124
show description

Weekly group meetings with the instructor, individual consultations, and reports.

DEGREE PLAN STATEMENTS: Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

MEETING STATEMENT: Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

HIS 375K • Tudor England, 1485-1603

39875 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm UTC 3.112
show description

HIS 375K (39875) Instructor: Brian Levack

UTC 3.112                                              TA: Merry Zide

TTH 11:00-12:30

TUDOR ENGLAND, 1485-1603

Required Reading:

Roger Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain, 1485-1714 (3rd ed, Longman)

Sir John Fortescue, On the Laws and Governance of England, ed. S. Lockwood (Cambridge)

            Christopher Haigh, English Reformations  (Oxford)

            Thomas More, Utopia, trans. & ed. R. Adams (2nd ed.) (Norton)

            Colin Martin and Geoffrey Parker, The Spanish Armada, (rev. ed. Norton)

Schedule of Lectures:

THE EARLY TUDORS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE MODERN STATE

1. The Battle of Bosworth Field (Jan. 19)

2. Henry VII and the Nobility (Jan. 21)

3. Law and Order (Jan. 26)

4. The Monarchy, Parliament and the Constitution (Jan. 28)

5. The Tudor Revolution in Government (Feb. 2)

THE REFORMATION

6. The English Church Before the Reformation (Feb. 4)

7. The Divorce (Feb. 9)

8. The Break from Rome (Feb. 11)

9. The Dissolution of the Monasteries (Feb. 16)

A CHANGING SOCIETY

10. Social Structure and Social Mobility  (Feb. 23)

11. Marriage, Sexuality and the Family  (February 25)

12. Agrarian Society and Enclosures (March 2)

13. The Peerage (March 4)

14. Humanism (March 9)

15. More’s Utopia (March 11)

16. Witchcraft I (March 23)

17. Witchcraft II (March 25)

18. Architecture (April 1)

THE REIGNS OF EDWARD VI, MARY I AND ELIZABETH I

19. The Mid-Tudor Crisis (Apr. 8)

20. Religion and Politics in the Reign of Mary (Apr. 13)

21. Queen Elizabeth I: A Portrait (Apr. 15)

22. Mary Queen of Scots (Apr. 20)

23. Elizabethan Puritanism (Apr. 22)

24. The Catholic Problem (Apr. 27)

25. The War with Spain 23. Elizabeth and Parliament (Apr. 29)

26. The Legacy of the Tudors (May. 4)

Examinations

There will be three exams, each lasting 90 minutes.  The first will be held on Thursday, February 18, and will cover the following material:

Lectures 1-9

Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain, chapters 1-4

Fortescue, On the Laws and Governance of England

Haigh, English Reformations, pp. 1-167.

The second exam will be held on Tuesday, April 6, and will cover the following material:

Lectures 10-18

Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain, Chapter 6

More, Utopia, and essays by Chambers, Hexter, Fox, Elliott, and Lewis 

The third exam will be held on Thursday, May 6, and will cover the following material:

Lectures 19-26

Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain, chapters 5, 7-10

Haigh, English Reformations, pp. 168-295.

  Martin and Parker, The Spanish Armada

Each of the exams will consist of six or seven short essay questions, of which you must answer five (10 points each), and one longer essay question (50 points). The essay question will be selected from a set of three or four questions that will be distributed in advance. The grade for each of the exams will count for roughly 25% of the course grade. Regularly scheduled make-up exams are not given in this course. Students who miss an examination and do not have a legitimate excuse (e.g., a note from a doctor) will receive a failing grade for that examination.  Students who have legitimate excuses should see the instructor to make alternative arrangements.

Final Essay or Paper

Each student is required to submit a final essay or term paper.  The essay will consist of an answer to a question that will be distributed about two weeks before the end of the semester. The purpose of the essay will be to develop your thoughts on one of the main problems with which the course is concerned.  In preparing your essay you will be expected to use the lectures and required readings, but you will be able to do so in any way you see fit.  You may also consult additional material, such as the recommended reading, but you will not be required to do so.  Instead of writing the final essay you may write a term paper on any aspect of Tudor history.  If you decide to write a paper (which should be approximately 10 pages in length), you must notify the instructor by April 8 and obtain his approval of a topic.  The grade you receive for the essay or the paper will count for roughly 25% of the course grade. Essays and papers are due on Saturday, May 15, at 5 p.m. in GAR 3.502. Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.

Office Hours:

Levack: <levack@mail.utexas.edu>: W 2:00-3:30, or by appointment in GAR 3.502  (475-7204)

Zide:  merryzide@gmail.com:

Recommended reading:

J. Guy, Tudor England (1991)

______, The Tudor Monarchy (1997)

J.R. Lander, Government and Community: England 1450-1509 (1980)

C. Ross, Richard III (1981)

P. Williams, The Tudor Regime (1989)

S.B. Chrimes, Henry VII (1972)

M. Bennett, The Battle of Bosworth (1985)

__________, Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke (1987)

G.R. Elton (ed.), The Tudor Constitution (1968)

J.J. Scarisbrick, Henry VIII (1968)

G.R. Elton, The Tudor Revolution in Government (1953)

G.R. Elton, Policy and Police (1978)

C. Coleman and D. Starkey (eds.) Revolution Reassessed (1986)

J.H. Baker, The Oxford History of the Laws of England, Vol. I: 1483-1558 (2003)

K.J. Kesselring, Mercy and Authority in he Tudor State (2003)

J. Guy, The Cardinal’s Court: the Impact of Thomas Wolsey in Star Chamber (1977)

D. Daniell, William Tyndale: A Biography (1994)

D. MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer: A Life (1996)

E. Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars (1992)

J.J. Scarisbrick, The Refornation and the English People (1984)

C. Haigh (ed.), The English Reformation Revised (1987)

R. Whiting, The Blind Devotion of the People (1989)

E. Shagan, Popular Politics and the English Reformation (2003)

S.E. Lehmberg, The Reformation of Cathedrals: Cathedrals in English Society, 1485-1603. 1988.

L. Solt, Church and State in Early Modern England (1990)

C.J. Sommerville, The Secularization of Early Modern England (1992)

A. Fox, Thomas More: History and Providence (1983)

R. Marius, Thomas More (1985)

G. Mattingly, Catherine of Aragon (1941)

E. Ives, Anne Boleyn (1986)

R. Warnicke, The Rise and Fall of Ann Boleyn (1989)

M. Aston, The King’s Bedpost: Reformation and Iconography in a Tudor Group Portrait (1993)

A. Fletcher, Tudor Rebellions (1968)

J. Cornwall, The Revolt of the Peasantry 1549

S. Anglo, Spectacle, Pageantry and Early Tudor Policy

_______, Images of Tudor Kingship (1992).

R. B. Outhwaite, Inflation in Tudor and Stuart England (1969)

A. Macfarlane, The Origins of English Individualism: The Family, Property and

Social Transition (1978).

E. Challis, The Tudor Coinage (1978)

J. Hatcher, Plague, Population and the English Economy, 1348-1530 (1977)

R. Porter, Disease, Medicine and Society in England, 1550-1860 (1987)

P. Slack. The Impact of the Plague in Tudor and Stuart England (1985)

A. Appleby, Famine in Tudor and Stuart England (1978)

R. H. Tawney, The Agrarian Problem in the Sixteenth Century (1971)

M. Overton, Agricultural Revolution in England: The Transformation of the Agrarian Economy 1500-1850 (1996)

J. Thirsk, (ed.). The Agrarian History of England and Wales IV: 1500-1640 (1967).

D. C. Coleman, The Economy of England, 1450-1750 (1977)

P. Ramsey (ed.), The Price Revolution in Sixteenth-Century England (1971)

W. G. Hoskins, The Age of Plunder (1976)

W. K.Jordan, Philanthropy in England, 1460-1660  (1959)

J. Pound, Poverty and Vagrancy in Tudor England (1971)

P. Slack, Poverty and Policy in Tudor and Stuart England (1988)

K. Wrightson, and D. Levine, Poverty and Piety in an English Village (1979)

J. Barry and C. Brooks (eds.), The Middling Sort of People: Culture, Society and Politics in England, 1550-1800 (1994)

I. W. Archer, The Pursuit of Stability: Social Relations in Elizabethan London (1991) 

D.H. Sacks, The Widening Gate: Bristol and the Atlantic Economy (1991)

R. Brenner, Merchants and Revolution: Commercial Change, Political Conflict, and London's Overseas Traders, 1550-1653 (1993).

J. Barry (ed.). The Tudor and Stuart Town, 1530-1688 (1990)

P. Clark, and P. Slack, English Towns in Transition, 1500-1700 (1976)

L. Pollock, Forgotten Children: Parent-Child Relations from 1500 to 1900 (1983)

L. Stone, The Family, Sex and Marriage in England, 1500-1800 (1977)

S. Amussen, An Ordered Society: Gender and Class in Early Modern England (1988)

L. Gowing, Domestic Dangers: Women, Words, and Sex in Early Modern London (1998)

A. Erickson, Women and Property in Early Modern England (1993)

A. Fletcher, Gender, Sex and Subordination in England, 1550-1800 (1995)

S. Mendelson and P. Crawford, Women in Early Modern England (1998)

J. Bennett, Ale, Beer and Brewsters in England (1999)

P. Crawford, Women and Religion in England 1500-1720 (1993)

B. J. Harris, English Aristocratic Women, 1450-1550 (2002)

K. Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic (1971)

J. Sharpe, Instruments of Darkness (1991)

B. Levack, The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe (1995)

D. Cressy, Agnes Bowker’s Cat: Travesties and Transgressions in Tudor and Stuart Englamd (2000)

K. Thomas, Man and the Natural World (1983)

R. Tittler and J. Loach, The Mid-Tudor Polity c. 1540-1560 (1980)

M. L Bush, The Government Policy of Protector Somerset (1975).

W. K Jordan,  Edward VI: The Young King (1968)

__________, Edward VI: The Threshold of Power (1970)

J. Loach, Parliament and the Crown in the Reign of Mary Tudor (1986).

R. Tittler, The Reign of Mary I  (1983).

D.M. Loades, The Reign of Mary Tudor (1991)

S. Frye, Elizabeth I: The Competition for Representation (1993).

S. Doran, Monarchy and Matrimony: The Courtships of Elizabeth I (1996).

J. Guy, The Reign of Elizabeth I: Court and Culture in the Last Decade (1995).

H. Hackett, Virgin Mother, Maiden Queen: Elizabeth I and the Cult of the Virgin Mary (1995)

C. Haigh (ed.), The Reign of Elizabeth I (1987).

L. Hopkins, Elizazbeth I and her Court (1990)

C. Levin, "The Heart and Stomach of a King": Elizabeth I and the Politics of Sex and Power (1994).

J.M. Walker, Dissing Elizabeth: Negative Representations of Gloriana (1998)

M. Levine, The Early Elizabethan Succession Question, 1558-1568 (1966)

D. Dean, Law-Making and Society in Late Elizabethan England: The Parliament of England, 1584-1601 (1996)

W. MacCaffrey, Elizabeth I: War and Politics, 1588-1603, 1992.

___________________. Queen Elizabeth and the Making of Policy, 1572-1588. Princeton, 1981.

___________________. The Shaping of the Elizabethan Regime (1968).

J. E. Neale, Elizabeth I (1934)

_________. The Elizabethan House of Commons (1949)

_________. Elizabeth I and her Parliaments. 2 vols. (1953, 1958)

F. Yates, Astraea: The Imperial Theme in the Sixteenth Century (1975).

L.B. Smith, Treason in Tudor England: Politics and Paranoia  (1986).

M.M. Knappen, Tudor Puritanism (1939)

P. Collinson, The Elizabethan Puritan Movement (1967)

J. Bossy, The English Catholic Community (1975)

R. Strong, The Cult of Elizabeth (1977)

C. Platt, The Great Rebuilding of Tudor and Stuart England (1994)

J. Summerson.  Architecture in Britain,1530 to 1830. 5th ed. (1969)

R. Tittler, Architecture and Power The Town Hall and the English Urban Community, c. 1500-1640 (1991).

N. Matar, Turks, Moors and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery (1999)

K. R. Andrews, Elizabethan Privateering (1964).

R. B. Wernham, Before the Armada: The Emergence of the English Nation, 1485-1588. (1966).

______________, After the Armada: Elizabethan England and the Struggle for Western Europe, 1588-1595  (1983).

G. Mattingly, The Armada (1959)

D. Howarth. The Voyage of the Armada: The Spanish Story (1981)

HIS 375L • Stuart England, 1603-1689

39315 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm PAR 1
show description

This lecture course explores the most significant political, religious, social, economic and cultural developments in sixteenth-century England. The main themes of the course are the development of the modern state, the Protestant Reformation, the emergence of a capitalist society, and the growth of political and religious divisions during the reigns of Queen Mary I (1553-1558) and Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603). The lectures are topical and therefore do not follow a strict chronological order.

Texts:

Roger Locker, Tudor and Stuart Britain

Christopher Haigh, English Reformations

Thomas More, Utopia

Colin Martin and Geoffrey Parker, The Spanish Armada


Grading:

Three exams (75%) and a final essay (25%)

 

 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing

Publications

Books Authored and Edited

Books authored: 

The Civil Lawyers in England, 1603-1641: A Political Study.
Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1973. 311 pp.

The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe. London: Longman, 1987, pp.  267; 2nd ed. 1995, 297 pp.; 3rd ed. 2006, 344 pp.

The Formation of the British State: England, Scotland and the Union, 1603-1707. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987, 1991. 260 pp.

Witchcraft and Magic in Europe:  The Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries  (with Marijke Gijswijt-Hofstra and Roy Porter). [The Athlone History of Witchcraft and Magic in Europe, vol. 5. Edited by Stuart Clark and Bengt Ankarloo.] London: Athlone Press and Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania  Press, 1999. Pp. 1-93.

The West: Encounters and Transformations 
(with Edward Muir, Michael Maas, and Meredith Veldman). New York: Pearson Longman, 2004. 2nd edition 2006. 3rd edition 2010.

Witch-Hunting in Scotland: Law, Politics and Religion.
London: Routledge, 2008. 217 pp.

Books edited:

The Jacobean Union: Six Tracts of 1604. Co-edited with Bruce Galloway. Edinburgh: Scottish History Society, 1985. lxxx + 268 pp.

Articles on Witchcraft, Magic and Demonology: A Twelve-Volume Anthology of Scholarly Articles. New York: Garland Press, 1992.

New Perspectives on Witchcraft, Magic and Demonology: A Six-Volume Anthology of Articles. New York: Routledge, 2001.
 
The Witchcraft Sourcebook. New York and London: Routledge, 2004. 348 pp.

 

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