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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Penne L. Restad

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., 1994, University of Texas at Austin

Distinguished Senior Lecturer

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7233
  • Office: GAR 2.144
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: M 1-3 p.m., W 3-4 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Areas

American social and cultural history, with particular interest in the history of American holidays, public ritual, consumer culture, and national identity. 

Research interests

Dr. Restad's scholarship explores the formation of American cultural identities and behaviors, the history of consumer culture, and the scholarship of teaching and learning in higher education. 

Dr. Restad regularly teaches U.S. history surveys, courses in Liberal Arts Honors, and seminars related to her research interests.

HIS 315K • United States, 1492-1865-Hon

39325 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 105
show description

This class will survey American history through the Civil War, keeping a collective mind openabout which and why certain facts, stories, events, and people are key to understanding our past.It draws on two popular American history books that offer complementary, sometimes conflicting,interpretations of the American story to illuminate the rich textures of the nationʼs history as wellas the particular challenges faced in its writing. Using these authorities as a starting point,participants will work collaboratively to expand their understanding of American history and toengage in the type of thinking required to “do” history.

 

 

Texts:

Johnson, History of the American People

 

Zinn, A Peopleʼs History of the United States (available free online, but without page numbers)

 

Davidson and Lytle, After the Fact, vol. I

 

Additional readings, available as posted on Blackboard

 

 

Grading:

Grades will be determined on the basis of individual quiz grades (20%), four in-class essays (35%), team work: journal preparation, templates, peer evaluation (20%), and a final exam (25%).

HIS 317N • Thinking Like A Historian

39465 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.120
show description

“History is, indeed, an argument without end,” wrote the great American historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. This sophomore seminar for history majors will read, discuss, argue, and write about a wide range of books, articles, and primary sources in order to consider the nature of historical inquiry. We will explore what constitutes sound historical thinking, including how scholars choose sources, pose questions, construct arguments, and converse with each other in print—and use these insights to model our own thinking, research, and writing. Students will keep a blackboard journal, write short response papers, and develop a written framework for a historiography project.

 

Texts:

Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre,1984.

Thomas Bender, ed., The Antislavery Debate, 1992  (available electronically, PCL)

Edward Larson, Summer for the Gods, 1997

Edward Linenthal, Preserving Memory, 1995.

Additional articles and primary sources will be posted or linked on Blackboard.

 

Grading:

Six short papers 40%

Research project framework 30%

Journal 15%

Participation 15%

HIS 315L • The United States Snc 1865-Hon

39715 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GDC 1.406
show description

This class will survey over 150 years of modern American history, keeping a collective mind openabout which and why certain facts, stories, events, and people are key to understanding our past.It draws on two popular American history books that offer complementary, sometimes conflicting,interpretations of the American story to illuminate the rich textures of the nationʼs history as wellas the particular challenges faced in its writing. Using these authorities (as well as a basic Outlineof U.S. History) as a starting point, participants will work collaboratively to expand theirunderstanding of American history and to engage in the type of thinking required to “do” history.

REQUIRED

U.S. Government, Outline of U.S. History, chapters 8-15.

http://www.america.gov/publications/books/history-outline.html

Johnson, History of the American People,

Zinn, A Peopleʼs History of the United States (available online, but without page numbers)

HIS 350R • Myth/Construc Of Amer Ident

39965 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm RLM 7.112
show description

What defines an American? Is it the love of liberty, the pursuit of justice, the urge to invent, the desire for wealth, the drive to explore? The purpose of this seminar is to examine--through reading, discussion, and writing—the historical origins of and perspectives on “American identity,” to investigate the stories about ourselves and our past that we have developed to illustrate and confirm its elements, and to assess ongoing claims to American exceptionalism. 

 Texts:

Crevecouer,  “What is an American?” 

 Horwitz, Confederates in the Attic

David R. Jansson, “American National Identity and the Progress of the New South”

Horatio Alger, Ragged Dick

 Kao and Copulsky, “The Pledge of Allegiance”

 Tom Englehardt, The End of Victory Culture

Jim Cullen, The American Dream

Hackney, “The American Identity”

Grading:

Grades will be determined on the basis class participation and attendance (15%), short papers (40%), individual and collaborative visual presentations (5%), and a 7 to 10-page research paper project (assembled in stages) (40%). Plus and minus will be used in assigning a course grade.

HIS 315K • United States, 1492-1865-Hon

39635 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.118
show description

This class will survey American history through the Civil War, keeping a collective mind openabout which and why certain facts, stories, events, and people are key to understanding our past.It draws on two popular American history books that offer complementary, sometimes conflicting,interpretations of the American story to illuminate the rich textures of the nationʼs history as wellas the particular challenges faced in its writing. Using these authorities as a starting point,participants will work collaboratively to expand their understanding of American history and toengage in the type of thinking required to “do” history.

Texts:

Johnson, History of the American People

Zinn, A Peopleʼs History of the United States (available free online, but without page numbers)

Davidson and Lytle, After the Fact, vol. I

Additional readings, available as posted on Blackboard

Grading:

Grades will be determined on the basis of individual quiz grades (20%), four in-class essays (35%), team work: journal preparation, templates, peer evaluation (20%), and a final exam (25%).

HIS 317N • Thinking Like A Historian

39680 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm GAR 1.126
show description

Course designed for sophomore students interested in studying history

 

“History is, indeed, an argument without end,” wrote the great American historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. This sophomore seminar for history majors will read, discuss, argue, and write about a wide range of books, articles, and primary sources in order to consider the nature of historical inquiry. We will explore what constitutes sound historical thinking, including how scholars choose sources, pose questions, construct arguments, and converse with each other in print—and use these insights to model our own thinking, research, and writing. Students will keep a blackboard journal, write short response papers, and develop a written framework for a historiography project.

 

Texts:

Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre,1984.

Thomas Bender, ed., The Antislavery Debate, 1992  (available electronically, PCL)

Edward Larson, Summer for the Gods, 1997

Edward Linenthal, Preserving Memory, 1995.

Additional articles and primary sources will be posted or linked on Blackboard.

 

Grading:

Six short papers 40%

Research project framework 30%

Journal 15%

Participation 15%

HIS 315L • The United States Snc 1865-Hon

39355 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 2.128
show description

This class will survey over 150 years of modern American history, keeping a collective mind openabout which and why certain facts, stories, events, and people are key to understanding our past.It draws on two popular American history books that offer complementary, sometimes conflicting,interpretations of the American story to illuminate the rich textures of the nationʼs history as wellas the particular challenges faced in its writing. Using these authorities (as well as a basic Outlineof U.S. History) as a starting point, participants will work collaboratively to expand theirunderstanding of American history and to engage in the type of thinking required to “do” history.

REQUIRED

U.S. Government, Outline of U.S. History, chapters 8-15.

http://www.america.gov/publications/books/history-outline.html

Johnson, History of the American People,

Zinn, A Peopleʼs History of the United States (available online, but without page numbers)

HIS 350R • Myth/Construc Of Amer Ident

39570 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 2.112
show description

“Americans are generous, hard-working, and patriotic.”  No, that’s not entirely accurate  “Americans are innovative, individualistic, capitalists.”  That doesn’t seem quite right either.  Independent? Religious? Adventurous?  No? Yes? Then what is an “American”? This upper-division undergraduate seminar is a writing- and reading-intensive course centered on the questions “What are the key components of American Identity ?” and “What are their origins and uses?” Using a number of theoretical and methodological lenses, we will seek to discover how the concept of identity has shaped how we explain ourselves to ourselves and others, and  has affected how others see us at various points in our history.

 

Tentative Reading List

Hector St. Jean de Crevecoeur, Letters from an American Farmer

Philip Deloria, Playing Indian

Garry Wills, Lincoln at Gettysburg

Horatio Alger, Ragged Dick

David Potter, People of Plenty

Tom Englehardt, The End of Victory Culture

           

Tentative Assignments  

Class participation: 20%

Reaction papers to weekly readings (1-2 pages each): 15%

Critical essay I (5 pages): 15%

Critical essay II (5 pages): 20%

Final essay (8-10 pages):  30%

HIS 315K • United States, 1492-1865-Hon

39170 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CBA 4.330
show description

This class will survey American history through the Civil War, keeping a collective mind openabout which and why certain facts, stories, events, and people are key to understanding our past.It draws on two popular American history books that offer complementary, sometimes conflicting,interpretations of the American story to illuminate the rich textures of the nationʼs history as wellas the particular challenges faced in its writing. Using these authorities as a starting point,participants will work collaboratively to expand their understanding of American history and toengage in the type of thinking required to “do” history.

REQUIRED

Johnson, History of the American People

Zinn, A Peopleʼs History of the United States (available free online, but without page numbers)

Davidson and Lytle, After the Fact, vol. I

Additional readings, available as posted on Blackboard

GRADES and ABSENCE.

Grades will be determined on the basis of individual quiz grades (20%), four in-classessays (35%), team work: journal preparation, templates, peer evaluation (20%), and a finalexam (25%). Additional information about each of these categories is in the Course Structure.Grades will not be posted on Blackboard, however you are welcome to visit the instructor to viewthem during office hours or by appointment as often as you wish. Plus and minus will be used inassigning a course grade.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39175 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 4.102
show description

This class will survey over 150 years of modern American history, keeping a collective mind openabout which and why certain facts, stories, events, and people are key to understanding our past.It draws on two popular American history books that offer complementary, sometimes conflicting,interpretations of the American story to illuminate the rich textures of the nationʼs history as wellas the particular challenges faced in its writing. Using these authorities (as well as a basic Outlineof U.S. History) as a starting point, participants will work collaboratively to expand theirunderstanding of American history and to engage in the type of thinking required to “do” history.

REQUIRED

U.S. Government, Outline of U.S. History, chapters 8-15.

http://www.america.gov/publications/books/history-outline.html

Johnson, History of the American People,

Zinn, A Peopleʼs History of the United States (available online, but without page numbers)

iClicker, available at Coop . Register on Blackboard/ ToolsAdditional readings, available as posted on class website. (password provided in class)https://sites.la.utexas.edu/history2point0Optional: Foner, Give Me Liberty

GRADES and ABSENCE.

Grades will be determined on the basis of individual quiz grades (20%), four in-classessays (30%), team work: journal preparation and templates (23%), survey participation (2%),and a final exam (25%).

HIS 350R • Consuming America

39420 • Fall 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 0.132
show description

A half-century ago the historian David Potter argued in People of Plenty thatAmerican abundance played a crucial role in creating and sustaining American democracy. More recently,historians have highlighted the role of consumption in shaping all aspects of American society.This course will explore the history of the relationship between the American consumer and thenation's social history. It will address such topics as the use of colonial boycotts to challengeBritish political control, the impact of the rise of a mass market at the end of the 19th century, andthe making of a middle-class society in the twentieth century. It will examine issues concerningwomen shoppers (and shoplifters), the immigrant experience, ideas about the morality and themeaning of spending, and advertising's role in shaping the American economy and society.This is a seminar. Expect to talk.

GRADES

participation and attendance (15%)

short papers (35%)

a collaborative visual presentation (5%)

7 to 10-page research paper (45%).

REQUIRED READING

Cohen, A Consumersʼ Republic

Cross, All-Consuming Century

Leach, Land of Desire

Schor and Holt, The Consumer Society Reader

Additional readings posted on Blackboard

HIS 315L • The United States Snc 1865-Hon

39210 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 2.128
show description

This class will survey over 150 years of modern American history, keeping a collective mind open about which and why certain facts, stories, events, and people are key to understanding our past.  Two popular American history texts and an extensive selection of primary sources will challenge students to examine the past from multiple perspectives.  

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Students will be able to construct a basic, meaningful, and intellectually honest narrative America's history from late 19th century to the present; execute a basic set of moves that constitute historical thinking; comprehend, ponder, and write about key ideas, events, concepts, and interpretations relating to the history of the period; and work collaboratively as well as independently.

 

TENTATIVE READING LIST

U.S. Government,  Outline of U.S. History (on line)

Paul Johnson, History of the American People

Howard Zinn, A People’s History of the United States

Additional readings, mostly primary source material, will be made available.

 

GRADES

Grading will be determined on the basis of individual quiz grades (25%), team work (15%), peer evaluation (3%), two midterms (12 and 15% respectively), and one final exam (30%). Note that percentages are tentative. Plus and minus grading will be used.  

 

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39145 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 3.102
show description

This class will survey over 150 years of modern American history, keeping a collective mind open about which and why certain facts, stories, events, and people are key to understanding our past.   It draws on two popular American history books that offer complementary, sometimes conflicting, interpretations of the American story to illuminate the rich textures of the nation’s history as well as the particular challenges faced in its writing. Using these authorities (as well as the basic Outline of U.S. History) as a starting point, participants will work collaboratively to expand their understanding of American history and to engage in the type of thinking required to understand and “do” history.   

REQUIRED 

 U.S. Government,  Outline of U.S. History, chs. 8-15.    http://www.america.gov/publications/books/history-outline.html

Johnson, History of the American PeopleZinn, A People’s History of the United States

 iClicker,  available at Coop

Additional readings, available as posted on class website.     http://laits.utexas.edu/sites/history2point0/

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Students will be able to-construct a basic, meaningful, and intellectually honest narrative America's history from late 19th century to the present-execute a basic set of moves that constitute historical thinking-comprehend, ponder, and write about key ideas, events, concepts, and interpretations relating to the history of the period.

CIVILITY, EXAMINATIONS, GRADING, ABSENCES, ETC. 

Messages, course revisions, study guides, etc. will be posted on history2.0/Resources. No hard copy will be distributed.

You are expected to attend each class, be on time, and stay for the entire class. Late arrival, early departure, ringing cell phones, texting, tweetting, surfing, newspaper reading, sleeping, etc. distract and disrupt the entire class.  Your courtesy is necessary and appreciated.  Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259 http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.  Students seeking assistance with writing may wish to contact The Undergraduate Writing Center http://uwc.utexas.edu/.  Medical assistance/ counseling services are available at http://www.cmhc.utexas.edu/.

GRADES

 Grading will be determined on the basis of individual quiz grades (25%), team project grades (15%), peer evaluation (5%), two midterms (10 and 15% respectively), and one final exam (30%).  Plus and minus grading will be used. You must take both midterms and the final exam to pass the course. The final is scheduled for Monday, December 13, 9:00-12:00 noon, location to be announced.  Make any plans for winter break with this date in mind.  Please do not ask for an exception.  EXAM ABSENCE. Taking a midterm or final exam other than on the date scheduled will be allowed without penalty only in the instance of a valid, officially documented medical infirmity, or an absence from Austin on official and documented university business.  In each case, clear, written evidence of such a situation must be presented, preferably before the missed day.  Any makeup exam will be given at the professor’s convenience. Missing a quiz or other assignments is discussed in the Course Sequence, which is available on the course website. http://laits.utexas.edu/sites/history2point0

 

This course partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39420 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WEL 2.312
show description

THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1865

This class will survey over 150 years of modern American history, keeping a collective mind open about which and why certain facts, stories, events, and people are key to understanding our past.   It draws on two popular American history books that offer complementary, sometimes conflicting, interpretations of the American story to illuminate the rich textures of the nation’s history as well as the particular challenges faced in its writing. Using these authorities (as well as the basic Outline of U.S. History) as a starting point, participants will work collaboratively to expand their understanding of American history and to engage in the type of thinking required to understand and “do” history.   

 

REQUIRED  U.S. Government,  Outline of U.S. History, chs. 8-15.    http://www.america.gov/publications/books/history-outline.html

Johnson, History of the American PeopleZinn, A People’s History of the United States

 iClicker,  available at Coop

Additional readings, available as posted on class website.     http://laits.utexas.edu/sites/history2point0/

Professor  Penne Restad                         restad@mail.utexas.edu

GAR 2.144                                    475-7233

Office hours:                                 T/Th 2-3:30 p 

Teaching Assistant

 Michael Sagely                                    msagely@mail.utexas.edu

Hours and place to be announced.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Students will be able to-construct a basic, meaningful, and intellectually honest narrative America's history from late 19th century to the present-execute a basic set of moves that constitute historical thinking-comprehend, ponder, and write about key ideas, events, concepts, and interpretations relating to the history of the period

CIVILITY, EXAMINATIONS, GRADING, ABSENCES, ETC. 

Messages, course revisions, study guides, etc. will be posted on history2.0/Resources. No hard copy will be distributed.

You are expected to attend each class, be on time, and stay for the entire class. Late arrival, early departure, ringing cell phones, texting, tweetting, surfing, newspaper reading, sleeping, etc. distract and disrupt the entire class.  Your courtesy is necessary and appreciated.  Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259 http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.  Students seeking assistance with writing may wish to contact The Undergraduate Writing Center http://uwc.utexas.edu/.  Medical assistance/ counseling services are available at http://www.cmhc.utexas.edu/.

 

GRADES.  Grading will be determined on the basis of individual quiz grades (25%), team project grades (15%), peer evaluation (5%), two midterms (10 and 15% respectively), and one final exam (30%).  Plus and minus grading will be used. You must take both midterms and the final exam to pass the course. The final is scheduled for Monday, December 13, 9:00-12:00 noon, location to be announced.  Make any plans for winter break with this date in mind.  Please do not ask for an exception.  EXAM ABSENCE. Taking a midterm or final exam other than on the date scheduled will be allowed without penalty only in the instance of a valid, officially documented medical infirmity, or an absence from Austin on official and documented university business.  In each case, clear, written evidence of such a situation must be presented, preferably before the missed day.  Any makeup exam will be given at the professor’s convenience. Missing a quiz or other assignments is discussed in the Course Sequence, which is available on the course website. http://laits.utexas.edu/sites/history2point0

 

 

HIS 350R • Hist Of Teaching American Hist

39720 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.118
show description

Historians are experts. They uncover and collect facts, and with them construct the explanations and narratives about the past. They also seek to understand our relationship to that past, and to impart that knowledge to others. Yet, in a society that quite correctly expects education to serve useful purposes, the functions of historical study and the teacher of history can seem difficult to explain. The "products" of true historical study seems less tangible and immediate than those that stem from some other disciplines. Easy access to the "facts" and to simple narratives on Wikipedia and Google have further complicated the problem. If history is, as many see it, a collection of facts arranged in chronological order, we can all be e-historians. This is a patently false notion of course, but it does reflect a way in which present conditions shape the way we look at the past. Each age has conceived of the importance of knowing history in different ways and takes different lessons and meanings from its study. This seminar will examine and evaluate the role of the historian and teacher of history today and changing ideas of how American history has been taught. A portion of class time will be spent in a seminar setting and a significant part will be spent as observer-participants in an American history survey course.

Grading

Participation and attendance, 20%; Journal 40%; Two papers, 40%.

Texts

Participants will read selections from a wide variety of authors that reveal changing cultural perspectives on what an informed citizen should know about the nation's history. These include writers such as Barzun, Teacher in America: Wineburg, Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts, Calder, "Uncoverage: Toward a Signature Pedagogy for the History Survey;" Trinkle and Merriman, eds., History.Edu: Essays on Teaching with Technology; Finkel, Teaching with Your Mouth Shut: Ravitch, The Great School Wars; Cremin, The Genius of American Education, Ward, History in the Making; and Wayland, How to Teach American History.

This course contains a Writing flag.

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

39085 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 3.102
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

This course contains a Cultural Diversity flag.

HIS 350R • Hist Of Teaching American Hist

39320 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ B0.302
show description

Historians are experts. They uncover and collect facts, and with them construct the explanations and narratives about the past. They also seek to understand our relationship to that past, and to impart that knowledge to others. Yet, in a society that quite correctly expects education to serve useful purposes, the functions of historical study and the teacher of history can seem difficult to explain. The "products" of true historical study seems less tangible and immediate than those that stem from some other disciplines. Easy access to the "facts" and to simple narratives on Wikipedia and Google have further complicated the problem. If history is, as many see it, a collection of facts arranged in chronological order, we can all be e-historians. This is a patently false notion of course, but it does reflect a way in which present conditions shape the way we look at the past. Each age has conceived of the importance of knowing history in different ways and takes different lessons and meanings from its study. This seminar will examine and evaluate the role of the historian and teacher of history today and changing ideas of how American history has been taught. A portion of class time will be spent in a seminar setting and a significant part will be spent as observer-participants in an American history survey course.

Grading

Participation and attendance, 20%; Journal 40%; Two papers, 40%.

Texts

Participants will read selections from a wide variety of authors that reveal changing cultural perspectives on what an informed citizen should know about the nation's history. These include writers such as Barzun, Teacher in America: Wineburg, Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts, Calder, "Uncoverage: Toward a Signature Pedagogy for the History Survey;" Trinkle and Merriman, eds., History.Edu: Essays on Teaching with Technology; Finkel, Teaching with Your Mouth Shut: Ravitch, The Great School Wars; Cremin, The Genius of American Education, Ward, History in the Making; and Wayland, How to Teach American History.

This course contains a Writing flag.

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

39420 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ B0.306
show description

HIS 315L

TTH 3:30-5:00p  MEZ B0.306

Dr. Restad

THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1865


This class will survey over 150 years of modern American history, keeping a collective mind open about which and why certain facts, stories, events, and people are key to understanding our past.   It uses two popular American history books that offer complementary, sometimes conflicting, interpretations of the American story to illuminate the rich textures of American history as well as the particular challenges faced in writing a national history. Using these authorities as a starting point, participants will work collaboratively to expand their understanding of American history and to engage in the type of thinking required to “do” history.   

REQUIRED   

Johnson, History of the American People

Zinn, A People’s History of the United States

iClicker,  available at Coop

Additional readings, available as posted on class website.

     http://laits.utexas.edu/sites/history2point0/

Professor

Penne Restad                      restad@mail.utexas.edu

GAR 2.144                             475-7233

Office hours:                         MW  12-1a; W 3-4p

Teaching Assistants

Aaron Reynolds

Rebecca Onion

TAs offices, office hours, and email addresses are on the course website.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

 Students will be able to

-construct a basic, meaningful, and intellectually honest narrative America's history from late 19th century to the present

-execute a basic set of moves that constitute historical thinking

-comprehend, ponder, and write about key ideas, events, concepts, and interpretations relating to the history of the period

CIVILITY, EXAMINATIONS, GRADING, ABSENCES, ETC. 

Messages, course revisions, study guides, etc. will be posted on the course website. No hard copy will be distributed. http://laits.utexas.edu/sites/history2point0/

You are expected to attend each class, be on time, and stay for the entire class. Late arrival, early departure, ringing cell phones, texting, twitting, surfing, newspaper reading, sleeping, etc. distract and disrupt the entire class.  Your courtesy is necessary and appreciated.  Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities,  471-6259. Students seeking assistance with writing may wish to contact The Undergraduate Writing Center http://uwc.utexas.edu/handouts.  Medical assistance/ counseling services are available at http://www.cmhc.utexas.edu/.

GRADES.  Grading will be determined on the basis of individual quiz grades (25%), team project grades (20%), peer evaluation (5%), two midterms (10 and 15% respectively), and one final exam (25%).  (These percentages are close approximations.  See course site/ resources/rubrics/grading for exact point breakdown.)  Plus and minus grading will be used. You must take both midterms and the final exam to pass the course. The final is scheduled for Tuesday, May 18, 9:00–12:00 noon, location to be announced.  Make any plans for summer break with this date in mind.  Please do not ask for an exception.   EXAM ABSENCE. Taking a midterm exam other than on the date scheduled will be allowed without penalty only in the instance of a valid, officially documented medical infirmity, or an absence from Austin on official and documented university business.  In each case, clear, written evidence of such a situation must be presented, preferably before the missed day.  Any makeup exam will be given at the professor’s convenience.

SCHEDULE OF CLASS MEETINGS

& ASSIGNMENTS


WEEK/ READING

Reading assignments and any additional preparations are to be completed before coming to class on the date they are listed. Team work will be done only during class time. Supplemental readings and directions are posted on the course website.  Lectures, readings, and team assignments complement and inform each other.  One is not a substitute for the other. Exams will cover all material:  lecture, all readings, discussions, etc.  This syllabus is a general guideline; the sequence, topics, and dates are subject to change. Check the course website frequently. http://laits.utexas.edu/sites/history2point0

WEEK  I                  Jan 19

T               Introduction

Th            The Narrative of History   

WEEK  II                  Jan 26          

UNIT 1.  THE LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY

READ: Johnson, chapter 5;  Zinn, chapters 11, 12.  A reading guide for this assignment, as well as all subsequent assignments from these two books, is available on the course website.

T               Lecture:  The Gilded Age and Imperialism

Th            Quizzes:  Individual and Team

NOTE:  To help you adjust to the format and pace of this course, Quizzes came after Lecture—this unit only.  In each of the subsequent units, Quizzes will be given on the FIRST day of the unit, with a lecture to follow the next day.  Keep this in mind as you set aside time to read the two texts and prepare for Quizzes.

WEEK III                  Feb 2

T               Part 1.1 The Industrialists

Th            Part 1.2:  Social Structures

WEEK IV                Feb. 9

T               Part 1.3: Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism

UNIT 2.  THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY

READ: Johnson, chapters 5 (pp.614-622); 6; Zinn, chapters 13, 14. Read Zinn 13 first, as he deals with the Progressive era.  Johnson concentrates more on Wilson (in the late Progressive era), and looks at the enhanced role of the government.

Th            Quizzes:  Individual and Team

WEEK  V                Feb 16

T               Lecture:   Progress, War, and the Future of America

Th            Part 1.1:  The Progressives

WEEK VI                Feb 23

T               Part 2.2:  Immigration and Perfection

Th            Part 2.3:  The New Generation

WEEK VII               Mar 2     

T               FIRST MIDTERM EXAM

UNIT 3.  THE NEW DEAL AND WORLD WAR II

                  READ: Johnson, chapter 7 (to p. 790);  Zinn, chapters 15 (p. 386 to end); 16 (to p. 426)

Th            Quizzes:  Individual and Team

WEEK VIII              Mar 9

T                Lecture:   Big Changes and New Roles

Th             No class

WEEK  IX    SPRING BREAK

WEEK  X                Mar 23

T               Part 3.1   The New Deal

Th            Part 3.2:  The Dust Bowl

WEEK  XI               Mar 30

T               Part 3.3: The Home Front

Th            SECOND MIDTERM EXAM

WEEK  XII              Apr 6     

UNIT 4: THE COLD WAR, THE1950s, AND JFK

            Read: Johnson, chapter 7 (begin p. 790), 8 (to p. 867);  Zinn, chapters 16 (begin p. 426), and 17.

T               Quizzes:  Individual and Team

Th            Lecture:  Fears and Realities in Postwar America

WEEK  XIII             Apr 13

T               Part 4.1:  The Soviet Threat

Th            Part 4.2:  Consumer Culture in the 1950s

WEEK  XIV            Apr 20

T               Part 4.3: An Emerging Critique

UNIT 5:  FROM LBJ THROUGH THE REAGAN ERA

                  Read: Johnson, chapter 8; Zinn, chapters 17 (p. 458-end), 18-21.

Th            Quizzes:  Individual and Team

WEEK  XV             Apr 27

T               Lecture:  The Turn from Liberalism to Conservatism

Th            Part 5.1:  Richard Nixon

WEEK  XVI            May 4

T               Part 5.2: The Crisis of Confidence

Th            Part 5.3:  Culture Wars

May 18 FINAL EXAM TUESDAY. 9:00–12:00 noon. Location to be announced.

The syllabus, lectures, and exams that comprise this course are the property of P. Restad and are for the exclusive use of those enrolled in this specific class for use in this specific class.  They may not be reproduced or summarized in any form, including electronically, partially or in full, without the professor’s express, written permission. ­­­­ 

 

HIS 350L • Hist Of Teaching Amer Hist-W

39625 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 128
show description

Dr. Restad 

HIS 350L /39625

A History of Teaching American History


Historians narrate, interpret, and try to understand our relationship to the past.  Not only facts, but causality, complexity, context, contingency, change-over-time, and meaning are all requisite components of the craft. In our practical society, history's "use" can seem difficult to explain, its applications less tangible and immediate than those that stem from some other disciplines. Yet, the history class, a foundational part of a good education, has been valued as essential to creating good citizens and well-rounded scholars.  It has provided models of heroic —and villainous—acts, and served as a wellspring of lessons and cautions. All of these “uses” -- so intimately linked to our sense of national identity –make the history classroom a rich forum for intellectual inquiry and cultural discourse. This seminar will examine the challenging and changing role of historians and teachers of history as authorities guiding students toward a deeper knowledge of the American past. A portion of class time will be spent in a seminar setting and part will be spent as observer-participants in an American history survey course. 

Time and Place

Th    12:30-2:00p. Burdine 128. 

T/Th 3:30-5:00p.   Mezes B0.306 (required)

Instruction

Professor

Penne Restad                      restad@mail.utexas.edu

GAR 2.144                             475-7233

Office hours:                         MW  12-1a; W 3-4p

Dr. Michael Sweet              msweet@mail.utexas.edu

Faculty Development Specialist, DIIA

Rebecca Onion                   rebeccaonion@gmail.com

Doctoral Candidate,  American Studies

WEBSITE

http://sites.la.utexas.edu/history2point0/

REQUIRED   

FitzGerald, America Revised. (out of print, available used from Amazon, or locate the three-part article, “Rewriting American History,” published in The New Yorker, February 26, 1979; March 05, 1979: March 12, 1979)

Additional readings, available as posted on class website

For participation in His 315L:

Johnson, History of the American People

Zinn, A People’s History of the United States

Additional readings, available as posted on class website

CIVILITY, GRADING, ETC.

Messages, course revisions, study guides, etc. will be posted on the course website. No hard

copy will be distributed.  Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. Students seeking assistance with writing may wish to contact The Undergraduate Writing Center http://uwc.utexas.edu/handouts.  Information concerning medical assistance/ counseling services are available at http://www.cmhc.utexas.edu/.

CLASS MEETINGS.  The seminar will meet on Thursdays, 12:30-2:00p. Burdine 128.  You are also expected to attend His315L, U.S. since 1865 (39420), which meets TTh in Mezes, 3:30-5:00p. BO.306, according to a schedule, which will be created when the seminar meets.  This is a required component of the seminar grade. Late arrival, early departure, ringing cell phones, texting, twitting, surfing, newspaper reading, talking, sleeping, etc. distract and disrupt the entire class.  Your courtesy is necessary and appreciated. 

GRADES.   Participation and attendance, 20%; Journal 40%;  Two papers, 40%.  Rubrics for all written work are posted on the course website.  “Participation” criteria will be determined by the class.

SCHEDULE OF CLASS MEETINGS

& READING ASSIGNMENTS


Reading assignments and any additional preparation are to be completed before coming to class on the date they are listed. Some assignments refer to His 315L, which meets twice weekly. A companion syllabus for that class is available on the course website. This syllabus is a general guideline; the sequence, topics, and dates are subject to change. Check the course website frequently.

WEEK I                  Jan 19

                  Th            Introduction

WEEK  II                 Jan 26

T               Attend 315—applies to all Tuesday sessions

Th            Discussion:  The Purpose of Teaching History

                  Attend 315 –applies to all Thursday sessions

Note.  Students are required to attend TTh sessions of His 315L.  Exceptions will be noted in a schedule we will create at the beginning of the course. 

WEEK III                 Feb 2

                  Th            Facilitation workshop, conducted by Dr. Sweet.

WEEK IV                Feb. 9

                  Th            Discussion: 315 in context

WEEK  V                Feb 16  

                  Th            Two Old Textbooks:  The history text as primary document

WEEK VI                Feb 23

                  Th            Fitzgerald,  “Past Masters,” in America Revised  

WEEK VII               Mar 2

                  Th            Fitzgerald, “Continuity and Change,” in America Revised

Schedule individual meetings to discuss Paper # 1.  

WEEK VIII             Mar 9

                  Th            Fitzgerald, “Progressives, Fundamentalists, and Mandarins, “ in America                                      Revised

WEEK  IX               SPRING BREAK

WEEK  X                Mar 23

                  Th            Discussion:  Connections between 315 and 350 course readings

                  F               DUE:  Paper # 1.

WEEK  XI               Mar 30

                  Th            Cheney, "The End of History," Wall Street Journal (Oct. 20, 1994)

                                    Nash, “Ch. 1: Culture Wars and the Teaching of the Past,” History on Trial, NY,                                                             1997.

                                    Wilentz, Review of Nash, History on Trial,  New York Times Book Review,                                                                         Nov. 30, 1997.

 WEEK  XII             Apr 6

                  Th            Discussion:  The Role of the Teacher in the Classroom,  conducted by Ms Onion

WEEK  XIII             Apr 13  

                  Th            Sturken, Marita, “Reenactment, Fantasy, and the Paranoia of History,” History                                          and Theory, 36: 1997.

                                    Jefferson “Whose War Is It Anyway?  Ken Burns, The War and American Popular                                        Memory,” Oral History Rev. 2009:  71-81.

                                    Anderson, “History and Popular Memory,” in Edgerton and Rollins, ed.                                                                              Television Histories, Lexington, KY, 2001:  19-36.

WEEK  XIV            Apr 20

                  Th            Rosenzweig, “How Americans Use and Think about the Past,” in Seixas,                                                                           Knowing, Teaching, and Learning, NY: 2000:  262-83.

                                    Wineburg, Knowing, “Making Historical Sense,” 306-27.

                  F               DUE:  First 3 pages of final paper.

WEEK  XV             Apr 27

                  Th            Oral Presentations   

WEEK  XVI            May 4

                  Th            Oral Presentations

F               DUE :  Paper # 2, Friday, May 7, by 5 pm, GAR 2.144.   Turn in hard copy of journal entries (with professor comments),  Paper # 1 (graded copy),  Paper #2  and Rough Draft (with comments).

The syllabus, lectures, and exams that comprise this course are the property of P. Restad and are for the exclusive use of those enrolled in this specific class for use in this specific class.  They may not be reproduced or summarized in any form, including electronically, partially or in full, without the professor’s express, written permission. ­­­­

 

 

HIS 350L • Myth/Construc Of Am Ident-W

40090 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 400pm-530pm CBA 4.340
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

84770 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 830-1000 GAR 0.102
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

38895 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 WEL 2.122
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865-Hon

38915 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 900-1000 GAR 2.128
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 350L • Myth/Construc Of Am Ident-W

39190 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 400pm-530pm GAR 2.112
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

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