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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Leonard N. Moore

Professor Ph.D., 1998, History, Ohio State University

Professor; Senior Associate Vice-President, Division of Diversity and Community Engagement
Leonard N. Moore

Contact

  • Phone: GAR 512-475-7254/ SSB 512-232-2913
  • Office: GAR 2.111/ SSB 4.118
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: F 10 a.m.-12 p.m. & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

Modern African American History; black urban history; intersection of race, sport, and hip-hop

Below are links to his books:
Black Rage in New Orleans: Police Brutality and African American Activism from World War II to Hurricane Katrina
Carl B. Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power

 

Courses taught

Intro to African American History; The Black Power Era; History of Black Nationalism; History of the Hip-Hop Generation

 

Awards/Honors

2004 National Urban League Whitney M. Young Award for Urban Leadership in Education
2002 NAACP Image Award Nominee for best non-fiction book

HIS 317L • Socl Entreprnrshp China/Us-Chn

38460 • Spring 2015
Meets
show description

This study-abroad course will look at the History of Social Entrepreneurship in the United States and China. Social Entrepreneurship is an emerging field in which passionate people driven by a desire to change the world lead, design, and launch business that solve social problems. However, starting a business to uplift a community is nothing new in the United States. In the African American community the history of black business is a history of social entrepreneurship. Black business ownership from the colonial era to the present has to some degree focused on solving problems that either the government was unwilling or unable to solve.

This course specifically looks at how innovative people have used a business approach to solve some of society’s greatest problems such as poverty, the lack of clean water, migrant education, caring for the aged, urban unemployment, health care, orphans, women’s rights, incarceration, and others. This course will explore the U.S. and China’s social entrepreneurial history and landscape, examine challenges in its current system, and look at the future of social entrepreneurship in the U.S. and China.

The course will examine these efforts within the context of 20th century U.S. and China history.

Social Entrepreneurship is rapidly expanding and growing phenomena as engaged-citizens realize that government is unable to solve some of society’s greatest problems. China represents arguably the best place to study this emerging field since it has failed to create structures to help low-income residents.

The course will be structured around four interconnected yet distinct elements:

1.         The history of social entrepreneurship in the U.S. and China

2.         The historic role of urban migration in the U.S. and China

3.         The systemic nature of urban inequality in the U.S. and China since World War II

4.         How social entrepreneurs in the U.S. and China have addressed these challenges

 

Texts:

Juliet Walker, The History of Black Business in America: Capitalism, Race, and Entrepreneurship

Toure Reed, Not Alms But Opportunity: The Urban League and the Politics of Racial Uplift

Jonathan Spence, Mao ZeDong: A Life

Michelle Loyalka, Eating Bitterness: Stories from the Front Line of China’s Greatest Urban Migration

Grading:

Grades will be based upon the following:

•           One take-home essay exam

•           Weekly blogging

•           An In-Class Presentation and Facilitation

•           12-14 Page Paper

•           Community Internship

•           Class participation

HIS 317L • The Black Power Movement

39455 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 106
(also listed as AFR 317D )
show description

The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

Texts:

Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)

Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam by Tate (weeks 3-5)

Die, Nigger, Die by H. Rap Brown (weeks 6-8)

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)

Carl Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power by Leonard Moore (weeks 12-14)

Under the Influence by Erin Patton (week 15)

 

Grading:

Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.

Exam 1: 25%

Exam 2: 25%

Exam 3: 25%

Group Project: 25%

HIS 317L • Urban Econ Development-Rsa

39730 • Spring 2014
Meets
show description

 

Course Description: This course will look at the history of urban economic development within the United States and South Africa, with a special focus on the growth, development, and neglect of low-income racially homogenous communities. Both countries share a racial past and both countries are still trying to find ways to bring its low-income residents into the economic mainstream. Within the United States inner-city communities are now becoming prime business locations because of its close access to downtown and the city’s financial and business markets. Further, emerging entrepreneurs are not only choosing to locate their firms in the ‘hood but they are also using local residents who were previously unemployed or underemployed. The goal of these efforts is to create jobs and income for inner-city residents, instead of relying upon charity and goodwill. A similar market-led approach is taking place in South Africa as well as entrepreneurs and developers are finding ways to bring economic development efforts to the countries notorious townships.  

 

While these efforts have only recently received widespread media attention, this course will show that the drive for vibrant communities is nothing new. Within the townships of South Africa there has been a sustained drive for economically competitive communities and likewise within inner-city America. This course will look at these efforts within the historical context of apartheid and the post colonial era within South Africa; and in the historical context of post-war and post-civil rights America.

 

Required Books:

Black Liberation: A Comparative History of Black Ideologies in the U.S. and South Africa, Fredrickson

After Mandela: The Struggle for Freedom in Post-Apartheid South Africa, Foster

American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland, Self

Khayelitsha: uMlungu in a Township, Otter

The Business of Black Power: Community Development, Capitalism, and Corporate Responsibility in Postwar America, Hill and Rabig

The New Urban Renewal: The Economic Transformation of Harlem and Bronzeville, Hyra

 

Service-Learning Component:

Every student will intern twice a week in the all-black township of Khayelitsha, the largest township in Capetown. The goals for economic development firms working within Khayelitsha are to:

 

  • create jobs and new employment opportunities
  • increase income levels that enable people to pay for services
  • broaden the tax and revenue base of the township
  • concentrate on human resource potential and opportunity development
  • build new institutions for sustainable economic development
  • promote skills between developed and underdeveloped areas

 

Naomi Classen, the IES Abroad director in Capetown, has a structure in place so that students will gain valuable experience in a hands-on environment. Students will not be simple observers, but rather active participants as they grapple with the critical issues of urban economic development. Organizations like the Khayelitsha Community Trust, the Khayelitsha Youth Development Council, and the countless NGOs in the township will give students an opportunity to learn about the possibilities of working in low-income communities.

 

Most recently, the Khayelitsha Community Trust has brought together key figures in government, banking, civil service, and local community based organizations in an effort to make Khayelitsha a top-flight suburb by 2020. There are several organizations with the Trust that are involved in economic development efforts within Khayelitsha:

 

  • Khayelitsha CBD—a mixed use development on 75 acres
  • Swartklip—a business, industrial, and residential area
  • Washington Square—retail development
  • Site C Node—business node with transportation interchange
  • New Way/Look Out Hill-gateway tourism node and retail center
  • Monwabisi Resort—golf course, commercial and retail
  • Greenpoint Commercial Center—gas station

 

Students will be responsible for creating an oral history project of these firms. This will involve students interviewing key staff, constituents, stakeholders, and clients of the firm. Students will then write a history of the organization which will be deposited within the firm’s archives.

 

Course Outline

June 1: Welcome Dinner

June 2: Race in the U.S. and South Africa

June 3: Post-War America and Making the Second Ghetto

June 4: Apartheid and the Roots of Ghetto Formation in South Africa

June 5: Spokesman of the Ghetto: Malcolm X and Steven Biko

June 6: Watts and Soweto

June 7: Field Trip

June 8: Field Trip

June 9: The Business of Black Power

June 10: Race, Housing, and Segregation: Chicago

June 11: Urban Schooling and Educational Malpractice: New York

June 12: Public Health and the Racial Politics of Health Care: Memphis

June 13: Unemployment, Underemployment, and the Non-Existence of Jobs: Cleveland

June 14: Field Trip

June 15: Field Trip

June 16: The Racial Politics of Public Transportation: Atlanta

June 17: The Promise and Peril of Black Political Power: Philadelphia

June 18: The Politics of Urban Renewal and Displacement: The Bronx

June 19: Intra-Racial Class Conflict: Cleveland

June 20: Rebuilding the Inner-City: Community Development Institutions

June 21: Field Trip

June 22: Field Trip

June 23: The Role of Anchor Institutions: New Orleans

June 24: The Cluster-Led Approach: Pittsburgh

June 25: Barriers to Capital: Detroit

June 26: Enterprise and Empowerment Zones: South Central Los Angelese

June 27: The Olympics, The World Cup, and Economic Development: Atlanta and Capetown

June 28: Green Economic Development and Green-Collar Jobs: Oakland

June 29:Globalization and The Future of the Inner-City: East Austin

June 30: Presentations and Closing Dinner

 

 

Grades

Grades will be based upon the following:

  • Two critical book reviews
  • Weekly blogging
  • Two exams
  • Oral History Project
  • A fifteen page historical paper that compares and contrasts inner-city economic development efforts in the United States with similar efforts in Khayelitsha. Your oral history project should form the basis for the South African portion of the paper.
  • Internship
  • Class participation

 

Grade Breakdown

  • Two critical book reviews (20%)
  • Weekly Blogging (10%)
  • Internship (10%)
  • Class Participation (10%)
  • Mid-Term exam (20%)
  • Oral history Project and Final Paper (30%)

 

 Daily Class Schedule

  • 9:00-11:00    Lecture/Case Studies
  • 11:15-12:15  Global Workforce (twice a week)
  • 12:30-4:30    Internship (twice a week)

HIS 317L • The Black Power Movement

39675 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 106
(also listed as AFR 317D )
show description

The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

 

Texts:

Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)

Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam by Tate (weeks 3-5)

Die, Nigger, Die by H. Rap Brown (weeks 6-8)

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)

Carl Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power by Leonard Moore (weeks 12-14)

Under the Influence by Erin Patton (week 15)

 

Grading:

Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.

Exam 1: 25%

Exam 2: 25%

Exam 3: 25%

Group Project: 25%

HIS 317L • Socl Entreprnrshp China/Us-Chn

39375 • Spring 2013
Meets
show description

This study-abroad course will look at social entrepreneurship in the United States and China. In particular, this course will look at how racial minorities in the United States since 1945 and migrants within China since the 1980s have developed strategies and approaches to approve the quality of life in their respective communities. Social entrepreneurship is an emerging field in which passionate people driven by a desire to change the world lead, design, and launch businesses that solve social problems. Because the field of social entrepreneurship is interdisciplinary and in its infancy, the course will be introductory in nature and will draw heavily from case studies, student inquiry, speaker experience, and the students’ own volunteer experiences in Beijing. This course specifically looks at how innovative people in the U.S. and China historically have used business approaches to address some of society’s greatest problems such as poverty, environmental concerns, migrant education, caring for an aging population, urban unemployment, health care, orphan child welfare, women’s rights, fatherless homes, and other issues.

 

Considerable attention will be given to the 1960s, when African and Mexican Americans launched a ton of non-profit businesses in hopes of solving problems in their communities. We will look at these initiatives from the 1960s, and compare and contrast that with solutions offered from China’s migrant population. This course will explore the United States and China’s social entrepreneurial landscapes, examine challenges in their current systems, and look at the similarities and differences between the U.S. and China’s approaches to social entrepreneurship as viable ways of solving social problems. Further study and examination will address any common problems experienced globally.

 

Social Entrepreneurship is a rapidly expanding and growing phenomenon as engaged citizens realize that government is unable to solve some of society’s greatest problems. China represents arguably the best place to study this emerging field since its declining welfare state has struggled to provide sufficient and innovative solutions to growing social problems.  Placing China’s social enterprise efforts into a broader context of similarities to and differences from the U.S. will give students a unique comparative perspective.

 

The course will be structured around four interconnected yet distinct elements:

  1. The field of social entrepreneurship/enterprise
  2. Types of challenges in the U.S. and China
  3. The realities of starting and managing a social enterprise venture
  4. How social entrepreneurs in the U.S. and China are addressing these challenges and to what extent this impacts U.S. and China relations

 

Students who enroll in the course will learn and explore:

  1. Chinese traditions and culture, as well as contemporary history and current socio-political systems.
  2. A good working definition of social entrepreneurship/enterprise
  3. The most pressing social issues facing the U.S. and China
  4. How the U.S. and China are attempting to deal with these issues
  5. What is a non-profit, an “agency” or NGO and how do these differ from social enterprises?
  6. Problems facing social entrepreneurs in the U.S. and China
  7. Similarities and differences in the approaches to social entrepreneurship in the United States than in China
  8. Whether or not current social entrepreneurship models from the United States will work in China
  9. The impact of Chinese culture and politics on social entrepreneurship

10. The advantages and/or disadvantages of being an American social entrepreneur in China

11. It is possible to measure social impact, and if so, how do we effectively measure it?

12. How social enterprise firms sustain themselves

13. How to write a proposal for a social enterprise venture

 

Partnership with the Dandelion School

One critical component of the course is the 10-hour per week internship at the Dandelion School in Beijing. Founded in 2005 as the only middle-school in Beijing catering to the needs of the city’s large and expanding migrant population, the Dandelion School is an innovative model of education whose goal is to increase educational attainment within this population. Students will serve as teaching assistants, English instructors, staff support members, and in other capacities. By working at the Dandelion School students will gain first-hand knowledge of how one venture is attempting to solve one of China’s greatest social problems, migrant education.

 

Chinese Language and Culture Component

To help our students understand the culture, history, and politics of China, Dr. Ge Chen, Assistant Vice President and Director of federally-funded TRiO Programs at UT, will teach a 1-hour class on Chinese Language and Culture in the spring of 2013. Born and raised in China and fluent in Mandarin, Dr. Chen adds essential cultural and historical knowledge to this program.  She will also teach the daily Chinese Language and Culture class while we are in China for the Maymester.

 

Required Books

  • Paul Tough, Whatever it Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America
  • Jacqueline Novogratz, The Blue Sweater: Bridging the Gap Between Rich and Poor in an Interconnected World
  • Wilford Welch, Tactics of Hope: How Social Entrepreneurs are Changing Our World
  • Muhammad Yunus, Banker to the Poor: Microlending and the Battle Against World Poverty
  • Mykoskie, Blake, Start Something That Matters

 

Grades

Grades will be based upon the following:

  • 30% Two take-home essay exams
  • 10% A daily journal
  • 25% Group project:  a social enterprise venture proposal for a new venture or a new innovation within an existing venture to address a social problem in the U.S. and/or China which consists of (1) a five-page proposal; (2) two-minute video; (3) 90-second podcast
  • 25% Research Paper
  • 10% Volunteering at a local social enterprise organization

 

Research Paper

Each student will be required to write a 12-15 page paper on a particular social issue within the United States in the 1960s and how innovative firms attacked the problem. For instance, in Cleveland, Ohio, the Hough Area Development Corporation was founded in 1967 to combat the issue of urban poverty and unemployment. Further, in postwar Pittsburgh, William Strickland launched the Manchester-Bidwell Corporation in an effort to meet the needs of inner-city kids who were passionate about the arts. Additionally, the Black Panther Party created a host of “Community Survival Programs” in the 1960s designed to attack problems. Last, in 1965 Jim Brown and other African American professional athletes created the Negro Industrial and Economic Union in an effort to trigger black entrepreneurship in America’s inner-cities.

 

Topics must be approved by the Instructor and the research must include primary sources such as newspapers, personal papers, archives, magazine articles, TV commercials, radio programs, etc.

 

 

Social Enterprise Venture Proposal (Passion and Purpose)

The bulk of the grade comes from the social enterprise venture proposal that students will collaborate on with 3-4 other team members. These high-performance, inter-disciplinary teams will focus on a particular challenge in the U.S. and/or China that they are passionate about. Ideally, teams will include students from different academic backgrounds. For example, students in the liberal arts and humanities are often motivated by passion, contribution, and impact, whereas students in the college of business often think in terms of expertise, metrics, and capital. Research suggests that effective social enterprise firms have a mixture of people with different skill sets. Students will work on a compelling business plan that addresses a well-defined social challenge. The project will consist of a business plan, a two-minute video, and a 90-second podcast. At the end of the Maymester, each team will pitch their social enterprise idea to a group of American and Chinese professionals.

 

At the beginning of every class, each team will choose a representative to give an update to the class. This includes a 40-second elevator pitch, and updates, changes, interventions, and next steps, as it relates to the venture proposal.

 

This project will help students strengthen their teamwork, problem solving, and presentation skills, and it will also deepen their understanding of social innovation and entrepreneurial leadership.  Specific attention will focus on delivering a compelling message on what matters most to the student and how he/she can blend passion with an innovative professional career devoted to making a change in the world in which they live.

 

Volunteering

A major component of the course is the 10-hour per week volunteering assignment at a local social enterprise organization. Students will volunteer in groups with various community partners and we will collaborate with that partner to identify needs and solutions through innovative problem solving.

 

Daily Class Schedule

Chinese Language and Culture                                           8:30-9:30

Social Entrepreneurship in the U.S. and China                 9:30-11:30

Volunteering                                                                          afternoons

 

Maymester Schedule*

Saturday        May 25           Arrive in Beijing

Sunday           May 26           Welcome/Orientation and Group Dinner

Monday          May 27           China’s Challenges, Part 1

Tuesday         May 28           China’s Challenges, Part 2

Wednesday    May 29           Field Trip/Excursion

Thursday       May 30           Introduction to the Entrepreneurial Mindset

Friday                         May 31           Entrepreneurship and Social Value

Saturday        June 1             Open

Sunday           June 2             Open

Monday          June 3             Passion and Purpose

Tuesday         June 4             Profit and Metrics

Wednesday    June 5             Field Trip/Excursion

Thursday       June 6             Identifying Social Problems

Friday                         June 7             Providing Innovative Solutions

Saturday        June 8             Open

Sunday           June 9             Open

Monday          June 10          Sustainability

Tuesday         June 11          How to Measure Social Impact

Wednesday    June 12          Field Trip/Excursion

Thursday       June 13          Scaling for Impact

Friday                         June 14          Research Day

Saturday        June 15          Open

Sunday           June 16          Open

Monday          June 17          The Elevator Pitch

Tuesday         June 18          Leadership and Challenges of Social Entrepreneurs

Wednesday    June 19          Venture Proposal Presentations

Thursday       June 20          Venture Proposal Presentations

Friday             June 21          Farewell Dinner

Saturday        June 22          Depart to U.S.

*Class schedule and field trips/excursions subject to change.   

HIS 317L • The Black Power Movement

39215 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 106
(also listed as AFR 317D )
show description

The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

Required Books

Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)

The Autobiography of Malcolm X (weeks 3-5)

Black Power (weeks 6-8)

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)

Black Theology and Black Power (weeks 11-13)

Do I Dare Disturb the Universe (Weeks 14-15)

 

Grading

Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.

Exam 1: 30%

Exam 2: 30%

Exam 3: 35%

Engage Austin Service Project: 5%

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history.

HIS F317L • Inner City In Postwar Amer-Ssp

85488 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am CBA 4.328
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

HIS 317L • Black Power Movement

39175 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 106
(also listed as AFR 317D )
show description

The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

Required Books

Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)

Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam by Tate (weeks 3-5)

Die, Nigger, Die by H. Rap Brown (weeks 6-8)

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)

Carl Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power by Leonard Moore (weeks 12-14)

Under the Influence by Erin Patton (week 15)

Grading

Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.

Exam 1: 25%

Exam 2: 25%

Exam 3: 25%

Group Project: 25%

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

HIS F317L • Inner City In Postwar Amer-Ssp

85467 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am GAR 1.126
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

HIS 317L • Black Power Movement

39110 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WEL 1.308
(also listed as AFR 317D )
show description

The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

Grading

Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.
Exam 1: 25%
Exam 2: 25%
Exam 3: 25%
Group Project: 25%

Texts

Required Books
Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)
Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam by Tate (weeks 3-5)

Die, Nigger, Die by H. Rap Brown (weeks 6-8)

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)
Carl Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power by Leonard Moore (weeks 12-14)

Under the Influence by Erin Patton (week 15)

HIS 317L • Inner City In Postwar Amer-Ssp

84972 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am GAR 3.116
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

HIS 365G • Afr Amer Male In Postwar Amer

39848 • Spring 2010
Meets M 600pm-900pm BEN 1.104
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 392 • The Black Power Movement

40030 • Spring 2010
Meets M 900-1200 GAR 1.122
show description

Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 317L • Black Power Movement

39790 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm WEL 1.308
(also listed as AFR 317D )
show description
   
                                                           Black Power Movement
                                                             AFR 317/HIS317
                                                                   Fall 2009
                                                           T/TH: 11:00-12:30
    


Dr. Leonard N. Moore                                                                             Garrison Hall 1.118
        
Course Description and Objectives
The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

Required Books
Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)
    Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam by Tate (weeks 3-5)
    Die, Nigger, Die by H. Rap Brown (weeks 6-8)
    Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)
    Carl Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power by Leonard Moore (weeks 12-14)
    Under the Influence by Erin Patton (week 15)
    
Course Requirements
1. Attendance, preparation, and participation are essential. Prepare for class by reading the assigned text and participate in class discussions.
2. Your grade will be based on three exams and a group project.
3. Your group project requires you to produce a 10-page funding proposal for a community-based program that seeks to elevate the quality of life for low-income African Americans. Modeled after the Black Panther Party’s Community Survival Programs, this proposal will directly address many of the issues in East Austin. In addition to the 10-page proposal, your group is also required to produce a 5 minute documentary and a 3-minute podcast on your topic. Much more information regarding the group project will be forthcoming.

Course Grading
Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.
Exam 1: 25%
Exam 2: 25%
Exam 3: 25%
Group Project: 25%
 

Schedule  
Week 1:    The 2nd Great Migration and the Foundations of Black Power                    
                Ghanaian Independence and the Global Dimensions of Black Power
Week 2:    Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power       
                 Mae Mallory, Urbanization, and Internationalism               
Week 3:     Elijah Muhammad and the theology of the Nation of Islam
                 The Nation of Islam and the Emergence of Malcolm                   
Week 4:    The Ideology and Philosophy of Malcolm                            
                From Malcolm X to El Hajj Malik El-Shabazz
Week 5:    Max Stanford and the Birth of RAM                               
                The Watts Riots and Death of the Civil Rights Movement
Week 6:    Lowndes County                                       
                Oakland and The Birth of the Black Panthers
Week 7:     The Black Panther Party and State Repression                       
                 The Survival Programs of the Black Panther Party
Week 8:    US and the Development of Cultural Nationalism                       
                Amiri Baraka, Newark, and the Black Arts Movement
Week 9:    School Boycotts, Protests, and the Fight for Community Control                
                High School Students and the Black Power Movement
Week 10:   The Rise of Black Political Power                                
                 The 1972 Black National Political Convention
Week 11:    Black Power on Campus                                   
                The Development of Black Studies as an Academic Discipline
Week 12:     Albert Cleage and Black Christian Nationalism                       
                 Black Power and the Black Church
Week 13:    Black Capitalism and the Strive for Economic Empowerment          
                Rabbi David Hall and the McDonald’s Boycott   
Week 14:    Ali, The Black Power Movement and the Black Athlete                   
                 The 1968 Olympic Boycott
Week 15:     From Black Power to Pimp Juice                               
                  Conclusion

 

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