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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Mark C. Smith

Associate Professor Ph.D., American Studies, 1980, University of Texas at Austin

Mark C. Smith

Contact

Biography

Research interests

His main research interests are the history of social science and the cultural history of alcohol and drugs.

Courses taught

His major teaching fields are American cultural and social history, especially of the twentieth century.

HIS 350R • Amer Cul Hist Alchl/Drugs

39640 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 436B
(also listed as AMS 370 )
show description

Most scholars of alcohol and drug use have concentrated upon its physiological aspects.  It is clear that addiction and craving have a physical and, in many cases, even a genetic basis.  Yet, as many anthropologists and sociologists have pointed out, cultures directly affect the types of drugs used, how they are used, and for what purposes.  In addition, one can examine a culture's drug use and attitude toward it and often discover a great deal about its functioning and values.  Thus, drug use is not only a cultural product but also a key social and historical descriptor.  In this course, we will study both how American culture affected the use of drugs and attitudes toward them and how these serve as keys to the changing American intellectual, social, and political landscape.  We will especially concentrate on alcohol, the opiates, marijuana, metamphetamines, and crack cocaine. We will note that the War on Drugs has been taking place for many years.

Topics to be considered include proliferation of alcohol abuse in the early Republic, the fight over cigarettes, the Prohibition movement, criminalization of drugs, Alcoholics Anonymous and treatment, medical response to addiction, and the drug war and the issue of legalization.

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

 

Requirements

Short analytical papers                           5% each

Longer analytical paper                          10%

Two reading quizzes                              15% each

Class participation                                25%

15 to 20 page research paper                  30%

 

Possible Texts

Michael Lerner, Dry Manhattan: Prohibition in New York City

Nate Blakeslee, Tulia: Cocaine, Race, and Corruption in a Small Texas Town

Nick Reding, Methland: The Death and Life of an American Small Town

Phillipe Bourgois and Jeffrey Schoenberg, Rigteous Dopefiends

Charles Bowden, Murder City: Cuidad Juarez and the Global Economy

Reading Packet

 

Upper-division standing required.  Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.  Students may not enroll in more than two AMS 370 courses in one semester.

Flag(s): Writing, Independent Inquiry

HIS 350R • Amer Cul Hist Alchl/Drugs

39970 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GEA 127
(also listed as AMS 370 )
show description

Most scholars of alcohol and drug use have concentrated upon its physiological aspects.  It is clear that addiction and craving have a physical and, in many cases, even a genetic basis.  Yet, as many anthropologists and sociologists have pointed out, cultures directly affect the types of drugs used, how they are used, and for what purposes.  In addition, one can examine a culture's drug use and attitude toward it and often discover a great deal about its functioning and values.  Thus, drug use is not only a cultural product but also a key social and historical descriptor.  In this course, we will study both how American culture affected the use of drugs and attitudes toward them and how these serve as keys to the changing American intellectual, social, and political landscape.  We will especially concentrate on alcohol, the opiates, marijuana, metamphetamines, and crack cocaine.

Topics to be considered include proliferation of alcohol abuse in the early Republic, the fight over cigarettes, the Prohibition movement, criminalization of drugs, Alcoholics Anonymous and treatment, medical response to addiction, and the drug war and the issue of legalization.

 

Requirements

Two short analytical papers                  5% each

Two reading quizzes                           15% each

Class participation                              20%

15 to 20 page research paper              40%

 

Possible Texts

Michael Lerner Dry Manhattan: Prohibition in New York City

Nate Blakeslee, Tulia: Cocaine, Race, and Corruption in a Small Texas Town

Nick Reding Methland: The Death and Life of an American Small Town

Phillipe Bourgois and Jeffrey Schoenberg Rigteous Dopefiends

Charles Bowden Murder City: Cuidad Juarez and the Global Economy

Reading Packet

 

Upper-division standing required.  Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.  Students may not enroll in more than two AMS 370 courses in one semester.

Flag(s): Writing

HIS 355N • Main Curr Of Amer Cul To 1865

40020 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 220
(also listed as AMS 355 )
show description

 "Who is this new man, this American?" Hector St. John de Crevecoeur

In many ways, what we now call the United States began as a national entity as a blank slate.  As late as two hundred years ago, there was no conception of what it meant to be American.  Yet, within seventy-five years, this entity would fight its most bloody and vicious war ever over insistence upon this very identity.

This course traces the concept of the American identity in cultural terms from the time of first settlements up until the Civil War.  We will study not politics per se but political ideas and institutions as well as such subjects as religion, work, gender roles, race, painting, literature, philosophy, the law, and social reform.  Throughout the course and especially in the assigned reading the emphasis will be upon the interaction of the lives of ordinary people including women, Native Americans, ethnic immigrants, and African Americans and the newly developing ideas and institutions that helped create this new American identity.  The books, indeed, will all be about very specific ordinary people—except for the very extraordinary Frederick Douglass—and the impact of a rapidly changing society upon their lives.

 

Requirements

There will three exams with the first counting slightly less than the final two.  Both will consist of identification and essay questions.

 

Possible Texts

William Cronon, Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England

James Horn, A Land as God Made It: Jamestown and the Birth of America

Alfred Young, The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution

Laurel Taylor Ulrich A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812

Carol Sheriff, The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress

Paul Johnson, Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper

Frederick Douglass, A Narrative of the Life of

 

Upper-division standing required. Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.

Flag(s): Cultural Diversity

HIS 356K • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

39935 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 134
(also listed as AMS 356 )
show description

White Protestant males and their ideas dominated America up until the time of the Civil War.  For better or worse, this progressively becomes less true after this time.  Americans faced with what the philosopher William James called “a booming buzzing confusion” developed many new ways of coping with massive change.  In addition to such conventional historical topics as politics and economics, we will examine the fine arts, architecture, technology, science, social reform, literature, photography, documentary film, and literature.  We will also note the roles and lives of immigrants, minority groups, and women in the conversation.

 

Requirements

Three exams, all non-cumulative.

 

Possible Texts

Horatio Alger, Ragged Dick

John Kasson, Amusing the Millions

Willa Cather, My Antonia

Edward Larson, Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America’s Continuing Debate over Science and Religion

Donald Worster, The Dust Bowl

William Doyle, An American Insurrection: The Battle of Oxford, Mississippi

Mike Davis, Ecology of Fear: Los Angeles and the Imagination of Disaster

 

Upper-division standing required. Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.

Flag(s): Cultural Diversity

 

HIS 350R • Amer Cul Hist Alcohol/Drugs

39580 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 0.132
(also listed as AMS 370 )
show description

Most scholars of alcohol and drug use have concentrated upon its physiological aspects.  It is clear that addiction and craving have a physical and, in many cases, even a genetic basis.  Yet, as many anthropologists and sociologists have pointed out, cultures directly affect the types of drugs used, how they are used, and for what purposes.  In addition, one can examine a culture's drug use and attitude toward it and often discover a great deal about its functioning and values.  Thus, drug use is not only a cultural product but also a key social and historical descriptor.  In this course, we will study both how American culture affected the use of drugs and attitudes toward them and how these serve as keys to the changing American intellectual, social, and political landscape.  We will especially concentrate on alcohol, the opiates, marijuana, metamphetamines, and crack cocaine.

Topics to be considered include proliferation of alcohol abuse in the early Republic, the fight over cigarettes, the Prohibition movement, criminalization of drugs, Alcoholics Anonymous and treatment, medical response to addiction, and the drug war and the issue of legalization.

 

Requirements

Two short analytical papers                  5% each

Two reading quizzes                            15% each

Class participation                               20%

15 to 20 page research paper               40%

 

Possible Texts

Michael Lerner Dry Manhattan: Prohibition in New York City

Alcoholics Anonymous Alcoholics Anonymous (the Big Book)

Nate Blakeslee, Tulia: Cocaine, Race, and Corruption in a Small Texas Town

Nick Reding Methland: The Death and Life of an American Small Town

Charles Bowden Murder City: Cuidad Juarez and the Global Economy

Reading Packet

 

Upper-division standing required.  Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.  Students may not enroll in more than two AMS 370 courses in one semester.

Flag(s): Writing

 

HIS 389 • End Of Amer Innocence, 1900-20

39860 • Spring 2013
Meets M 1200pm-300pm BUR 436B
(also listed as AMS 390 )
show description

End of American Innocence: America Faces Modernity, 1880-1929

The cultural historian Henry May referred to the first two decades of the twentieth century as “the end of American innocence.”  It was a time of both the eternal truths of the nineteenth century and the probabilistic universe of the 1920s.  Or as May put it, “it was a time when the past was dying but not yet dead and the future was being born but was not yet alive.”  As these two views of the world vied for supremacy, the cultural, political, and artistic movements reflected both sides simultaneously.  While social reforms included such progressive reforms as restrictions on labor for children and women, the Federal Reserve Act, and regulation of food, they also looked back to immigration restriction, prohibition of alcohol, and the Mann Act. We will examine American cultural and social life of this time and encourage research papers that reflect the creative ambiguity of the period.

Requirements

One 25 to 30 page research paper (50%); one assigned outside book and leading or co-leading a class and a 5 page integrative paper on the assigned book (10%); and class participation (40%).  You will be given the final month off to write your paper.

Possible Texts

Matthew Fry Jacobson Barbarian Virtues: The United States Encounters Foreign People at Home and Abroad

Gail Bederman Manliness and Civilization: A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the United States, 1880-1917

Roy Rosenzweig Eight Hours for What We Will: Work and Leisure in an Industrial City 1870-1920

Timothy J. Gilfoyle A Pickpocket’s Tale: The Underworld of 19th Century New York

William Cronon Nature’s Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West

Margaret Finnegan Selling Suffrage: Consumer Culture and Votes for Women

Kristen Hoganson Global Production of American Domesticity 1865-1920

Clifford Putney Muscular Christianity: Manhood and Sports in Protestant America 1880-1920

Michael Kazin A Godly Hero: The Life of William Jennings Bryan

William Leach Land of Desire: Merchants, Power and the Rise of a New American Culture

Natalia Molina Fit to Be Citizens?: Public Health and Race in Los Angeles, 1879-1939

 

HIS S356K • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

85685 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 136
(also listed as AMS S356 )
show description

At the end of the Civil War, American society became flooded with new technologies, ideas, and customs.  A society that had bewildered earlier American visitors in its diversity and creativity accelerated its already frantic pace.  This course attempts to identify and describe some of the major elements of the “booming, buzzing, confusion” of changing American culture and relate their impact upon the lives of some common and not so common Americans.

This is a large order, especially in a shortened summer session so I will concentrate upon key historical periods as representatives of intensive social and intellectual change: the period from 1890 to the start of World War I; the 1920s and 30s; and from the end of World War II to until the present.  Some of the themes covered will be industrialism and labor unrest; social Darwinism and the adulation of the rich; race, gender, and ethnicity; Modernism; the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl; the civil rights movement; and the rise of the New Right.  Material in the course will be interdisciplinary and will include material from such perspectives as anthropology, architecture, art history, documentary photography, economics, literature, history of science, social history, social reform, and technology.  It also tries to include the experiences and perspectives of as many different groups as possible.  Reading will be heavily oriented toward the individual’s own words and behavior as they lived through history.

 

Requirements

A midterm and final tests.

 

Possible Texts

Horatio Alger Ragged Dick and Mark the Match Boy

David Van Droehle Triangle: The Fire That Changed America

Timothy Egan The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the American Dust Bowl

William Doyle An American Insurrection: The Battle of Oxford, Mississippi 1962

Thomas Frank What’s the Matter with Kansas?: How Conservatives Won the Heart of America

 

Upper-division standing required. Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.

Flag(s): Cultural Diversity

HIS 350R • Amer Cul Hist Alcohol/Drugs

39445 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 0.132
(also listed as AMS 370 )
show description

Most scholars of alcohol and drug use have concentrated upon its physiological aspects.  It is clear that addiction and craving have a physical and, in many cases, even a genetic basis.  Yet, as many anthropologists and sociologists have pointed out, cultures directly affect the types of drugs used, how they are used, and for what purposes.  In addition, one can examine a culture's drug use and attitude toward it and often discover a great deal about its functioning and values.  Thus, drug use is not only a cultural product but also a key social and historical descriptor.  In this course, we will study both how American culture affected the use of drugs and attitudes toward them and how these serve as keys to the changing American intellectual, social, and political landscape.  We will especially concentrate on alcohol, the opiates, marijuana, LSD, and crack cocaine.

Topics to be considered include proliferation of alcohol abuse in the early Republic, the fight over cigarettes, the Prohibition movement, criminalization of drugs, Alcoholics Anonymous and treatment, medical response to addiction, and the drug war and the issue of legalization.

 

Requirements

Two short analytical papers     5% each

Two reading quizzes               15% each

Class participation                  20%

15 to 20 page research paper  40%

 

Possible Texts

W.J. Rorabaugh, The Alcoholic Republic:  An American Tradition

Cassandra Tate, Cigarette Wars: The Triumph of the Little White Slaver 

Michael Massing, The Fix

Harry Gene Levine, Crack in America: Demon Drugs and Social Justice

Nate Blakeslee, Tulia: Cocaine, Race, and Corruption in a Small Texas Town

 

Upper-division standing required.  Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.  Students may not enroll in more than two AMS 370 courses in one semester.

Flag(s): Writing

HIS 356K • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

39505 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 136
(also listed as AMS 356 )
show description

This course surveys U.S. cultural history from the Civil War to the present.  We will examine the history of America through the lens of culture using methodology from an interdisciplinary approach grounded in American studies.  We will explore major transformations and themes as we work chronologically as well as travel back and forth in time to understand the significant ideas and social and cultural practices that shaped America's national consciousness.  In particular, we will explore how the U.S. emerged as a nation from the late nineteenth through the twentieth century and assess the ways in which this nation defined itself vis-à-vis the rest of the world.  Along with these questions, we will also investigate the cultural and social trends that shaped intellectual and political debates and analyze the cultural productions that reflect and refract those historical moments. Uncovering various sites of culture, we will attempt to reconstruct and deconstruct different media including books, films, political cartoons, television shows, music, fashion, and other forms to understand their significance.  The following themes will be covered in this class:  U.S. nationalism, the rise of industrialization and consumer culture; debates over immigration and citizenship; U.S. imperial expansion; race, gender, class, and sexuality in popular representations; and much more.

 

Requirements

Paper                          (25%)

Midterm                      (30%)

Final Exam                  (35%)

Participation                (10%) (attendance, quizzes, extra-credit, blackboard discussions, and other optional activities)

 

Possible Texts

Janet M. Davis, The Circus Age

Anzia Yezierska, Bread Givers

Carlos Bulosan, America Is in the Heart

Elaine Tyler May, Homeward Bound

Susan Douglas, Where the Girls Are

Luis Alberto Urrea, The Devil's Highway

 

Upper-division standing required. Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.

Flag(s): Cultural Diversity

HIS 355N • Main Curr Of Amer Cul To 1865

39465 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 136
(also listed as AMS 355 )
show description

Description

"Who is this new man, this American?" Hector St. John de Crevecoeur

In many ways, what we now call the United States began as a national entity as a blank slate.  As late as two hundred years ago, there was no conception of what it meant to be American.  Yet, within seventy-five years, this entity would fight its most bloody and vicious war ever over insistence upon this very identity.

This course traces the concept of the American identity in cultural terms from the time of first settlements up until the Civil War.  We will study not politics per se but political ideas and institutions as well as such subjects as religion, work, gender roles, race, painting, literature, philosophy, the law, and social reform.  Throughout the course and especially in the assigned reading the emphasis will be upon the interaction of the lives of ordinary people including women, Native Americans, ethnic immigrants, and African Americans and the newly developing ideas and institutions that helped create this new American identity.  The books, indeed, will all be about very specific ordinary people—except for the very extraordinary Frederick Douglass—and the impact of a rapidly changing society upon their lives.

 

Requirements

There will three exams with the first counting slightly less than the final two.  Both will consist of identification and essay questions. 

 

Possible Texts

Nathaniel Philbrick,  Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War

Betty Wood, Slavery in Colonial America

Gordon Wood, Americanization of Benjamin Franklin

Alfred Young, The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution

Carol Sheriff, The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress

Paul Johnson, Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper

Frederick Douglass, A Narrative of the Life of

 

 

Upper-division standing required. Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.

Flag(s): Cultural Diversity

 

HIS 356K • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

84985 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm GEA 105
(also listed as AMS 356 )
show description

At the end of the Civil War, American society became flooded with new technologies, ideas, and customs.  A society that had bewildered earlier American visitors in its diversity and creativity accelerated its already frantic pace.  This course attempts to identify and describe some of the major elements of the “booming, buzzing, confusion” of changing American culture and relate their impact upon the lives of some common and not so common Americans.

This is a large order, especially in a shortened summer session so I will concentrate upon key historical periods as representatives of intensive social and intellectual change: the period from 1890 to the start of World War I; the 1920s and 30s; and from the end of World War II to until the present.  Some of the themes covered will be industrialism and labor unrest; social Darwinism and the adulation of the rich; race, gender, and ethnicity; Modernism; the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl; the civil rights movement; and the rise of the New Right.  Material in the course will be interdisciplinary and will include material from such perspectives as anthropology, architecture, art history, documentary photography, economics, literature, history of science, social history, social reform, and technology.  It also tries to include the experiences and perspectives of as many different groups as possible.  Reading will be heavily oriented toward the individual’s own words and behavior as they lived through history.

 

Requirements

A midterm and final tests.

 

Possible Texts

Horatio Alger Ragged Dick and Mark the Match Boy

David Van Droehle Triangle: The Fire That Changed America

Timothy Egan The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the American Dust Bowl

William Doyle An American Insurrection: The Battle of Oxford, Mississippi 1962

Thomas Frank What’s the Matter with Kansas?: How Conservatives Won the Heart of America

 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.

Flags: Cultural Diversity

HIS 356K • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

39750 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm BUR 116
show description

Description: This is a lecture course on postwar American culture and society with special emphasis on the 1950s and 1960s. Issues to be discussed include the domestic impact of the Cold War, the effects of McCarthyism on politics and the entertainment world, the problems of affluence in the 1950s, the civil rights and anti-war movements of the 1960s, the cultural relationships between the United States and the rest of the world, as well as conflicts between blacks and whites, the middle class and blue-collar workers, men and women, parents and children. The lectures will deal primarily with cultural and intellectual history, while the reading draws heavily on novels, journalism and social criticism.  Therefore, no one should enroll in this course who has not already taken at least one, preferably upper-division, course in 20th century American history.  Nor should anyone take the course if they are unfamiliar with trends in modern American literature, art, music, and movies.  In addition, since students will be asked to write two 10-15 page papers (there are no exams) based on the reading, you should not register for the course if you are unaccustomed to writing in-depth analytical essays, especially about novels.

Texts: Partial List, All Required:   

  • Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man
  • John Updike, Rabbit Run
  • Joan Didion, Slouching Towards Bethlehem
  • Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique
  • Norman Mailer, The Armies of the Night
  • Richard Pells, Not Like Us: How Europeans Have Loved, Hated, and Transformed American Culture Since World War II

Grading:

Two 10-15 page papers, each counting 50% of the course grade.  Each paper will analyze two books on the reading list, one of which must be a novel.  The first paper will deal with the culture of the 1940s and 1950s; the second, with American culture from the 1960s to the present.


HIS 350L • Am Cul Hist Of Alchl/Drugs-W

40070 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 RLM 5.124
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 356K • Main Curr Amer Cul Since 1865

84945 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1130 GAR 1.126
show description

Description: This is a lecture course on postwar American culture and society with special emphasis on the 1950s and 1960s. Issues to be discussed include the domestic impact of the Cold War, the effects of McCarthyism on politics and the entertainment world, the problems of affluence in the 1950s, the civil rights and anti-war movements of the 1960s, the cultural relationships between the United States and the rest of the world, as well as conflicts between blacks and whites, the middle class and blue-collar workers, men and women, parents and children. The lectures will deal primarily with cultural and intellectual history, while the reading draws heavily on novels, journalism and social criticism.  Therefore, no one should enroll in this course who has not already taken at least one, preferably upper-division, course in 20th century American history.  Nor should anyone take the course if they are unfamiliar with trends in modern American literature, art, music, and movies.  In addition, since students will be asked to write two 10-15 page papers (there are no exams) based on the reading, you should not register for the course if you are unaccustomed to writing in-depth analytical essays, especially about novels.

Texts: Partial List, All Required:   

  • Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man
  • John Updike, Rabbit Run
  • Joan Didion, Slouching Towards Bethlehem
  • Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique
  • Norman Mailer, The Armies of the Night
  • Richard Pells, Not Like Us: How Europeans Have Loved, Hated, and Transformed American Culture Since World War II

Grading:

Two 10-15 page papers, each counting 50% of the course grade.  Each paper will analyze two books on the reading list, one of which must be a novel.  The first paper will deal with the culture of the 1940s and 1950s; the second, with American culture from the 1960s to the present.


HIS 350L • Am Cul Hist Of Alchl/Drugs-W

39180 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm GAR 1.134
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

Publications

Articles

“American Social Science: An Overview,” Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History, ed. Paul Boyer, Scott E. Caspar, and Joan Shelley Rubin, New York: Oxford University Press, scheduled 2012

“Alcoholism in Finland and the United States,” Suomi-USA Magazine, League of Finnish-American Societies, Helsinki, Finland, May, 2011, 18

“Same Beginnings, Different Ends: A Comparative View of Attitudes and Policies Toward Alcohol in Finland and the United States,” Suomi-USA Magazine, League of Finnish-American Societies, Helsinki, Finland, May, 2011, 16-17

“Alcohol Policy under the Microscope,” Helsinki Times, April 7,  2011, p. 2 

More and Less Than Prohibition: A Comparative View of Temperance Movements and Alcohol Institutions and Policies in Finland and the United States,” Juhalenot, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland, December 10, 2010

“Hobson, Richmond Pearson,” Alcohol and Drugs in North America: A Historical Encyclopedia, ed. David Fahey and Jon Miller, Santa Barbara Ca., ABC-CLIO, forthcoming 

“Robert and Helen Lynd” International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, second edition, ed. William Darity, Farmington Hills, Minnesota, Macmillan Reference, 2008

“A Tale of Two Charlies: Political Science, History, and Civic Reform, 1890-1940,”Modern Political Science: Anglo-American Exchanges Since 1880 ed.  Robert Adcock, Mark Bevir, and Shannon C. Stimson, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007, 118-36 

“Ulrich Bonnell Phillips,” New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Charles R. Wilson (ed.), Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006, 291-2

“The Maine Law and Prohibition,” Encyclopedia of New England Culture, Burt Feintuch and David Watters (ed.), New Haven: Yale University Press, 2005, 929

“Cowley, Malcolm,” Encyclopedia of the Great Depression, Robert S. McElvaine (ed.) New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004, 215-16 

“Odum, Howard,” Encyclopedia of the Great Depression, Robert S. McElvaine (ed.) New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004, 727-28 

“President’s Committee on Social Trends,” Encyclopedia of the Great Depression, Robert S. McElvaine (ed.) New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004, 768-69 

“Lawrence Kolb,” Alcohol and Temperance in Modern History: An International Encyclopedia, Santa Barbara, Ca.: ABC-CLIO, 2003, 352

“Joseph E. Turner,” Alcohol and Temperance in Modern History: An International Encyclopedia, Santa Barbara, Ca.: ABC-CLIO, 2003, 625

“American Social Science,” The Oxford Companion to American History, Paul Boyer (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 2001, 727-28

“Witch-hunting during America’s First War on Drugs: Richmond Pearson

Hobson and “Narcotic Education,’” in Fear Itself: Enemies Real and Imagined in American Culture, Nancy L. Schultz (ed.), Lafayette: Purdue University Press, 1998, 303-12

“Academics, Advocacy, and the Public Schools: A View from the 1930s," Role of Advocacy in the Classroom, ed. Patricia Meyer Sparks New York: St. Martin's Press, 1996, 143-49

"Clarence Ayres," The Handbook of Texas, Ronnie Tyler, et. al.(eds.), Austin:Texas State Historical Society, 1996, I, 325

 "C. Wright Mills," The Handbook of Texas, Ronnie Tyler, et. al, (eds.), Austin: Texas State Historical Society, 1996, IV, 749-50

"William Archibald Dunning," American National Biography ed. John Garraty and Mark Carnes, New York: Oxford, 1999, v.7, 104-05

"Harold D. Lasswell," American National Biography New York: Oxford, 1999, v.13, 225-27

"Wesley C. Mitchell," American National Biography New York: Oxford, 1999, v.15, 623-25

"Stuart A. Rice," American National Biography New York: Oxford, 1999, v. 19, 424-25

Ulrich Bonnell Phillips," Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Charles Wilson and William Ferris (eds.), Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1989, 297

"Southern History and Myth: Ulrich Bonnell Phillips Reconsidered," Journal of the American Studies Association of Texas, XV 1985, 9-13

"Rejoinder to Theodore Caplow 'Social Criticism in Middletown: Taking Aim at a Moving Target, '"Qualitative Sociology, VIII (no. 1), February, 1985, 47-48

"Has America Really Changed?: The Case of Middletown, 1925-1983, Journal of the American Studies Association of Texas, XIV, 1984, 22-28

"From Middletown to Middletown III: A Critical Review Essay," Qualitative Sociology, VII (no. 4),  Winter, 1984, 72-81

"Fifty Years of an American City: Stability and Change in Middletown," Indian Journal of American Studies, XIV (no.1), January, 1984, 57-66 

"Robert Lynd and Consumerism in the 1930s," Journal of the History of Sociology, II (no.1), 1980, 99-119

Books

Social Science in the Crucible: The American Debate over Objectivity and Purpose, 1918-1941 Duke University Press 1994

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