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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Mark Metzler

Professor Ph.D., 1998, University of California, Berkeley

Professor of History and Asian Studies
Mark Metzler

Contact

Biography

Research interests

Modern Japanese History; Global History; Historical Political Economy.

My newest book is entitled Capital as Will and Imagination: Schumpeter's Guide to the Postwar Japanese Miracle (Cornell University Press, 2013). My subject is the nature of modern capital creation, with Japan's experience serving as a case study.  Asian-style high-speed growth, pioneered in Japan in the 1950s, represents capitalist industrial development in its most intensified form. To understand this process, I turn to a neglected side of Joseph Schumpeter's theory of economic development: the nexus of money creation by banks, investment, and inflation. The shadow of credit is debt, and the worldwide debt bubbles of recent times reveal the limits of the twentieth-century growth model. 

My earlier book, Lever of Empire: The International Gold Standard and the Crisis of Liberalism in Prewar Japan (University of California Press, 2006), examined how finance-driven policies led central bankers and government officials deliberately to induce a series of economic depressions in early twentieth-century Japan. These culminated in the depression of 1929-1931; the fascist reaction that followed destroyed the prewar liberal system.

These studies are part of a larger research program aimed at grasping the history of Japan in the "long duration" of centuries and in its wider East Asian and global contexts.

Education

PhD in History (East Asia/Japan), University of California, Berkeley; MA in Comparative Social History, University of California, Santa Cruz; BA in International Relations, Stanford University. Additional coursework at Osaka City University, Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies, Yokohama, Beijing Language Institute, and the Freie Universitat Berlin.

Courses taught

History of globalization, Japanese history (early modern through postwar), the political economy of Japan, capitalism and global history, empire and globalization in East Asia.

Affiliations

Kyoto University, Institute for Research in the Humanities, 2010–12. University of Tokyo, Institute of Social Science, 2003-04.


HIS 342C • Postwar Japan

39555 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 800am-930am UTC 3.112
(also listed as ANS 341N )
show description

This course begins by examining the transition from war, defeat, and military occupation to the economic miracle of the 1960s.  Japan’s high-speed industrial growth established the model for a new kind of accelerated development that has since unfolded across Asia.  These political and economic transformations were also social and personal, encompassing the remaking of family structures and ideologies.  The greatest lessons may lie in the aftermath of high-speed growth, in the transformations that accompanied the deflation of the economic bubble after 1990.  The semester concludes with a consideration of present trajectories and possible futures.

 

Texts:

1. Andrew GORDON, A Modern History of Japan, third edition (Oxford University Press, 2013).
2. John W. DOWER, Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Aftermath of World War II (W.W. Norton/New Press, 1999).
3. R. Taggart MURPHY, The Weight of the Yen (W. W. Norton, 1997).
4. Handouts, online, and electronic reserve readings as specified over the course of the semester

 

 

Grading:

• two midterm exams (worth 20% each)
• two essays on class readings (15% each)
• final exam including take-home essays (25%)
• active class participation (5%)

 

HIS 350L • East/West: Spirit/Intel Encoun

39600 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 1100am-200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as ANS 372 )
show description

This upper-division seminar provides a forum for exploring some spiritual and intellectual encounters of “East” and “West,” with a focus on ideas of mind, spirit, and consciousness. “East” and “West” are relative and relational terms, directions rather than places. They are relative, mutual, and shape-shifting. As metaphors they are generative and multivalent; when one starts to look, one finds many Easts and Wests at play, as various as the “Oriental philosophy” of Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Xuanzang’s “journey to the West” to discover the Heart Sutra, and the Zen journeys of the West Coast beatniks. In this exploration of comparisons and connections, we will encounter a full house of canonical figures including Zhuangzi, Zhu Xi, Avicenna, Ibn ‘Arabi, Hume, Swedenborg, Blake, Nietzsche, Tagore, and Jung, along with some brilliant but less well known thinkers. We will spend much of our time in the open spaces between civilizational control systems. Many of the texts are dense and difficult, reflections of deep and often distant traditions. They need to be read slowly and with care. They also repay sincere inquiry with new vistas and unexpected bounties.

Texts:

Readings include Joanna Macy, Mutual Causality in Buddhism and General Systems Theory; Jonathan Spence, The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci; and many online readings TBA.

Grading:

1. Participation in class discussion:  one overall grade, worth 20% of the course grade.

2. Eight papers of 1.5 pages each on weekly readings (altogether, 40% of the course grade).

3. Midterm essay (20% of course grade).

4. Final essay (partial revision of midterm essay; 20%).

HIS 341K • Origins Of Modern Japan

39835 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 4.112
(also listed as ANS 341K )
show description

Same as Asian Studies 341K. This course examines Japan’s early modern age, from the end of the warring-states period in the 1500s to the stirrings of the industrial revolution in the mid 1800s.  The main focus is on the period of government by the Tokugawa shoguns (1600–1867), the final era of samurai rule.  Topics include social and economic change, national isolation and national opening, the Meiji revolution, and the origins of modern nationalism, imperialism, and democracy.   We pay special attention to the subjective experiences of Japanese men and women who lived and created Japan’s distinctive path to modernity.

Global Cultures flag.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Texts:

Conrad Totman, Early Modern Japan, University of California Press, 1993.

Katsu Kokichi, Musui’s Story: The Autobiography of a Tokugawa Samurai, trans. Teruko Craig, University of Arizona Press, 1991.

Yamakawa Kikue, Women of the Mito Domain, trans. Kate Wildman Nakai, Stanford University Press, 2001.

And other readings TBA.

 Course requirements:•   two midterm exams (worth 20% each)

•   two essays on class readings (15% each)

•   final exam (20%)

•   active class participation (10%). Attendance is required.

HIS 381 • Capitalism & Global History

40185 • Spring 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 1.122
show description

How can we represent social change in ways that recenter nation-bound narratives and transcend the limitations of parochial historiographies?  How can we connect our research to the concerns of other scholarly disciplines and address multicultural international publics?  This seminar provides a forum for approaching these challenges.  It explores attempts by historians and social scientists, both classic and very recent, to conceptualize global history and the history of capitalism.  It likewise explores their persistent difficulties, such as Eurocentrism, narcissistic teleologies, and premature totalization of partial conclusions.  The goal is to give seminar members a place to apply transnational and global approaches to their own research agendas.The moment is opportune for historians.  As a field of research, transnational history, grounded in specific regional and thematic expertise, is the growth edge of the discipline.  University faculties increasingly seek fellow scholars who can offer credible research and teaching approaches to global history and global studies.A premise of this course is that contemporary forms of globalization represent the latest phase in a far longer process, which can be traced to the twelfth century and earlier.  Among the debates we will engage are those over the emergence and nature of capitalism, the economic divergence between Europe and Asia, the transatlantic slave trade, the Industrial Revolution, consumer society and family structure, economic development and underdevelopment, imperialism, global crises and depressions, the rise of Fordism, and the shift from Fordism to neo-liberal globalization.  This seminar will serve also as a workshop for ideas related to the 2014–15 program of UT’s Institute for Historical Studies, on “Capital and Commodities”:http://www.utexas.edu/cola/insts/historicalstudies/theme/overview.php

Readings will include:

• Giovanni Arrighi, The Long Twentieth Century

• Fernand Braudel, Capitalism and Civilization (selections)

• Robert Brenner, The Economics of Global Turbulence

• Kenneth Pomeranz, The Great Divergence

• Jan de Vries, The Industrious Revolution

• Eric Williams, Capitalism and Slavery

In addition to works of postwar historiography, we will also investigate classic writings on capitalism by Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Max Weber, and others.

We invite interested participants to email us before the start of the semester to introduce your specific research interests:mmetzler@utexas.edu<mailto:mmetzler@utexas.edu> and jmvaughn@austin.utexas.edu<mailto:jmvaughn@austin.utexas.edu>

HIS 342C • Postwar Japan

39775 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 4.110
(also listed as ANS 341N )
show description

This course begins by examining the transition from war, defeat, and military occupation to the economic miracle of the 1960s.  Japan’s high-speed industrial growth established the model for a new kind of accelerated development that has since unfolded across Asia.  These political and economic transformations were also social and personal, encompassing the remaking of family structures and ideologies.  The greatest lessons may lie in the aftermath of high-speed growth, in the transformations that accompanied the deflation of the economic bubble after 1990.  The semester concludes with a consideration of present trajectories and possible futures.

 Texts:

1. Andrew GORDON, A Modern History of Japan, third edition (Oxford University Press, 2013).

2. John W. DOWER, Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Aftermath of World War II (W.W. Norton/New Press, 1999).

3. R. Taggart MURPHY, The Weight of the Yen (W. W. Norton, 1997).

4. OCHIAI Emiko, The Japanese Family System in Transition (Tokyo: LTCB International Library Foundation, 1996).

5. Simon PARTNER, Toshié: A Story of Village Life in Twentieth-Century Japan (University of California Press, 2004).

6. Handouts, online, and electronic reserve readings as specified over the course of the semester

 Grading:

• two midterm exams (worth 20% each)

• two essays on class readings (15% each)

• final exam including take-home essays (25%)

• active class participation (5%)

HIS 350L • East/West: Spirit/Intel Encoun

39810 • Fall 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 0.120
(also listed as ANS 372 )
show description

This upper-division seminar provides a forum for exploring some spiritual and intellectual encounters of “East” and “West,” with a focus on ideas of mind, spirit, and consciousness. “East” and “West” are relative and relational terms, directions rather than places. They are relative, mutual, and shape-shifting. As metaphors they are generative and multivalent; when one starts to look, one finds many Easts and Wests at play, as various as the “Oriental philosophy” of Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Xuanzang’s “journey to the West” to discover the Heart Sutra, and the Zen journeys of the West Coast beatniks. In this exploration of comparisons and connections, we will encounter a full house of canonical figures including Zhuangzi, Zhu Xi, Avicenna, Ibn ‘Arabi, Hume, Swedenborg, Blake, Nietzsche, Tagore, and Jung, along with some brilliant but less well known thinkers. We will spend much of our time in the open spaces between civilizational control systems. Many of the texts are dense and difficult, reflections of deep and often distant traditions. They need to be read slowly and with care. They also repay sincere inquiry with new vistas and unexpected bounties.

 

Texts:

Readings include Joanna Macy, Mutual Causality in Buddhism and General Systems Theory; Jonathan Spence, The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci; and many online readings TBA.

Grading:

1. Participation in class discussion:  one overall grade, worth 20% of the course grade.

2. Eight papers of 1.5 pages each on weekly readings (altogether, 40% of the course grade).

3. Midterm essay (20% of course grade).

4. Final essay (partial revision of midterm essay; 20%).

HIS 306N • Modern World

39271 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.128
show description

Themes in the history of the planet over the past half millennium. We will concentrate on the movements of people and ideas, technology, economy, and institutions that have made possible our interconnected world.  We devote substantial time to the concepts and methodologies of global history as well as to the content of empirical historical developments. 

 

Grading

Two midterm exams: 20% each

Final Exam: 25%

Essay: 15%

Quizzes and Participation: 20%

 

Texts

Robert Tignor, and others, Worlds Together, Worlds Apart (W.W. Norton). [Feel free to use any edition that includes Chapters 10–21 (years 1000 to 2000).]

 

And other texts TBA.

HIS 381 • History Of Globalization

39775 • Spring 2013
Meets W 1200pm-300pm GAR 0.120
show description

How can we represent social change in ways that recenter nation-bound narratives and transcend the limitations of parochial historiographies?  How can we connect the results of our research to the concerns of other scholarly disciplines and address multicultural international publics?  This seminar provides a forum for approaching these challenges.  It explores attempts, both classic and very recent, to conceptualize global history and the processes now known as globalization.  It likewise explores their persistent difficulties, such as Eurocentrism, narcissistic teleologies, and premature totalization of partial conclusions.  The goal is to give seminar members a place to apply transnational and global approaches to their own research agendas.  We also consider the work of several UT historians on the subject.

The moment is opportune for historians.  As a field of research, transnational history, grounded in specific regional and thematic expertise, is the growth edge of the discipline.  University faculties increasingly seek fellow scholars who can offer credible research and teaching approaches to global history and global studies.

This seminar mixes studies of method, context, and case studies, adapted to mesh with participants’ interests.  I invite interested participants to email me before the start of the semester at mmetzler@mail.utexas.edu, to introduce your specific research interests.

May be taken as either a reading or a research seminar.

Topics and texts.  Among the topics and texts to be discussed in one or more weeks are:

• Spaces of flows; technological revolutions; approaches to global history.  Texts: selections from Manuel Castells’ Information Age trilogy + TBA.

• Pretensions of global governance; the crises of the 1980s and 1990s in Latin America, Africa, and Eurasia in historical context.  Texts: Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents + TBA

• Globalization boom in the late 19th-century? Globalization holocaust? Texts: Mike Davis, Late Victorian Holocausts + TBA.

• Early modern globalization: a Eurocentric process?  Texts: Janet Abu-Lughod, Before European Hegemony, Kenneth Pomeranz, + TBA

• Cultural globalization, hegemony, postmodernity, countercultures, anti-globalization. 

• Classic theories; structure and conjuncture. 

• Global resource and ecological questions; the “earth system” and the “world system.”

Plus other topics and readings, variable according to student interest.

HIS 341K • Origins Of Modern Japan

39320 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 3.102
(also listed as ANS 341K )
show description

Same as Asian Studies 341K. This course examines Japan’s early modern age, from the end of the warring-states period in the 1500s to the stirrings of the industrial revolution in the mid 1800s.  The main focus is on the period of government by the Tokugawa shoguns (1600–1867), the final era of samurai rule.  Topics include social and economic change, national isolation and national opening, the Meiji revolution, and the origins of modern nationalism, imperialism, and democracy.   We pay special attention to the subjective experiences of Japanese women and men who lived and created Japan’s distinctive path to modernity.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Texts:

Conrad TOTMAN, Early Modern Japan, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993.

KATSU Kokichi, Musui’s Story: The Autobiography of a Tokugawa Samurai, trans. Teruko CRAIG, Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1991.

YAMAKAWA Kikue, Women of the Mito Domain, trans. Kate Wildman NAKAI (Stanford University Press, 2001).And others TBA.

Course requirements:

•    two midterm exams (worth 22.5% each)

•    two essays on class readings (15% each)

•    final essay (20%)

•    active class participation (5%)

HIS 350L • History Of Globalization

39360 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 0.120
show description

This upper-division seminar samples some influential ideas of global history considered in the context of contemporary globalization. We will consider what is new about contemporary globalization and what isn’t by examining the 19th-century origins of contemporary globalization and considering its antecedents in Renaissance and Early-Modern times.Globalization is defined here in an inclusive sense that highlights global circuits of people, information, products, culture, and capital.This course follows a mixed seminar and lecture format.  Active discussion work is required.Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

Required readings:

Available at University Coop.

1. Janet Abu-Lughod, Before European Hegemony: The World System, A.D. 1250–1350(Oxford University Press, 1991). ISBN: 0195067746

2. Mike Davis, Late Victorian Holocausts: El Niño Famines and the Making of the Third World(Verso, 2001). ISBN: 1859843824

3. Donella H. Meadows, Thinking in Systems: A Primer, ed. Diana Wright (Chelsea Green, 2008). ISBN: 1603580557

4. Manfred Steger, Globalization: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, [newest edition]). ISBN: 0199552266

5. Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents (Norton, 2003). ISBN: 0393324397

6. Handouts and online readings as specified over the course of the semester.

Course requirements and grading:

1. Participation in class discussion:  one overall grade, worth 20% of the course grade.

2. 9 papers of 1 to 1.5 pages each on weekly readings (altogether, 40% of the course grade).

3. Midterm essay (10% of course grade).

4. Final essay (partial revision of midterm essay; 20%).

5. Final examination (10%).

HIS 342C • Postwar Japan

39560 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 UTC 4.110
show description

Mark Metzler
Departments of History and Asian Studies
University of Texas at Austin
Office hours: M 1:00–2:30 and by appointment

 

 History 342C/Asian Studies 341N
[39560 / 30930]
Spring 2010

 Postwar Japan

 

This course begins by examining the transition from defeat and military occupation to the economic miracle of the 1960s.  Japan’s epoch-making high-speed growth then established the model for a new kind of accelerated development that has since unfolded across Asia.  This political and economic transformation was also a social and personal one, encompassing the remaking of family structures and ideologies.  The greatest lessons may lie in the aftermath of high-speed growth, especially in the transformations that accompanied the deflation of the economic bubble after 1990.  The semester concludes with a consideration of present trajectories and possible futures.

Hours: MWF 11:00–12:00, in UTC 4.110

 

Required texts:   

1. Jean-Marie BOUISSOU, Japan: The Burden of Success (Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 2002).

2. John W. DOWER, Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Aftermath of World War II (W.W. Norton/New Press, 1999).

3. R. Taggart MURPHY, The Weight of the Yen (W. W. Norton, 1997).

4. OCHIAI Emiko, The Japanese Family System in Transition (Tokyo: LTCB International Library Foundation, 1996 [orig. 1994]). 

5. Simon PARTNER, Toshié: A Story of Village Life in Twentieth-Century Japan (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004).

6. Handouts, online, and electronic reserve readings as specified over the course of the semester
(some listed below, some to be announced).

 

Course Schedule (subject to revision)

Week 1 (1/20, 1/22) Introduction #1 (Japan’s modern breakthrough)

 Read:  Bouissou, Japan, ch. 1, “Historical Background” (pp. 1–30)
           Partner, Toshié, ch. 1 (pp. 1–34)

 

Week 2 (1/25, 1/27, 1/29) Introduction #2 (The future is already here, it’s just not that
evenly distributed yet)

Read: 1. (E-Res) Jennifer Robertson, “Robo sapiens japanicus: Humanoid Robots and the
             Posthuman Family,” Critical Asian Studies, 39:3 (2007), 369–398
            [Also online at
            http://sitemaker.umich.edu/jennifer.robertson/files/robo_sapiens_cas_39_3__2007.pdf ]
       
2. (E-Res) R. Taggart Murphy, “Asia and the Meltdown of American Finance,”
          Japan Focus
, October 24, 2008 [Online at
          http://www.japanfocus.org/_R__Taggart_Murphy-Asia_and_the_Meltdown_of_American_Finance_ ]

 

PART ONE: The Postwar Transformation

Week 3 (2/1, 2/3, 2/5) The Road to Total War
Read: 1. Bouissou, Japan, ch. 1, “Historical Background” (pp. 30–38)
         2. Partner, Toshié, ch. 2 (pp. 35–58)


Week 4 (2/8, 2/10, 2/12) Total Defeat

Read: 1. John W. DOWER, Embracing Defeat, ch. 1, “Shattered Lives,” pp. 33–64
          2. Partner, Toshié, ch. 3 (pp. 59–102) 

 

Week 5 (2/15, 2/17, 2/19) Revolution from above 

 Read: 1. Bouissou, ch. 2, “The Occupation” (pp. 39–72)
          2. Dower, ch. 2, “Gifts from Heaven” and ch. 4, “Cultures of Defeat,” pp. 65–84,121–67
          3. Partner, Toshié, ch. 4 (pp. 103–126)

 
Wednesday 2/17: FIRST MIDTERM EXAM (Part 1)
, covering readings through Week 5

 
Week 6 (2/22, 2/24, 2/26) Revolution from below

Read: 1. Dower, ch. 8, “Making Revolution,” pp. 254–73
         2. (E-Res) Selections from Special Survey Committee, “Postwar Reconstruction”

 

Week 7 (3/1, 3/3, 3/5) The reverse course

 Read: 1. Bouissou, pp. 72–80
           2. Dower, Embracing Defeat, ch. 16, “What Do You Tell the Dead When You Lose?”,
           ch. 17, “Engineering Growth,” and Epilogue, pp. 485–564

 

Friday 3/5: FIRST MIDTERM EXAM (Part 2), covering readings through Week 7

PART TWO: The Great Boom

Week 8 (3/8, 3/10, 3/12) Consolidation and division, 1952–1960
Read: 1. Bouissou, ch. 3, “Foundations of the Miracle” (pp. 81–119)
         2. Partner, Toshié, ch. 5 and Conclusion (pp. 127–169)

 [Spring Break]

Week 9 (3/22, 3/24, 3/26) “The Japanese Miracle” (1) 

 Read: 1. Bouissou, Japan, ch. 4 (“The Miracle,” pp. 120–135)
          2. Murphy, Weight of the Yen:  Preface to pb. edition, Preface (pp. 11–21), Note on
              Terms, Introduction, ch. 1 (“The Japanese Company”), through p. 60
          3. Ochiai, Japanese Family System in Transition, “Introduction to the English Edition”
              through ch. 2 (pp. ix–35)

 

Week 10 (3/29, 3/31, 4/2) “The Japanese Miracle” (2)
Read:  1. Bouissou, pp. 135–166
          2. Murphy, ch. 2–3 (pp. 61–107)
          3. Ochiai, ch. 3–5 (pp. 37–83)

 

Week 11 (4/5, 4/7, 4/9) Limits and reorientation in the 1970s
Read: 1. Bouissou, ch. 5, “Shock-Absorber System” (pp. 167–213)
         2. Ochiai, Japanese Family, ch. 6–7 (pp. 85–124)
         3. Murphy, ch. 4–5 (pp. 108–164)

Friday 4/9: First essay due (on Ochiai)


Week 12 (4/12, 4/14, 4/16) “Japan as number one”

 Read: 1. Bouissou, ch. 6, “Dilemmas of Power” (pp. 214–226)
          2. (E-Res) Selections from Ezra VOGEL, Japan as Number One: Lessons for America
             (Harvard Univ. Press, 1979)
          3. Ochiai, Japanese Family, ch. 8–9 (pp. 125–167)
          4. Murphy, ch. 6–7 (pp. 165–218)

PART THREE: The Great Slowdown

Week 13 (4/19, 4/21, 4/23) The great bubble

 Read: 1. Bouissou, pp. 227–246
          2. Murphy, ch. 8–9 (pp. 219–270)
         
3. (E-Res) James FALLOWS, “Containing Japan,” Atlantic Monthly, May 1989, pp. 40–54
          4. (E-Res) Selections from ISHIHARA Shintar?, The Japan That Can Say No (Simon
              & Shuster, 1991 [orig. 1989])

Friday 4/23: Second essay due (on Murphy)
Final essay topics distributed

 

Week 14 (4/26, 4/28, 4/30) The great deflation
Read: 1. Bouissou, ch. 7, “End of the Japanese Model” (pp. 247–304)
         2. Murphy, ch. 10–end (pp. 271–319)
         3. Ochiai, Japanese Family, ch. 10 (pp. 169–186)
         4. (E-Res) Yamada Masahiro, “The Real Story Behind Japan’s Marriage Crisis,”
             Japan Echo
, Feb. 2006, pp. 20–24

Thurs. 4/30: Second MIDTERM EXAM

Week 15 (5/3, 5/5, 5/7) Trajectories and speculations
Read: 1. Bouissou, pp. 304–342
         2. (E-Res) Ochiai Emiko, “The Postwar Japanese Family System in Global
             Perspective: Familism, Low Fertility, and Gender Roles,” U.S.–Japan Women’s
             Journal
, No. 29, Dec. 2005, pp. 3–36
         3. (E-Res) Douglas McGray, “Japan’s Gross National Cool,” Foreign Policy, May-
            June 2002 (7 pp.)

     5/7: FINAL ESSAYS DUE (topics TBA)

 

Course requirements:
• two midterm exams (worth 22.5% each; the first midterm exam is divided into two equal
parts)
• two essays on class readings (15% each)
• final essay(s) (20%)
• active class participation (5%)

HIS 350L • History Of Globalization-W

39630 • Spring 2010
Meets W 300pm-600pm CAL 21
show description

Mark Metzler
Department of History
University of Texas at Austin
Office hrs.: M 1:00–2:30 & by appointment 

 

HST 350L
Seminar in the History of Globalization

 

 This upper-division seminar samples some influential ideas of global history considered in the context of contemporary globalization. We will consider what was new about the globalization of the 1990s and what wasn’t, also examining the late-19th-century origins of contemporary globalization and considering its renaissance and early-modern antecedents.

Globalization is defined here in an inclusive sense that highlights global circuits of people, information, products, culture, and capital.

This course follows a seminar rather than a lecture format.  Active discussion work is required.

Substantial writing component.

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

Hours: W 3:00–6:00, in CAL 21.  Attendance is mandatory.  

 

Required readings:
Available at University Coop.  Additional copies of some books will be placed on reserve at the
PCL.

1. Janet Abu-Lughod, Before European Hegemony: The World System, A.D. 1250–1350
(Oxford University Press, 1991). ISBN: 0195067746

2. Manuel Castells, The Rise of the Network Society (The Information Age: Economy, Society
and Culture, Vol. 1
), second edition (Blackwell, 2000). ISBN: 0631221409

3. Mike Davis, Late Victorian Holocausts: El Niño Famines and the Making of the Third World
(Verso, 2001). ISBN: 1859843824

4. Donella H. Meadows, Thinking in Systems: A Primer, ed. Diana Wright (Chelsea Green,
2008). ISBN: 1603580557

5. Manfred Steger, Globalization: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2003).
ISBN: 0199552266

6. Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents (Norton, 2003). ISBN: 0393324397

7. Handouts and online or electronic reserve readings as specified over the course of the
semester (some listed below, some to be announced).

 

Course Schedule (subject to revision)

 

I. (1/20) Introduction

II. (1/27) Some approaches to globalization
        1. Steger, Globalization: A Very Short Introduction (entire)
        2. Meadows, Thinking in Systems, pp. 1–72 

III. (2/3) Pre-European globalization (1)
        1. Abu-Lughod, Before European Hegemony, pp. 1–55; 102–184 

IV. (2/10) Pre-European globalization (2)
        1. Abu-Lughod, pp. 185–290; 316–373

V. (2/17) Structure and conjuncture
      1. (E-Res) Fernand Braudel, The Perspective of the World (Civilization & Capitalism, 15th-
          18th Century, Vol. 3; New York: Harper & Row, 1984 [orig. 1979]), Foreword and “The
          World-Economy and Divisions of Time,” pp. 17–20, 71–88.
      2. (E-Res or JSTOR) N. D. Kondratieff, “The Long Waves in Economic Life,” Review of
          Economic Statistics
, 17:6 (Nov. 1935), pp. 105–115.  (Abbreviated translation of “Die
          langen Wellen der Konjunktur,” Archiv für Sozialwissenschaft und Sozialpolitik, 1926.)
      3. Meadows, Thinking in Systems, pp. 75–110, Appendix (pp. 187–203) 

VI. (2/24) Paradigm shifts
       1. (E-Res) Thomas S. Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, second edition (Univ.
          of Chicago Press, 1970), selections
       2. (E-Res) Chris Freeman and Francisco Louçã, “Introduction: Technical Change and Long
           Waves in Economic Development” and ch. 9, “Age of ICT,” in As Time Goes By: From
           the Industrial Revolutions to the Information Revolution
(Oxford University Press, 2001),
           pp. 139–151, 301–335

VII. (3/3) The machine revolution
        1. (E-Res) Karl Marx, “Machinery and Modern Industry,” Ch. 15, Sections 1 and 3–5 of
            Capital
, Vol. 1 (pp. 371–386, 394–437 of the International Publishers edition)
        2. TBA

VIII. (3/10) The information age
        1. Castells, Rise of Network Society: Prologue and Ch. 1 (pp. 1–76); ch. 5 (pp. 358–372
            only); Ch. 6 and Conclusion (pp. 407–459, 500–509)

 First essay due; question TBA

[Spring break]

IX. (3/24) World industrialization: early statements
        1. Friedrich List, The National System of Political Economy (1844).  Available at
            http://www.econlib.org/library/YPDBooks/List/lstNPE.html
           also downloadable at
 http://books.google.com/books?id=4uuc7tdk0Z8C&printsec=frontcover&dq=friedrich+list,+national+system
        • Translator’s Preface; Memoir of the Author; Extracts from the Author’s Preface (31pp.)
        • Ch. 9, “The North Americans” and Ch. 10, “The Teachings of History” (20 pp.)
        • Ch. 11–13, pp. 97–131 

X. (3/31) Globalization and crisis in the 1990s (1)
        1. Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents, Preface and pp. 3–132

XI. (4/7) Globalization and crisis in the 1990s (2)
        1. Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents, pp. 133–165, 195–252

XII. (4/14) Late nineteenth-century globalization (1)
        1. Davis, Late Victorian Holocausts, through ch. 3 (to pg. 115)
            [chapters 4–6: read as you have the time]

XIII. (4/21) Late nineteenth-century globalization (2)
         1. Davis, Late Victorian Holocausts, chs. 7–9, pp. 211–310

XIV. (4/28) Time and place
         1. TBA

XV. (5/5) Trajectories
       1. TBA

   Second essay due (question TBA)

Final exam:  TBA.

Course requirements and grading:

1. Participation in class discussion:  one overall grade, worth 20% of the course grade.
2. 9 papers of 1 to 1.5 pages each on weekly readings
(altogether, 40% of the course grade).
3. Midterm essay
(10% of course grade).
4. Final essay
(partial revision of midterm essay; 20%).
    All papers should be double-spaced, using a 12-pt. Times font. 
5. Final examination
(10%).

HIS 341K • Origins Of Modern Japan

39940 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 UTC 3.112
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Japan from the end of the warring-states period to the beginnings of the industrial revolution, with a focus on the culmination of the age of samurai rule, the Tokugawa period (1600-1867). Topics include national unification and the perfection of samurai rule, social and economic development, national isolation and national opening, the Meiji revolution, and the origins of modern nationalism, imperialism, and democracy. We will focus especially on the subjective experiences of Japanese women and men who lived through and created Japan's distinctive path to modernity.

HIS 381 • History Of Globalization

40230 • Fall 2009
Meets TH 200pm-500pm GAR 1.122
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Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser. 


May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 342C • Postwar Japan

39035 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 UTC 4.110
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This course begins by examining the transition from war, defeat, and military occupation to the economic miracle of the 1960s.  Japan’s high-speed industrial growth established the model for a new kind of accelerated development that has since unfolded across Asia.  These political and economic transformations were also social and personal, encompassing the remaking of family structures and ideologies.  The greatest lessons may lie in the aftermath of high-speed growth, in the transformations that accompanied the deflation of the economic bubble after 1990.  The semester concludes with a consideration of present trajectories and possible futures.

 

Texts:

1. Andrew GORDON, A Modern History of Japan, third edition (Oxford University Press, 2013).
2. John W. DOWER, Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Aftermath of World War II (W.W. Norton/New Press, 1999).
3. R. Taggart MURPHY, The Weight of the Yen (W. W. Norton, 1997).
4. Handouts, online, and electronic reserve readings as specified over the course of the semester

 

 

Grading:

• two midterm exams (worth 20% each)
• two essays on class readings (15% each)
• final exam including take-home essays (25%)
• active class participation (5%)

 

HIS 350L • History Of Globalization-W

39120 • Spring 2009
Meets M 300pm-600pm CAL 21
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

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