Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
history masthead
Alan Tully, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Megan Seaholm

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., 1988, Rice University

Megan Seaholm

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7243
  • Office: GAR 4.124
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: WF 2:30-5:30 p.m. & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Courses taught

Professor Seaholm's teaching fields are late-19th and 20th century U.S. social and cultural history and U.S. women's history. Main area of interest is history of women's health care and the social construction of medical science and medical practice.

HIS 315L  US History from Reconstruction to the Present

HIS 315K  US History:  pre-columbus through the Civil War

HIS 350R:  Women, Health and Medicine in American History

HIS 350R:  The History of Feminism in the U.S.

HIS 320R:  Texas History:  1914-Present

 

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39340-39380 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 200pm-300pm UTC 2.112A
show description

Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with asurvey of US history from Reconstruction to 2000. As such, students will study significant aspects of thenation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how,  and so what  of this history. Students begin with learning about what happened and then proceed toquestions of causality and consequence.Moving from what happened  to why or how , and, then, to so what  students will sharpen their skillsin critical thinking.  Both exams will include essay questions to encourage students in their writtencommunication skills . Along the way, students will consider some of ethical dilemmas confronted byAmericans who lived long ago. Students will examine issues of personal responsibility  and socialresponsibility  as they learn about how previous generations understood these responsibilities.

 

Texts:

 • Selected articles or documents posted on Bb.

 

 • Of the People: A History of the United States, vol. 2, concise edition, By James Oakes, et. al.2010, 2011, or 2012 editions are acceptable.

 

 • Voices of Freedom, 3rd Edition, vol. 2, edited by Eric Foner

 

 • The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society, and Politics, by BruceSchulman

 

 • Articles and documents about Ethics and particular ethical issues, posted on Bb.

 

Grading:

1st Midterm Exam 18.5% course grade

 

2nd Midterm Exam18.5% course grade

Ethical Reasoning discussions and assignments; 33% course grade (see last page)

 

• Reflections on Ethics Journal, 8%

 

• Essay on Ethical Issue, 15%

 

• Participation in Friday discussion groups, 10%

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39385-39430 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 300pm-400pm UTC 2.112A
show description

Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with asurvey of US history from Reconstruction to 2000. As such, students will study significant aspects of thenation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how,  and so what  of this history. Students begin with learning about what happened and then proceed toquestions of causality and consequence.Moving from what happened  to why or how , and, then, to so what  students will sharpen their skillsin critical thinking.  Both exams will include essay questions to encourage students in their writtencommunication skills . Along the way, students will consider some of ethical dilemmas confronted byAmericans who lived long ago. Students will examine issues of personal responsibility  and socialresponsibility  as they learn about how previous generations understood these responsibilities.

 

Texts:

 • Selected articles or documents posted on Bb.

 

 • Of the People: A History of the United States, vol. 2, concise edition, By James Oakes, et. al.2010, 2011, or 2012 editions are acceptable.

 

 • Voices of Freedom, 3rd Edition, vol. 2, edited by Eric Foner

 

 • The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society, and Politics, by BruceSchulman

 

 • Articles and documents about Ethics and particular ethical issues, posted on Bb.

 

Grading:

1st Midterm Exam 18.5% course grade

 

2nd Midterm Exam18.5% course grade

Ethical Reasoning discussions and assignments; 33% course grade (see last page)

 

• Reflections on Ethics Journal, 8%

 

• Essay on Ethical Issue, 15%

 

• Participation in Friday discussion groups, 10%

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39685 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 2.112A
show description

Lectures, readings, videos, maps and other graphics are used to provide students with a survey of US history from before the European encounter through the Civil War.  Students will study significant aspects of the nation’s political, economic, and cultural history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  You begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequences.

Texts:

James Henretta, et. al., America:  A Concise History, 3rd ed.

Toni Morrison, A Mercy

Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers:  The Revolutionary Generation

Nancy Cott, The Bonds of Womanhood:  Woman’s Sphere in New England,1780-1835  Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Grading:

Two, in-class, 50 minute exams, each worth 30 points

One final exam worth 40 points

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39690 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WEL 1.308
show description

Lectures, readings, videos, maps and other graphics are used to provide students with a survey of US history from before the European encounter through the Civil War.  Students will study significant aspects of the nation’s political, economic, and cultural history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  You begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequences.

Texts:

James Henretta, et. al., America:  A Concise History, 3rd ed.

Toni Morrison, A Mercy

Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers:  The Revolutionary Generation

Nancy Cott, The Bonds of Womanhood:  Woman’s Sphere in New England,1780-1835   

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Grading:

Two, in-class, 50 minute exams, each worth 30 points

One final exam worth 40 points

HIS 350R • Hist Of American Feminism

39985 • Spring 2014
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

This upper-division seminar class will investigate various aspects and/or movements of feminism in the United States.  Although we will look at issues of women’s equality in the colonial period, we will spend most of our time studying 19th and 20th century feminist or female advocacy activity including women in the anti-slavery movement, mid-19th century women’s rights advocates, the 19th and early 20th century woman suffrage movement, late 19th century women’s advocacy groups like the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, post World War II women’s rights activism and the Women’s Liberation Movement, as well as what is being tentatively called “Third Wave Feminism.”

        Students will be expected to read several book length publications over the course of the semester, and students will be expected to participate in weekly class discussion.

Texts:

•  Christine Stansell, The Feminist Promise: 1792 to the Present (Random House, 2010).

•  Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women’s Movement ChangedAmerica (Penguin Press, 2000).

•  Bell Hooks, Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center (South End Press, 2000)

•  Course Packet

Grading:

• 60% of course grade based on weighted average of writing assignments.

• 40% of course grade based on class participation. Class participation is evaluated onbasis of participation in class discussion and performance on, occasional, in-class essays.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39642-39652 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm WEL 1.308
show description

Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with asurvey of US history from Reconstruction to 2000. As such, students will study significant aspects of thenation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why ,how,  and so what  of this history. Students begin with learning about what happened and then proceed toquestions of causality and consequence.Moving from what happened  to why or how , and, then, to so what  students will sharpen their skillsin critical thinking.  Both exams will include essay questions to encourage students in their writtencommunication skills . Along the way, students will consider some of ethical dilemmas confronted byAmericans who lived long ago. Students will examine issues of personal responsibility  and socialresponsibility  as they learn about how previous generations understood these responsibilities.

Texts:

 • Selected articles or documents posted on Bb.

 • Of the People: A History of the United States, vol. 2, concise edition, By James Oakes, et. al.2010, 2011, or 2012 editions are acceptable.

 • Voices of Freedom, 3rd Edition, vol. 2, edited by Eric Foner

 • The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society, and Politics, by BruceSchulman

 • Articles and documents about Ethics and particular ethical issues, posted on Bb.

Grading:

1st Midterm Exam, Monday 2/18/13 Essay question; 18.5% course grade

2nd Midterm Exam, Monday, 4/8/13, Short answer questions; 18.5% course gradeEthical Reasoning discussions and assignments; 33% course grade (see last page)

• Reflections on Ethics Journal, 8%

• Essay on Ethical Issue, 15%

• Participation in Friday discussion groups, 10%

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39653 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 2.102A
show description

Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with a survey of US history from Reconstruction to 2000.  As such, students will study significant aspects of the nation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  Students begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequence.

 

Texts:

• America:  A Concise History, vol. 2, 4th edition by James Henretta, et. al.

• Reading the American Past:  Selected Historical Documents, vol. 2, From 1865, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

• The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair.

• The Seventies by Bruce Schulman.

• Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace, by Robert A. Divine.  Optional but recommended.

• The Constitution of the United States (see appendix of Henretta text)

 

Grading:

Exams:  There will be 4 exams

• 1st Midterm Exam, 25%, essay and short answer questions

• 2nd Midterm Exam, 20%, multiple choice,

• 3rd Midterm Exam, 25%, essay and short answer questions

• Final Exam, 30%, essay, short answer questions, multiple choice

HIS 350R • Women In Sickness & Health

39900 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 310
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

In this seminar students will explore the experience of American women, in sickness and in health.  Students will learn about medical and biological views of woman and women’s health, the social context of those views, the development of medical practices and, indeed, a new medical specialty, for the treatment of illness and debility. This study of American women focuses on the 19th and 20th century and looks at the experience of Native-American women, African-American women, Latinas, working class women, and white middle- and upper-class women.  Health topics include menarche and menstruation, childbirth, birth control and abortion, gynecological disorders and reproductive organ cancers, as well as mental health and mental illness.

Texts:

• Judith Walzer Leavitt,  Women and Health in American, 2nd ed.,  University of Wisconsin Press, 1999.

• Tina Cassidy, Birth: The Surprising History of How We Are Born.  Grove Press, 2006

• Marie Jenkins Schwartz, Birthing a Slave:  Motherhood and Medicine in the Antebellum South.  Harvard University Press, 2006.

• Sarah Stage, Female Complaints:  Lydia Pinkham and the Business of Women’s Medicine.  W.W. Norton & Co., 1979.

• Andrea Tone, Devices and Desires:  A History of Contraceptives in America.  Hill & Wang,  2001.

• Jael Silliman, et. al, Undivided Rights:  Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice.  South End Press,  2004.

• Barron H. Lerner, M.D.  The Breast Cancer Wars:  Fear, Hope, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America.  Oxford University Press, 2001

Grading:

Class participation = 30% of course grade

Writing assignments = 70% of course grade

Three 3-5 page essays = 14% each; for total of 42% of course grade;

8-10 page essay = 28% of course grade

HIS F315L • The United States Since 1865

85270 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm WEL 2.122
show description

Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with a survey of US history from Reconstruction to 2000.  As such, students will study significant aspects of the nation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  Students begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequence.

Texts:

• America:  A Concise History, vol. 2, 4th edition by James Henretta, et. al.

• Reading the American Past:  Selected Historical Documents, vol. 2, From 1865, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

• The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair.

• The Seventies by Bruce Schulman.

• Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace, by Robert A. Divine.  Optional but recommended.

• The Constitution of the United States (see appendix of Henretta text)

 

Grading:

• 1st Midterm Exam, 25%, essay and short answer questions

• 2nd Midterm Exam, 20%, multiple choice,

• 3rd Midterm Exam, 25%, essay and short answer questions

• Final Exam, 30%, essay, short answer questions, multiple choice

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39345 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 1.308
show description

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with a survey of US history from Reconstruction to 2000.  As such, students will study significant aspects of the nation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the whyhow, and so what of this history.  Students begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequence.

     In addition, this course carries the Ethics and Leadership flag.  This means that as students learn about modern US history, they will also be introduced to concepts of ethical reasoning.  This is not about a particular ethical or moral system.  Rather, ethical reasoning has to do with how one makes decision within one’s own value-system.

 

Assigned Reading: a concise edition textbook, one novel, two collections of primary sources, and 1 other book.

  • America:  A Concise History, vol. 2, 4th edition by James Henretta, et. al.
  • Voices of Freedom:  A Documentary History, vol. 2, 3rd edition,  Eric Foner, ed.
  • The Era of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1933-1945, by Richard Polenberg
  • The Seventies by Bruce Schulman.
  • Course Packet

 

Grades and Assignments:

All students will be required to attend two seminars to discuss ethical issues or debates of the past.  These seminars will not be held during class time.  They will, however, be scheduled on a variety of different days and times throughout the semester to accommodate different student schedules.  Attendance at these seminars and completion of a short assignment at the end of the seminar will count as 20% of the course grade.

HIS 350R • Women In Sickness And Health

39585 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 330pm-630pm SZB 296
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

    In this seminar students will explore the experience of American women, in sickness and in health.  Students will learn about medical and biological views of woman and women’s health, the social context of those views, the development of medical practices and, indeed, a new medical specialty, for the treatment of illness and debility.

HIS 315K • The United States, 1492-1865

39160 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JES A121A
show description

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps and other graphics are used to provide students with a survey of US history from before the European encounter through the Civil War.  Students will study significant aspects of the nation’s political, economic, and cultural history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  You begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequences.

 

Required Reading:

         James Henretta, et. al., America:  A Concise History, 3rd ed.  OR

            Toni Morrison, A Mercy

         Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers:  The Revolutionary Generation

Nancy Cott, The Bonds of Womanhood:  Woman’s Sphere in New England,

       1780-1835  

         Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

 

Exams:

    Two, in-class, 50 minute exams, each worth 30 points

     One final exam worth 40 points

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39187 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WEL 1.308
show description

Course DescriptionLectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with a survey of US history from Reconstruction to 2000.  As such, students will study significant aspects of the nation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  Students begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequence.

     In addition, this course carries the Ethics and Leadership flag.  This means that as students learn about modern US history, they will also be introduced to concepts of ethical reasoning.  This is not about a particular ethical or moral system.  Rather, ethical reasoning has to do with how one makes decision within one’s own value-system.

 

Assigned Reading: a concise edition textbook, one novel, two collections of primary sources, and 1 other book.

  • America:  A Concise History, vol. 2, 4th edition by James Henretta, et. al.
  • Voices of Freedom:  A Documentary History, vol. 2, 3rd edition,  Eric Foner, ed.
  • The Era of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1933-1945, by Richard Polenberg
  • The Seventies by Bruce Schulman.
  • Course Packet

 

Grades and Assignments:

  • Two mid-term exams—each worth 25% of course grade [Both exams will include one question that asks student to consider ethical dimensions of particular decisions or issues.  33% of test grade or 8% of course grade].
  • Two one-page essays, written in class, that identify the ethical issues of a particular episode in US history—10% course grade, each.
  • Final Exam, 30% of course grade.

HIS 350R • History Of American Feminism

39435 • Fall 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm PAR 302
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

This upper-division seminar class will investigate various aspects and/or movements of feminism in the United States.  Although we will look at issues of women’s equality in the colonial period, we will spend most of our time studying 19th and 20th century feminist or female advocacy activity including women in the anti-slavery movement, mid-19th century women’s rights advocates, the 19th and early 20th century woman suffrage movement, late 19th century women’s advocacy groups like the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, post World War II women’s rights activism and the Women’s Liberation Movement, as well as what is being tentatively called “Third Wave Feminism.” 

        Students will be expected to read several book length publications over the course of the semester, and students will be expected to participate in weekly class discussion.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39200 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 1.308
show description

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with a survey of US history from Reconstruction to 2000.  As such, students will study significant aspects of the nation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  Students begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequence.

 

Assigned Reading:  a concise edition textbook, a collection of primary sources, and 2 other books. 

America:  A Concise History, vol. 2, 4th edition by James Henretta, et. al.

Reading the American Past:  Selected Historical Documents, vol. 2, From 1865, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair.

The Seventies by Bruce Schulman.

Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace, by Robert A. Divine.  Optional but recommended.

The Constitution of the United States (see appendix of Henretta text)

 

Exams:  There will be 4 exams

• 1st Midterm Exam, 25%, essay and short answer questions

• 2nd Midterm Exam, 20%, multiple choice,

• 3rd Midterm Exam, 25%, essay and short answer questions

• Final Exam, 30%, essay, short answer questions, multiple choice

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39205 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 1.308
show description

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with a survey of US history from Reconstruction to 2000.  As such, students will study significant aspects of the nation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  Students begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequence.

 

Assigned Reading:  a concise edition textbook, a collection of primary sources, and 2 other books. 

America:  A Concise History, vol. 2, 4th edition by James Henretta, et. al.

Reading the American Past:  Selected Historical Documents, vol. 2, From 1865, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair.

The Seventies by Bruce Schulman.

Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace, by Robert A. Divine.  Optional but recommended.

The Constitution of the United States (see appendix of Henretta text)

 

Exams:  There will be 4 exams

• 1st Midterm Exam, 25%, essay and short answer questions

• 2nd Midterm Exam, 20%, multiple choice,

• 3rd Midterm Exam, 25%, essay and short answer questions

• Final Exam, 30%, essay, short answer questions, multiple choice

HIS 350R • History Of American Feminism

39410 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

This upper-division seminar class will investigate various aspects and/or movements of feminism in the United States.  Although we will look at issues of women’s equality in the colonial period, we will spend most of our time studying 19th and 20th century feminist or female advocacy activity including women in the anti-slavery movement, mid-19th century women’s rights advocates, the 19th and early 20th century woman suffrage movement, late 19th century women’s advocacy groups like the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, post World War II women’s rights activism and the Women’s Liberation Movement, as well as what is being tentatively called “Third Wave Feminism.”  

        Students will be expected to read several book length publications over the course of the semester, and students will be expected to participate in weekly class discussion.

 

Grading:

60% of course grade based on weighted average of writing assignments.

40% of course grade based on class participation.  Class participation is evaluated on basis of participation in class discussion and performance on in-class essays.

Writing Assignments for HIS 350R:  The History of American Feminism

Students will be expected to write five essays.

One essay (1-2) pages and the first assignment of the course) will be a personal statement:  “What I know, or believe, about the History of Feminism in the United States.”

Two essays (2-3 pages each) will be critical book reviews of assigned reading.

One essay (2-3 pages) will be a critical book review of a book-length monograph chosen by each student from a list provided with the syllabus.

One essay (7-10 pages) will be a research paper on an aspect, or episode, of the history of American feminism.  A list of possible topics will be provided with the syllabus.

Each class will begin with a 5 minute essay about the reading assigned for that class. Students will write in response to a prompt provided by Dr. Seaholm.  Students will exchange these short essays with a classmate, and each will comment on the clarity of the other’s writing.

Each student will meet with Dr. Seaholm at least twice during the semester to

discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the student’s writing.   

Students will bring print copies of the third writing assignment to class for peer review.  Students will read each other’s work and make comments.  With this feedback, students are encouraged to make revisions before turning in the completed assignment at the next class.

 

Required Reading:

Christine Stansell, The Feminist Promise:  1792 to the Present (Random House, 2010).

Kathryn Kish Sklar, Women’s Rights Emerges within the Antislavery Movement, 1830-1970:  A History with Documents (Bedford St. Martin’s, 2000).

Aileen S. Kraditor, The Ideas of the Woman Suffrage Movement: 1890-1920 (Columbia University Press, 1965).

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Women and Economics:  A study of the economic relation between men and women as a factor in social evolution (G.P Putnam, 1920).

Nancy Cott, The Grounding of Modern Feminism (Yale University Press, 1989).

Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique (W.W. Norton, 1997 edition, or earlier edition).

Linda Nicholson, ed., The Second Wave:  A Reader in Feminist Theory (Routledge, 1997).

Course Packet:  collection of additional primary sources.

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39155 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WEL 1.308
show description

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with a survey of US history from Reconstruction to 2000.  As such, students will study significant aspects of the nation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  Students begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequence.

 

Assigned Reading:  a concise edition textbook, a collection of primary sources, and 2 other books. 

America:  A Concise History, vol. 2, 4th edition by James Henretta, et. al.

Reading the American Past:  Selected Historical Documents, vol. 2, From 1865, ed. by Michael P. Johnson

The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair.

The Seventies by Bruce Schulman.

Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace, by Robert A. Divine.  Optional but recommended.

The Constitution of the United States (see appendix of Henretta text)

 

Exams:  There will be 4 exams

• 1st Midterm Exam, 25%, essay and short answer questions

• 2nd Midterm Exam, 20%, multiple choice,

• 3rd Midterm Exam, 25%, essay and short answer questions

• Final Exam, 30%, essay, short answer questions, multiple choice

 

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

39245 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WEL 2.312
(also listed as MAS 374, URB 353 )
show description

     People from Texas will tell you that there is something special about their state.  Even people who are not from Texas will tell you that there is something unique about Texas.  Texas is both South and Southwest, both urban and rural.  Two 20th century two-term presidents have come from Texas—one was one of the nation’s most liberal presidents and one was one of the nation’s most conservative president. No other place except Nashville or New Orleans is acknowledged in the same way as Texas for its music.  Texas is astonishingly multicultural boasting German-Texans, Czech-Texans, African American-Texans, Mexican-American Texans, Asian-Texans, and white native born Texans.  And then, there’s OIL—the juice that fueled the twentieth century.  Yep.  Texas is an interesting place.

     This lecture and reading class will provide a survey of the economic, political, social and cultural, ethnic and racial developments in Texas in the 20th century.  With attention to class and gender as well race, students will learn about the influence that Texas and Texans have had on national politics as well as the issues and developments that have been singularly Texan.

Grades will be based upon two midterm exams (30% of course grade, each), one cumulative final exam (40% of course grade). 

Texts and Readings

As an upper division class, students should expect to complete 100-200 pages of reading each week. 

Assigned readings will include:

  • A textbook about Texas in the 20th century
  • Judith N. McArthur and Hal Smith, Texas Through Women’s Eyes:  The Twentieth Century Experience (2010).
  • Excerpts from Seeking Inalienable Rights: Texans and Their Quest for Justice, ed. By Debra A. Reid (2009).
  • Emilio Zamora:  Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs:  Mexican Workers and Job Politics During World War II (2009).
  • Mary Beth Rogers, Cold Anger:  A Story of Faith and Power Politics (1990).
  • Course packet of articles and primary documents

HIS 350R • Women In Sickness And Health

39424 • Fall 2011
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

In this seminar students will explore the experience of American women, in sickness and in health.  Students will learn about medical and biological views of woman and women’s health, the social context of those views, the development of medical practices and, indeed, a new medical specialty, for the treatment of illness and debility. This study of American women focuses on the 19th and 20th century and looks at the experience of Native-American women, African-American women, Latinas, working class women, and white middle- and upper-class women.  Health topics include menarche and menstruation, childbirth, birth control and abortion, gynecological disorders and reproductive organ cancers, as well as mental health and mental illness.

Course Format:  As an upper-division seminar course, students are expected to read the assignments, report briefly about the assigned readings in weekly warm-up quizzes, participate in class discussions, and complete writing assignments that vary from 3 pages to 10 pages.

Grading:

Class participation = 30% of course grade

Writing assignments = 70% of course grade

Three 3-5 page essays = 14% each; for total of 42% of course grade; 

8-10 page essay = 28% of course grade

Required Reading:

• Judith Walzer Leavitt,  Women and Health in American, 2nd ed.,  University of Wisconsin Press, 1999.

• Tina Cassidy, Birth: The Surprising History of How We Are Born.  Grove Press, 2006

• Marie Jenkins Schwartz, Birthing a Slave:  Motherhood and Medicine in the Antebellum South.  Harvard University Press, 2006.

• Sarah Stage, Female Complaints:  Lydia Pinkham and the Business of Women’s Medicine.  W.W. Norton & Co., 1979.

• Andrea Tone, Devices and Desires:  A History of Contraceptives in America.  Hill & Wang,  2001.

• Jael Silliman, et. al, Undivided Rights:  Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice.  South End Press,  2004.

• Barron H. Lerner, M.D.  The Breast Cancer Wars:  Fear, Hope, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America.  Oxford University Press, 2001

Recommended Reading:

• William Strunk and E.B. White, The Elements of Style, 3rd ed., Macmillan, 1979

 

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

HIS F315K • The United States, 1492-1865

85460 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm WEL 1.308
show description

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps and other graphics are used to provide students with a survey of US history from before the European encounter through the Civil War.  Students will study significant aspects of the nation’s political, economic, and cultural history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  You begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequences.

 

Required Reading:  (available at University Coop)

            James Henretta, et. al., America:  A Concise History, 3rd ed.

            Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers:  The Revolutionary Generation

            Nancy Cott, The Bonds of Womanhood:  Woman’s Sphere in New England, 1780-1835

            Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

 

Grading:

      There will be two in-class exams (each worth 30% of the course grade) and one cumulative final exam (40% of course grade).  The in-class exams will each include one essay questions and 2 short answer questions.   The final exam will include one essay question and 30 multiple choice questions.

      This class will NOT use the plus-minus grading option.

 

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39425 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm ART 1.102
show description

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with a survey of US history from Reconstruction through the 1980s.  As such, students will study significant aspects of the nation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  We begin with learning about what happened, but we then proceed to questions of causality and consequence.

 

Required Reading:

 America: A Concise History, vol 2, 4th ed., by James Henretta and David Brody (hereafter referred to as “Text.”) 

The Jungle, by Upton Siinclair (hereafter referred to as Jungle) 

Major Problems in American History, vol. 2, Elizabeth Cobbs and Jon Gjerde, eds. (hereafter referred to as “C&J”).

The Seventies by Bruce Schulman (hereafter referred to as Schulman).

The Constitution of the United States in the appendix of your text.

 

Assignments:  3 midterm exams and one final exam

HIS 315L • The United States Since 1865

39435 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WCH 1.120
show description

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with a survey of US history from Reconstruction through the 1980s.  As such, students will study significant aspects of the nation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  We begin with learning about what happened, but we then proceed to questions of causality and consequence.

 

Required Reading:

 America: A Concise History, vol 2, 4th ed., by James Henretta and David Brody (hereafter referred to as “Text.”) 

The Jungle, by Upton Siinclair (hereafter referred to as Jungle) 

Major Problems in American History, vol. 2, Elizabeth Cobbs and Jon Gjerde, eds. (hereafter referred to as “C&J”).

The Seventies by Bruce Schulman (hereafter referred to as Schulman).

The Constitution of the United States in the appendix of your text.

 

Assignments:  3 midterm exams and one final exam

HIS 350R • History Of American Feminism

39725 • Spring 2011
Meets TH 400pm-700pm BUR 128
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

350R

Course Description: 

        This upper-division seminar class will investigate various aspects and/or movements of feminism in the United States.  Although we will look at issues of women’s equality in the colonial period, we will spend most of our time studying 19th and 20th century feminist or female advocacy activity including women in the anti-slavery movement, mid-19th century women’s rights advocates, the 19th and early 20th century woman suffrage movement, late 19th century women’s advocacy groups like the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, post World War II women’s rights activism and the Women’s Liberation Movement, as well as what is being tentatively called “Third Wave Feminism.” 

        Students will be expected to read several book length publications over the course of the semester, and students will be expected to participate in weekly class discussion.

 

Writing Assignments for HIS 350R:  The History of American Feminism

  1. Students will be expected to write five essays.
  • One essay (1-2) pages and the first assignment of the course) will be a personal statement:  “What I know, or believe, about the History of Feminism in the United States.”
  • Two essays (2-3 pages each) will be critical book reviews of assigned reading.
  • One essay (2-3 pages) will be a critical book review of a book-length monograph chosen by each student from a list provided with the syllabus.
  • One essay (7-10 pages) will be a research paper on an aspect, or episode, of the history of American feminism.  A list of possible topics will be provided with the syllabus.
  1. Each class will begin with a 5 minute essay about the reading assigned for that class. Students will write in response to a prompt provided by Dr. Seaholm.  Students will exchange these short essays with a classmate, and each will comment on the clarity of the other’s writing.

     3.  Each student will meet with Dr. Seaholm at least twice during the semester to

          discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the student’s writing.   

  1. Students will bring print copies of the third writing assignment to class for peer review.  Students will read each other’s work and make comments.  With this feedback, students are encouraged to make revisions before turning in the completed assignment at the next class.

 

Required Reading:

Christine Stansell, The Feminist Promise:  1792 to the Present (Random House, 2010).

Kathryn Kish Sklar, Women’s Rights Emerges within the Antislavery Movement, 1830-1970:  A History with Documents (Bedford St. Martin’s, 2000).

Aileen S. Kraditor, The Ideas of the Woman Suffrage Movement: 1890-1920 (Columbia University Press, 1965).

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Women and Economics:  A study of the economic relation between men and women as a factor in social evolution (G.P Putnam, 1920).

Nancy Cott, The Grounding of Modern Feminism (Yale University Press, 1989).

Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique (W.W. Norton, 1997 edition, or earlier edition).

Linda Nicholson, ed., The Second Wave:  A Reader in Feminist Theory (Routledge, 1997).

Course Packet:  collection of additional primary sources.

 

 

Grading:

  • 60% of course grade based on weighted average of writing assignments.
  • 40% of course grade based on class participation.  Class participation is evaluated on basis of participation in class discussion and performance on in-class essays.

 

 

 

 

 

HIS 315K • United States, 1492-1865

39070 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am ART 1.102
show description

History 315K:  Pre-Columbus through the Civil War
Fall 2010:  39070 (MWF 10-11) & 39075 (MWF 1-2)
Professor Seaholm, GAR 4.124, seaholm@mail.utexas.edu
Seaholm’s office hours: M, 2:30-4:00 pm & F 2:30-5:00 pm 

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps and other graphics are used to provide students with a survey of US history from before the European encounter through the Civil War.  Students will study significant aspects of the nation’s political, economic, and cultural history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  You begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequences.

 Required Reading:  (available at University Coop)
         James Henretta, et. al., America:  A Concise History, 3rd ed.
         Alfred Young, The Shoemaker and the Tea Party
         Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers:  The Revolutionary Generation
         Nancy Cott, The Bonds of Womanhood:  Woman’s Sphere in New England, 1780-1835
        
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Course Requirements, Grading, and Class Policies

     Students are responsible for all information presented in class and all reading assigned.

Exams:  There will be 4 exams. The first two exams will be 50 minute exams:  one essay question and several fill-in-the-blank questions.  Each of these exams will count as 25% of your grade.  The third exam, multiple choice, will be on the last day of classes and will count as 20% of your grade.  The final exam will be a comprehensive essay exam and will each count as 30% of your grade.

Make-up Exams:  You are expected to take all tests at the scheduled time.  Only students who are unavoidably prevented from taking the test on the scheduled day will be allowed to take a make-up exam.  Students who miss an exam because of illness of other circumstances beyond their control and who wish to take a make-up exam, must make arrangements with me within one week after the missed exam.

  •   1st Midterm Exam, 25%, Wednesday, 9/22

If you fail the first exam, you should consider dropping the class.  Since the first exam will not be graded and returned to you until AFTER the University deadline for dropping a class without possible academic penalty, I will allow any student who chooses to drop before the second exam to drop with a Q (no academic penalty) regardless of one’s grade on the first exam.

  • 2nd Midterm Exam, 25%, Wednesday, 10/20
  • 3rd Exam, 20%, Friday, 12/3
  • Final Exam, 30%, see dates and times at end of Course Schedule.

If you have questions or complaints about your exam grades, you must speak with the Teaching Assistant who graded your exam.  You are welcome to speak with Dr. Seaholm after you have met with your TA.  Also, you should present any questions or complaints about the first exam before the second exam.  You should address any questions about the second exam before the final exam.

Scholastic Dishonesty (aka cheating):   You may not refer to books, notes, or other students during exams.  Any student caught cheating (giving or receiving unauthorized assistance during an exam) will be referred to Student Judicial Services in the Dean of Students’ office.  Subsequent to due process, students caught cheating on exams will receive a grade of F in the course.

Special Testing Requirements:  Recommendations from Services for Students with Disabilities regarding special testing arrangements will, of course, be honored.  Students must talk with me to discuss these arrangements at least one week before scheduled exams.

BLACKBOARD:
The lecture schedule, reading assignments, announcements, reading guides, and study guides will be posted on Blackboard.  You can access Blackboard, using your UT EID, through UT Direct.    Study guides will be posted on Blackboard one week before each exam. 

You should regularly check Blackboard for announcements. 

In the Classroom:

  • I do not record attendance, but students are responsible for all information presented during class.
  • Please be sure that cell phones are silenced during class.
  • Please come to class on time. 
  • Whether you listen or don’t listen, take notes or doodle, read the Daily Texan or write letters home is up to you.  However you spend your time during class, please do not talk.

Supplemental Instruction:  Mr. Sundar Vadlamundi, Ph.D. candidate and veteran TA, will hold supplemental instruction seminars twice a week.  In these sessions, Mr. Vadlamundi will help students review material presented in lecture, reading assignments, and study guides.  He will also help students learn how to study more effectively.  Attendance is voluntary but strongly recommended.

Teaching Assistants:  Six of the History Department’s top graduate students will assist Dr. Seaholm in teaching this class.  They will be introduced to the class; and their names, email addresses, and office hours and locations will be posted under “Faculty Information” on Blackboard. 

Office Hours and Email:  I encourage you to visit with me or any of the Teaching Assistants during office hours.  You may wish to schedule an appointment to meet with one of us if you are not able to meet during office hours.  When you contact us by email, please let us know your name.

This course contains a Cultural Diversity flag.

HIS 315K • United States, 1492-1865

39075 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 2.102A
show description

History 315K:  Pre-Columbus through the Civil War
Fall 2010:  39070 (MWF 10-11) & 39075 (MWF 1-2)
Professor Seaholm, GAR 4.124, seaholm@mail.utexas.edu
Seaholm’s office hours: M, 2:30-4:00 pm & F 2:30-5:00 pm 

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps and other graphics are used to provide students with a survey of US history from before the European encounter through the Civil War.  Students will study significant aspects of the nation’s political, economic, and cultural history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  You begin with learning about what happened and then proceed to questions of causality and consequences.

 Required Reading:  (available at University Coop)
         James Henretta, et. al., America:  A Concise History, 3rd ed.
         Alfred Young, The Shoemaker and the Tea Party
         Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers:  The Revolutionary Generation
         Nancy Cott, The Bonds of Womanhood:  Woman’s Sphere in New England, 1780-1835
        
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Course Requirements, Grading, and Class Policies

     Students are responsible for all information presented in class and all reading assigned.

Exams:  There will be 4 exams. The first two exams will be 50 minute exams:  one essay question and several fill-in-the-blank questions.  Each of these exams will count as 25% of your grade.  The third exam, multiple choice, will be on the last day of classes and will count as 20% of your grade.  The final exam will be a comprehensive essay exam and will each count as 30% of your grade.

Make-up Exams:  You are expected to take all tests at the scheduled time.  Only students who are unavoidably prevented from taking the test on the scheduled day will be allowed to take a make-up exam.  Students who miss an exam because of illness of other circumstances beyond their control and who wish to take a make-up exam, must make arrangements with me within one week after the missed exam.

  •   1st Midterm Exam, 25%, Wednesday, 9/22

If you fail the first exam, you should consider dropping the class.  Since the first exam will not be graded and returned to you until AFTER the University deadline for dropping a class without possible academic penalty, I will allow any student who chooses to drop before the second exam to drop with a Q (no academic penalty) regardless of one’s grade on the first exam.

  • 2nd Midterm Exam, 25%, Wednesday, 10/20
  • 3rd Exam, 20%, Friday, 12/3
  • Final Exam, 30%, see dates and times at end of Course Schedule.

If you have questions or complaints about your exam grades, you must speak with the Teaching Assistant who graded your exam.  You are welcome to speak with Dr. Seaholm after you have met with your TA.  Also, you should present any questions or complaints about the first exam before the second exam.  You should address any questions about the second exam before the final exam.

Scholastic Dishonesty (aka cheating):   You may not refer to books, notes, or other students during exams.  Any student caught cheating (giving or receiving unauthorized assistance during an exam) will be referred to Student Judicial Services in the Dean of Students’ office.  Subsequent to due process, students caught cheating on exams will receive a grade of F in the course.

Special Testing Requirements:  Recommendations from Services for Students with Disabilities regarding special testing arrangements will, of course, be honored.  Students must talk with me to discuss these arrangements at least one week before scheduled exams.

BLACKBOARD:
The lecture schedule, reading assignments, announcements, reading guides, and study guides will be posted on Blackboard.  You can access Blackboard, using your UT EID, through UT Direct.    Study guides will be posted on Blackboard one week before each exam. 

You should regularly check Blackboard for announcements. 

In the Classroom:

  • I do not record attendance, but students are responsible for all information presented during class.
  • Please be sure that cell phones are silenced during class.
  • Please come to class on time. 
  • Whether you listen or don’t listen, take notes or doodle, read the Daily Texan or write letters home is up to you.  However you spend your time during class, please do not talk.

Supplemental Instruction:  Mr. Sundar Vadlamundi, Ph.D. candidate and veteran TA, will hold supplemental instruction seminars twice a week.  In these sessions, Mr. Vadlamundi will help students review material presented in lecture, reading assignments, and study guides.  He will also help students learn how to study more effectively.  Attendance is voluntary but strongly recommended.

Teaching Assistants:  Six of the History Department’s top graduate students will assist Dr. Seaholm in teaching this class.  They will be introduced to the class; and their names, email addresses, and office hours and locations will be posted under “Faculty Information” on Blackboard. 

Office Hours and Email:  I encourage you to visit with me or any of the Teaching Assistants during office hours.  You may wish to schedule an appointment to meet with one of us if you are not able to meet during office hours.  When you contact us by email, please let us know your name.

This course contains a Cultural Diversity flag.

This course contains a Cultural Diversity flag.

HIS 350R • History Of American Feminism

39325 • Fall 2010
Meets W 300pm-600pm CAL 21
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

HIS 350R-39325; WGS 345-37135, Fall 2010,
Wednesdays, CAL 21
History of American Feminism                                            
Dr. Megan Seaholm, seaholm@mail.utexas.edu
GAR 4.124:  Mondays, 2:30-4:30; Fridays, 2:30-5:00 and by appointment

Course Description:  This upper-division seminar uses contemporary documents and the work of historians to investigate the history of feminism in the British colonies of North America and in the United States, 17th century to the present.  Beginning with the question, “What is feminism?,” students will trace agitation regarding the status and role of women, the various forms of that agitation or activism, and different  ideological arguments—made at different times—for expanding the legal and customary rights of women.  Since the experience of women in the colonies and the United States has, as with men, been significantly influenced by race, class, and ethnicity, students will learn about the activism and the critique of these women and the inclusion or exclusion of those groups in the movements led by middle- and upper-class white women. 

    As a seminar, students are expected to do a lot reading and to discuss that reading in class.  As a “writing flag,” students are also expected to improve their writing in short in-class essays and in four essays on assigned topics.

Required Reading:

  • Christine Stansell, The Feminist Promise:  1792 to the Present (Random House, 2010).
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Women and Economics:  A study of the economic relation between men and women as a factory in social evolution (1898, Putnam, 1920)
  • Jean Baker, ed., Votes for Women:  The Struggle for Suffrage Revisited (Oxford, 2002).
  • Nancy Cott, The Grounding of Modern Feminism (Yale University Press, 1989).
  • Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique (W.W. Norton, 1997 edition, or earlier edition).
  • Linda Nicholson, ed., The Second Wave:  A Reader in Feminist Theory (Routledge, 1997).
  • Additional essays or documents as provided.

Writing Assignments:  60% of course grade based on weighted average of writing assignments.

  1.  One 2 page essay:  “Given the Enlightenment’s challenges to traditions of hierarchy, why didn’t a woman’s rights movement accompany the American Revolution or the early national period….or, was there such a movement?” (10% of writing grade; 6% of course grade)
  2.  Two 3-5 page essays on assigned topics related to readings. (each = 20% of writing grade; each = 12% of course grade).  Possible topics will be discussed in class.
  3. One  8-10 page essay on approved research topic exploring a particular aspect of feminist in American history (50% of writing grade; 30% of course grade).

Issues that could be addressed in this essay:
1)   What is the 3rd Wave?
2)   The Relation between Feminism and Female Reproduction Health
3)   The Differences and Similarities between ‘Liberal Feminism’ and ‘Radical Feminism
4)   The Relationship between late-20th century Feminism and the so-called ‘Sexual Revolution’
5)   Issues of Race and Class in American Feminism
6)   How has, and is, the ‘feminism’ of African-American or Latina women different and similar from that of Anglo
American women?
7)   Feminist Challenges for the 21th Century
8)   Feminism and the Family:  Problem or Promise
9)   Feminism and ‘Municipal Housekeeping’
10) The Feminist Impulse in the Early Republic
11)  Do Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Lady Gaga have anything in common as feminists?
12)   Will the ‘real’ feminists please stand up:  An historical account of controversies within women’s rights movements in America?
13)  Was there a women’s rights movement between 1920 and 1960?  If so, what was it?
14)  Essentialism vs. Egalitarianism in 19th century Feminism

Citations and Attribution:
Students are expected to use proper citation whenever using the words or the thoughts of others.  You may use any of the major citation style sheets (MLA, Chicago, or APA), but I think you will find the APA style the easiest to use.  The Undergraduate Writing Center provides guidelines for using APA in citations: http://uwc.utexas.edu/handouts

Grading:

  • 60% of course grade based on weighted average of writing assignments.
  • 40% of course grade based on class participation.  Class participation is evaluated on basis of participation in class discussion and performance on in-class essays.

Plagiarism:  Using the words or thoughts of another without attribution is plagiarism   and will not be allowed in this class.  Be sure to read “The Standard of Academic Integrity” posted on the Dean of Students website:  http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acint_student.php.

Also, be sure to read “A Brief Guide to Avoiding Plagiarism,” posted online by UT’s LBJ School Writing Center:  http://www.utexas.edu/lbj/writing/plagiarism.pdf.

With this information, all students in this class are expected to avoid plagiarizing in their essays.  Students who do plagiarize will receive an “F” in the class and will be referred to Student Judicial Services in the Dean of Students Office.

Class attendance:  Regular attendance in class, excepting illness or family emergency, is required and will be considered in the class participation grade.

Course Schedule: (subject to minor changes)

8/25            Class Introduction and 5-minute essay

9/1            Women in North America:  17th and 18th centuries

  • MS:  Overview of the status of women in western history
  • Reading:  Stansell, Introduction through Chapter 1; Wollstonecraft, posted on Bb
  • 1st writing assignment (2 pp) due:  “Given the Enlightenment’s challenges to traditions of hierarchy, why didn’t a woman’s rights movement  accompany the American Revolution or the early national period….or, was there such a movement?”

9/8            American Women and Antebellum Reform

  • MS:  The Feminization of Religion and “Moral Reform”   
    • Reading, Stansell, chapters 2-4 

9/15            “Domestic Feminism” in the 19th century

  • MS:  “Voluntary Motherhood,” “Home Protection,” and Higher Education:  Feminism?
  • Reading:  Stansell, chapters 5-7

9/22            19th century organized “feminism” and the Woman Suffrage Movement

  • Readings, selections from Baker (TBA) 
  • MS:  Writing issues 

9/29            The Woman Suffrage Movement

  • Reading:  selections from Baker (TBA)
  • Video:  “Votes for Women”

 10/1            NO CLASS; 2nd Essay Due (3-5 pp)

10/6            The Feminism of Charlotte Perkins Gilman
           
Reading:  CPG’s Women and Economics

10/13              Early Twentieth Century Feminism:  Suffrage and More (or less?)
           
Reading:  Nancy Cott, The Grounding of Modern Feminism, Introduction through chapter 3

10/20  Feminism and Birth Control
             
MS:  Overview
             Video:  “Margaret Sanger”

10/27  The Grounding of Modern Feminism:  after suffrage
            
Reading:  complete Nancy Cott’s book

10/29  NO CLASS; 3rd Essay Due (3-5 pp)

11/3   The Early History of the Second Wave of 20th century Feminism
           
MS:  Women’s Rights Action, World War 1 – 1960
         Reading:  Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique
        
Library conference with reference librarians, 4:30

11/10  The Second Wave
           
Reading:  Stansell, chapters 8-10;  Nicholson, The Second Wave, selections numbers  1,2,3,4,15.

11/17  Controversies in the Second Wave
           
Reading:  Nicholson, numbers 5, 6, 9, 10, 16, 19, 20, 23

11/24  Reading and Reflection

12/1  Anti-Feminism, Anti-Feminism Feminists, and the Third Wave:  Does Feminism Have a Future?
Reading:  Stansell, chapter 11; “Lady Power,” posted on Blackboard; other articles posted on Bb

12/9            Final Essays (8-10 pages) due.

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

39430 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 WEL 1.308
show description

Megan Seaholm,  Spring 2010

US History:  Reconstruction to the Present
            HIS 315L-39430, MWF 11-12
            HIS 315L-39434, MWF 1-2

Course Description:  Lectures, readings, videos, maps, and photos are used to provide students with a survey of US history from Reconstruction through the 1980s.  As such, students will study significant aspects of the nation's political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history and will be challenged to understand the why, how, and so what of this history.  We begin with learning about what happened, but we then proceed to questions of causality and consequence.

Required Reading:

  • America: A Concise History, vol 2, 4th ed., by James Henretta and David Brody (hereafter referred to as “Text.”) 
  • The Jungle, by Upton Siinclair (hereafter referred to as Jungle)
  • Major Problems in American History, vol. 2, Elizabeth Cobbs and Jon Gjerde, eds. (hereafter referred to as “C&J”).
  • The Seventies by Bruce Schulman (hereafter referred to as Schulman).
  • The Constitution of the United States in the appendix of your text.

 

Assignments:  3 midterm exams and one final exam

 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

39435 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WCH 1.120
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 350L • Women In Sickness And Health-W

39690 • Spring 2010
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

39770 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 GAR 0.102
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

39780 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GSB 2.126
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 350L • Women In Sickness And Health-W

40065 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CBA 4.348
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

38900 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm UTC 2.102A
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 315L • United States Since 1865

38905 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm WCH 1.120
show description

Survey of United States history since the Civil War.

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

 

HIS 350L • Women In Sickness And Health-W

39170 • Spring 2009
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

bottom border