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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Charters Wynn

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1987, Stanford University

Associate Professor; Director of Normandy Scholar Program on World War II
Charters Wynn

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7234
  • Office: GAR 1.120
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: MT 2-3 p.m. & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

Soviet political and labor history. He is currently working on a study of NEP Russia and the early Stalinist period tentatively titled, "From the Factory to the Kremlin: Mikhail Tomsky and Soviet Trade Unionism."

 

Courses taught

Undergraduate and graduate courses on Revolutionary Russia and Stalinist Russia as well as the undergraduate Soviet survey. He also teaches Stalin's Russia at War as a faculty member in the Normandy Scholar Program.

 

Teaching Awards/Honors

President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award for 2010-11 academic year
Eyes of Texas Excellence Award, fall 2006
Raymond Dickson Centennial Endowed Teaching Fellowship 2008

 

Book Award

American Historical Association Herbert Baxter Adams Prize

 

Publications

Workers, Strikes, and Pogroms: The Donbass- Dnepr Bend in Late Imperial Russia, 1870-1905 (Princeton University Press).  This study of the labor movement in Russia's main mining and steel region reveals the violent character and shifting, politically contradictory hostilities and allegiances of workers in the 1905 Revolution.

HIS 383 • Soviet Union: Wwii-Collapse

39880 • Fall 2014
Meets F 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as REE 385 )
show description

This graduate “reading” seminar will examine the history and historiography of the Soviet Union from World War II to the collapse of the Soviet system in 1991.  Much of the course will focus on the interaction between the party-state and society: both how government policies affected people's daily lives and how social and economic realities, as well as popular expectations and intelligentsia resistance, shaped and constrained state policy.  We also devote considerable attention to Soviet foreign policy during the Cold War.

 

Work/Grading: Weekly reviews of the readings, two pages in length each, constitute the written work for the course.  The final grade will be based on class participation as well as on the written work.

 

Readings:

Richard Overy, Russia’s War: A History of the Soviet War Effort: 1941-1945.

Rebecca Manley, To the Tashkent Station: Evacuation and Survival in the Soviet Union

at War.

Amir Weiner, Making Sense of War: The Second World War and the Fate of the

Bolshevik Revolution.

Elena Zubkova, Russia after the War: Hope, Illusions, and Disappointment, 1945-1957.

William Taubman, Khrushchev: The Man and His Era.

Miriam Dobson, Khrushchev’s Cold Summer: Gulag Returnees, Crime, and the Fate of

Reform after Stalin.

Aleksandr  Fursenko & Timothy Naftali, Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an

American Adversary.

Vladislav Zubok, Zhivago’s Children: The Last Russian Intelligentsia.

Donald Raleigh, Soviet Baby Boomers: An Oral History of Russia’s Cold War

Generation.

Vladislav Zubok, A Failed Empire: The Soviet Union in the Cold War from Stalin to

Gorbachev.

Stephen Kotkin, Armageddon Averted: The Soviet Collapse 1970-2000.

Archie Brown, The Gorbachev Factor.

Alexei Yurchak, Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More: The Last Soviet

Generation.

HIS 343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

39840 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.128
(also listed as REE 335 )
show description

                                  HISTORY OF RUSSIA FROM 1917

                                         HIS 343M/REE 335

 

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

 

 

HIS 350L • Stalin's Russia At War

39935 • Spring 2014
Meets WF 200pm-330pm GAR 0.128
show description

Violence, famine, and epidemic disease took more than fifty million Soviet lives between 1914 and 1953.  Over half of these deaths occurred between 1941 and 1945, when the Soviet Union fought the most savage and immense war in history.  No other nation ever endured anything like it.  The Soviets defeated the invading Axis powers despite the purge of its military leadership in 1937, horrible mistakes at the outset of the war, and widespread hostility within the country to the Stalinist regime.  We will focus on the impact of the Stalinist state’s brutal revolution from above, popular and elite fears and beliefs during the Great Terror, the death and destruction during the German occupation, as well as the courage and barbarism in the fight to the death on the Eastern Front, especially during the Battles of Moscow, Stalingrad, Kursk, and Berlin.  Evaluating the role of Stalin (or “Uncle Joe” as the American and British public knew him) and his inner circle, as well as what the Stalinist Revolution and “Great Patriotic War” meant for ordinary Soviets, will be of particular concern.

 Grading: This course contains a substantial writing component.  During the course of the semester students will write four critical analyses of assigned reading, five pages in length each.  In addition, by 11:00 a.m. on most class days, students will e-mail me three questions dealing with that day’s reading.  The final grade is based on both the written assignments (60% essays; 10% questions) and classroom participation (30%).

 Texts:

Kevin McDermott, Stalin.

S. A. Smith, The Russian Revolution.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Lydia Chukovskaya, Sofia Petrovna.

Richard Overy, Russia’s War.

Catherine Merridale, Ivan’s War.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Lee Baker, The Second World War on the Eastern Front.

Course Packet available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St.

HIS 383 • Stalinist Russia

40140 • Fall 2013
Meets F 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as REE 385 )
show description

This graduate seminar will examine the history and historiography of the Stalinist period.  Much of the course will focus on the interaction between the party-state and society: both how government policies affected people's daily lives and how social and economic realities, as well as popular resistance, shaped and constrained state policy.  We will also focus on the brutal war on the Eastern Front, including its origins and legacy.

Texts:

Fitzpatrick, Sheila.  Stalin's Peasants: Resistance and Survival in the Russian Village     after Collectivization.

Kotkin, Stephen.  Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization.

Fitzpatrick, Sheila.  Everyday Stalinism: Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times.

Getty, J. Arch.  The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the     Bolsheviks, 1932-1939.

Viola, Lynne.  The Unknown Gulag: The Lost World of Special Settlements.

Figes, Orlando.  The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin’s Russia.

Applebaum, Anne.  Gulag: A History.

Merridale, Catherine.  Ivan’s War: Life and Death in the Red Army, 1939-1945.

Gorodetsky, Gabriel.  Grand Delusion: Stalin and the German Invasion of Russia.

Gorlizki, Oleg.  Cold Peace: Stalin and the Soviet Ruling Circle, 1945-1953.

Roberts, Geoffrey. Stalin’s Wars: From World War to Cold War, 1939-1953.

Kirschenbaum, Lisa.  The Legacy of the Siege of Leningrad, 1941-1995: Myth,     Memories, and Monuments.

Grading:

Weekly reviews of the readings, two pages in length each, constitute the written work for the course.  The final grade will be based on class participation as well as on the written work.

HIS 343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

39460 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.110
(also listed as REE 335 )
show description

                                  HISTORY OF RUSSIA FROM 1917

                                         HIS 343M/REE 335

 

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

 

 

HIS 350L • Stalin's Russia At War

39545 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 200pm-330pm CLA 2.606
show description

Course Description: Violence, famine, and epidemic disease took more than fifty million Soviet lives between 1914 and 1953.  Over half of these deaths occurred between 1941 and 1945, when the Soviet Union fought the most savage and immense war in history.  No other nation ever endured anything like it.  The Soviets defeated the invading Axis powers despite the purge of its military leadership in 1937, horrible mistakes at the outset of the war, and widespread hostility within the country to the Stalinist regime.  We will focus on the impact of the Stalinist state’s brutal revolution from above, popular and elite fears and beliefs during the Great Terror, the death and destruction during the German occupation, as well as the courage and barbarism in the fight to the death on the Eastern Front, especially during the Battles of Moscow, Stalingrad, Kursk, and Berlin.  Evaluating the role of Stalin (or “Uncle Joe” as the American and British public knew him) and his inner circle, as well as what the Stalinist Revolution and “Great Patriotic War” meant for ordinary Soviets, will be of particular concern. 

 

Grading: This course contains a substantial writing component.  During the course of the semester students will write four critical analyses of assigned reading, five pages in length each.  In addition, by 11:00 a.m. on most class days, students will e-mail me three questions dealing with that day’s reading.  The final grade is based on both the written assignments (60% essays; 10% questions) and classroom participation (30%). 

 

Texts:

Kevin McDermott, Stalin.

S. A. Smith, The Russian Revolution.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Lydia Chukovskaya, Sofia Petrovna.

Richard Overy, Russia’s War.

Catherine Merridale, Ivan’s War.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Lee Baker, The Second World War on the Eastern Front.

Course Packet available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St.

HIS 383 • Revolutionary Russia

39700 • Fall 2012
Meets F 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as REE 385 )
show description

Description: The purpose of this graduate reading course is to introduce students to the literature and historiographic debates in Russian history from the end of the imperial regime to the beginning of the Stalinist era.  The readings, a mix of older and newer works, will focus on both the “high” politics of the period and the social and political pressure from “below.” 

Textbooks/Reading:  The books will all be available for purchase in paperback editions from the University Co-op, 2246 Guadalupe.

Figes, Orlando. A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution: 1891- 1924.

Pipes, Richard. The Russian Revolution.

Read, Christopher. From Tsar to Soviets: The Russian People and Their Revolution, 1917-21.

Stone, Norman. The Eastern Front, 1914-1917.

Gatrell, Peter. A Whole Empire Walking: Refugees in Russia during World War I.

Rabinowitch, Alexander. The Bolsheviks Come to Power.

Lincoln, W. Bruce. Red Victory: A History of the Russian Civil War.

Deutscher, Isaac. The Prophet Unarmed: Trotsky, 1921-1929.

Cohen, Stephen. Bukharin and the Bolshevik Revolution: A Political Biography, 1888-1938.

Stites, Richard. Revolutionary Dreams: Utopian Vision and Experimental Life in the Russian Revolution.

Goldman, Wendy. Women, the State and Revolution: Soviet Family Policy and Social Life, 1917-1936.

Work/Grading: Weekly reviews of the readings, two pages in length each, constitute the written work for the course.  The final grade will be based on class participation as well as on the written work.

HIS S343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

85680 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as REE S335 )
show description

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

 

HIS 343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

39320 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 4.112
(also listed as REE 335 )
show description

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

HIS 350L • Stalin's Russia At War

39390 • Spring 2012
Meets WF 200pm-330pm GAR 2.128
show description

Course Description: Violence, famine, and epidemic disease took more than fifty million Soviet lives between 1914 and 1953.  Over half of these deaths occurred between 1941 and 1945, when the Soviet Union fought the most savage and immense war in history.  No other nation ever endured anything like it.  The Soviets defeated the invading Axis powers despite the purge of its military leadership in 1937, horrible mistakes at the outset of the war, and widespread hostility within the country to the Stalinist regime.  We will focus on the impact of the Stalinist state’s brutal revolution from above, popular and elite fears and beliefs during the Great Terror, the death and destruction during the German occupation, as well as the courage and barbarism in the fight to the death on the Eastern Front, especially during the Battles of Moscow, Stalingrad, Kursk, and Berlin.  Evaluating the role of Stalin (or “Uncle Joe” as the American and British public knew him) and his inner circle, as well as what the Stalinist Revolution and “Great Patriotic War” meant for ordinary Soviets, will be of particular concern. 

 

Grading: This course contains a substantial writing component.  During the course of the semester students will write four critical analyses of assigned reading, five pages in length each.  In addition, by 11:00 a.m. on most class days, students will e-mail me three questions dealing with that day’s reading.  The final grade is based on both the written assignments (60% essays; 10% questions) and classroom participation (30%). 

 

Texts:

Kevin McDermott, Stalin.

S. A. Smith, The Russian Revolution.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Lydia Chukovskaya, Sofia Petrovna.

Richard Overy, Russia’s War.

Catherine Merridale, Ivan’s War.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Lee Baker, The Second World War on the Eastern Front.

Course Packet available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St.

HIS 383 • Stalinist Russia

39650 • Fall 2011
Meets F 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as REE 385 )
show description

“We will keep out the kulaks” – propaganda poster from 1930 

                                                   

Description: This graduate seminar will examine the history and historiography of the Stalinist period.  The course will focus primarily on the interaction between the party-state and society: both how the policies of Stalin and his entourage affected people’s daily lives and how social and economic realities shaped and constrained state policy.  We will focus on forced collectivization and industrialization, mass terror, the “Great Patriotic War,” and post-war Stalinism.  We will end with a book on the intelligentsia after Stalin’s death.  Over the course of the semester you will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering people experienced in Stalin’s Soviet Union. 

Work/Grading: Weekly reviews of the readings, two pages in length each, constitute the written work for the course.  The final grade will be based on class participation as well as on the written work.

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

WEEK ONE: 8/26  Introduction

WEEK TWO: 9/2  Naimark, Norman.  Stalin’s Genocides.

WEEK THREE: 9/9  Viola, Lynne.  The Unknown Gulag.

WEEK FOUR: 9/16  Kotkin, Stephen.  Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization.

WEEK FIVE: 9/23 Fitzpatrick, Sheila.  Everyday Stalinism: Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times.

WEEK SIX: 9/30 Getty, J. Arch.  The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932-1939.

WEEK SEVEN: 10/7 Figes, Orlando.  The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin’s Russia

WEEK EIGHT: 10/14 Applebaum, Anne.  Gulag: A History.

WEEK NINE: 10/21 Overy, Richard.  Russia’s War: A History of the Soviet War Effort: 1941-1945.

WEEK TEN: 10/28 Merridale, Catherine.  Ivan’s War: Life and Death in the Red Army, 1939-1945

WEEK ELEVEN: 11/4   Gorlizki, Yoram and Oleg Khlevniuk.  Cold Peace: Stalin and the SovieT Ruling Circle, 1945-1953 

WEEK TWELVE: 11/11 Zubkova, Elena, Russia after the War: Hopes, Illusions, and Disappointment, 1945-1957

WEEK THIRTEEN: 11/18 ASSOCIATION FOR SLAVIC, EAST EUROPEAN AND EURASIAN STUDIES CONVENTION – NO CLASS

WEEK FOURTEEN: 11/25 THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY – NO CLASS

WEEK FIFTEEN: 12/2 Zubok, Vladislav, Zhivago’s Children: The Last Russian Intelligentsia

HIS S343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

85655 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as REE S335 )
show description

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

HIS 343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

39600 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as REE 335 )
show description

                                  HISTORY OF RUSSIA FROM 1917

                                         HIS 343M/REE 335

 

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

 

 

HIS 350L • Stalin's Russia At War

39700 • Spring 2011
Meets WF 200pm-330pm SZB 464
show description

Course Description: Violence, famine, and epidemic disease took more than fifty million Soviet lives between 1914 and 1953.  Over half of these deaths occurred between 1941 and 1945, when the Soviet Union fought the most savage and immense war in history.  No other nation ever endured anything like it.  The Soviets defeated the invading Axis powers despite the purge of its military leadership in 1937, horrible mistakes at the outset of the war, and widespread hostility within the country to the Stalinist regime.  We will focus on the impact of the Stalinist state’s brutal revolution from above, popular and elite fears and beliefs during the Great Terror, the death and destruction during the German occupation, as well as the courage and barbarism in the fight to the death on the Eastern Front, especially during the Battles of Moscow, Stalingrad, Kursk, and Berlin.  Evaluating the role of Stalin (or “Uncle Joe” as the American and British public knew him) and his inner circle, as well as what the Stalinist Revolution and “Great Patriotic War” meant for ordinary Soviets, will be of particular concern. 

 

Grading: This course contains a substantial writing component.  During the course of the semester students will write four critical analyses of assigned reading, five pages in length each.  In addition, by 11:00 a.m. on most class days, students will e-mail me three questions dealing with that day’s reading.  The final grade is based on both the written assignments (60% essays; 10% questions) and classroom participation (30%). 

 

Texts:

Kevin McDermott, Stalin.

S. A. Smith, The Russian Revolution.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Lydia Chukovskaya, Sofia Petrovna.

Richard Overy, Russia’s War.

Catherine Merridale, Ivan’s War.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Lee Baker, The Second World War on the Eastern Front.

Course Packet available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St.

 

 

 

HIS 383 • Revolutionary Russia

39575 • Fall 2010
Meets F 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as REE 385 )
show description

The revolutionary turmoil of the 1917 Revolutions, and the Civil War the Communists' seizure of power triggered, allow us to examine in depth the political, social, economic, and cultural dynamics at work in early twentieth-century Russia.  The Russian Revolution, which began in 1905, provides much of the prism through which we view processes of revolutionary change.  Moreover, the mass and variety of scholarly attention lavished on it makes Revolutionary Russia an ideal subject for studying different approaches to history.  The issue of possible alternative outcomes, which has always engaged Western historians of the Russian Revolution, is now of considerable interest in the former Soviet Union, which once again finds itself in a state of flux, facing an uncertain future.

Texts

Some of the readings will analyze the revolutionary process.  Others will convey the excitement and suffering in the streets.  In addition, short documents may be distributed in class.

Read, Christopher, From Tsar to Soviets.

Pipes, Richard, A Concise History of the Russian Revolution.

Figes, Orlando, A People’s Tragedy.

*Course Packet: Selections from the Packet are noted by an asterisk in the Weekly Schedule.  The Packet is available from Pardigm,  407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

Requirements and Grading

The final grade is based on the essays (65%), weekly questions (10%), and classroom participation (25%).  Each student is expected to participate fully in class discussions and will be graded on the extent and quality of participation.  It is therefore mandatory that you complete the assigned readings before each class session and come to class prepared to discuss the readings.  The course will not work otherwise. 

 

 

HIS 343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

85130 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm UTC 4.132
(also listed as REE 335 )
show description

Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolutions; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  Over the course of the session you will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading

Three in-class examinations worth one-third each.

 

Readings

Ronald Grigor Suny, The Soviet Experiment.
John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.
John Scott, Behind the Urals.
Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.
*Course Packet

HIS 343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

39565 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 UTC 4.112
show description

Prof: Charters Wynn                                        Office: GAR 1.120 wynn@mail.utexas.edu                                        Phone: 475-7234
Office Hours: Tues. 11-12; Wed. 3:30-5 & by appointment                

 

T.A.:                                                                                          

 

                                         HISTORY OF RUSSIA FROM 1917    
                         HIS 343M.39565/ REE 45530  UTC 4.110   TTh 9:30-10:45

 

                                 The sufferings of the Russian people are incomparable.
                                                    – Nadezhda Mandelstam

 

                             It was the Russians who tore the guts out of the German Army.
                                                     – Winston Churchill

 

                     The most dangerous time for a bad government is when it starts to reform itself.
                                                     – Alexis de Tocqueville

 

 

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev and Gorbachev, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir and a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each.  No make-up exams will be given without prior clearance and a verifiable medical excuse. 

 

Texts:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.
Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.
John Scott, Behind the Urals.
Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.
Lee Baker, The Second World War on the Eastern Front.
Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.
William Thompson, The Soviet Union under Brezhnev (in the course packet).
Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?
*Course Packet
: An asterisk next to a reading in the weekly schedule indicates a selection from the Packet. The Packet is available fro Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986

 

*The outlines for each class will be posted on blackboard so you can bring them to class.  Students are expected to attend all lectures.  In case of  absences it is your responsibility to find out about schedule changes or other information, as well as any readings distributed in class.

*Refrain from leaving the classroom during class.  It is distracting both to me and to your fellow students.

*Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from Services for Students with Disabilities.          

                  

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

 

WEEK ONE
Introduction: Imperial Russia

Tuesday, January 19
Film clip: “Why We Fight”

 

Opposition to Tsarism
Thursday, January 21
Reading: Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1-9
            *“Father Gapon’s Petition”

 

WEEK TWO
In War and Revolution

Tuesday, January 26
Reading: Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 9-35
              McCauley, Stalinism, 13-14
              *Mendel, “The Question Remains Open”  

 

The Revolution Moves Leftward
Thursday, January 28
Reading: Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 37-110

 

WEEK THREE
Bolshevik Seizure of Power

Tuesday, February 2
Reading: Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 111-157
              McCauley, Stalinism, 15-16
              Strayer, Why, 21-27
             *Pipes, “Why Did the Bolsheviks Triumph?”
Film clip: “Reds”

 

The Civil War
Thursday, February 4
Reading: Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 158-189
              McCauley, Stalinism, 5-6, 17-25
              *Fitzpatrick, “The Civil War”        

 

 

WEEK FOUR
NEP Russia & Stalin’s Path to Power

Tuesday, February 9
Reading: McCauley, Stalinism, 3-4, 24-35; docs. 1-2
              Strayer, Why, 27-37

 

Assault on the Countryside: Collectivization
Thursday, February 11
Reading: McCauley, Stalinism, 39-41; docs. 3-4, 6, 24
              Scott, Urals, 95-99, 117-126

 

WEEK FIVE
Building Socialism: Breakneck Industrialization

Tuesday, February 16
Reading: McCauley, Stalinism, 41-46, 57-60; docs. 5, 7, 17a , 27
             Scott, Urals, ix-xxv, 3-51, 63-92, 128-133, 148-150, 164-170, 209-244

 

Thursday, February 18
*** Exam 1 ***

 

WEEK SIX
The Stalinist Political Order

Tuesday, February 23
Reading: McCauley, Stalinism, 46-54, 61-63; docs. 8-15
              Scott, Urals, 151-153, 173-206, 247-248
              Koestler, Darkness, 1-96 

The Great Terror
 Thursday, February 25
Reading: Koestler, Darkness, 97-167

 

WEEK SEVEN
The Problem of Confession

Tuesday, March 2
Reading: Koestler, Darkness, 169-272

How War Came
Thursday, March 4
Reading: McCauley, Stalinism, 54-57
              Baker, 1-31; docs. 1-6
Film clip: “The Darkness Descends”

 

WEEK EIGHT
The Great Patriotic War: Road to Stalingrad

Tuesday, March 9
Reading: McCauley, Stalinism, 64-68; docs. 16, 18a
              Baker, 32-73; docs. 7-17

 

The Great Patriotic War: Road to Berlin
Thursday, March 11
Reading: Baker, 73-107; docs. 18-23
             McCauley, Stalinism, 69-75, docs. 17b, 18b, 19-21
Film clips: “The Citadel” and “Fall of Berlin”


                  *** Spring Break***

 

WEEK NINE
Reconstruction and the Origins of the Cold War

Tuesday, March 23
Reading: McCauley, Stalinism, 76-88; docs. 22, 25, 26

 

Stalinism Assessed
Thursday, March 25
Reading: McCauley, Stalinism, 8-12, 91-103
Strayer, Why, 37-44
*Read, “Main Currents of Interpretation”
*Cohen, “Bolshevism and Stalinism”

 

WEEK TEN
Tuesday, March 30
***Exam 2***

 

The Khrushchev Years: Perils of Reform
Thursday, April 1
Reading: McCauley, Khrushchev, 1-51; docs. 1-14
Strayer, Why, 46-51

 

WEEK ELEVEN
Khrushchev: On Top of the World

Tuesday, April 6
Reading: McCauley, Khrushchev, 52-74; docs. 15-18

 

Khrushchev’s Fall
Thursday, April 8
Reading: McCauley, Khrushchev, 76-99; docs. 19-20
              Thompson, Brezhnev, 1-11

 

WEEK TWELVE
Brezhnev Era Foreign Affairs

Tuesday, April 13
Reading: Thompson, Brezhnev, 13-63

 

From Economic Growth to Stagnation and Decline
Thursday, April 15
Reading: Thompson, Brezhnev, 64-97
              Strayer, Why, 52-83
              *Millar, “The Little Deal”
              *Bushnell, “New Soviet Man”
              *Feifer, “No Protest: The Case of the Passive Majority”

 

WEEK THIRTEEN
From Sakharov to Andropov

Tuesday, April 20
Reading: Thompson, Brezhnev, 98-118
              *Hosking, “Return of the Repressed”

 

The Rise of Gorbachev and the Beginnings of Reform
Thursday, April 22
Reading, Strayer, Why, 86-106

 

WEEK FOURTEEN
The Gorbachev Experiment

Tuesday, April 27
Reading, Strayer, Why, 106-130
             *Brown, “Gorbachev and Foreign Policy”

 

Economic Crisis and Social Awakening
Thursday, April 29
Reading, Strayer, Why, 132-171

 

WEEK FIFTEEN
The Death of the Soviet Empire

Tuesday, May 4
Reading: Strayer, Why, 3-20, 174-205
             *Malia, “The Perverse Logic of Utopia”
             *Dallin, “Causes of the Collapse of the USSR”
             *Rowley, “Interpretations of the End of the Soviet Union”

Thursday, May 6
***Exam 3***

HIS 350L • Stalin's Russia At War-W

39710 • Spring 2010
Meets WF 200pm-330pm JES A203A
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Prof. Charters Wynn                                                      HIS 350L: 39710
Office: GAR 1.120                                                         Spring 2010       
Phone: 475-7234                                                          JES A215A: WF 2-3:30                                               
Office Hours: Tues. 11-12; Wed. 3:30-5 & by appointment                           
wynn@mail.utexas.edu        

 

                    STALIN’S RUSSIA AT WAR                                

“It was the Russians who tore the guts out of the German Army.”
                                                            - Winston Churchill

 

Course Description: Violence, famine, and epidemic disease took more than fifty million Soviet lives between 1914 and 1953.  Over half of these deaths occurred between 1941 and 1945, when the Soviet Union fought the most savage and immense war in history.  No other nation ever endured anything like it.  The Soviets defeated the invading Axis powers despite the purge of the military leadership in 1937, horrible mistakes at the outset of the war, and widespread hostility within the country to the Stalinist regime.  We will focus on the impact of the Stalinist state’s brutal revolution from above, the death and destruction during the German occupation, as well as the courage and barbarism in the fight to the death on the Eastern Front, especially during the Battles of Moscow, Stalingrad, Kursk, and Berlin.  Evaluating the role of Stalin (or “Uncle Joe” as the American and British public knew him) and his inner circle, as well as what the Stalinist Revolution and “Great Patriotic War” meant for ordinary Soviets, will be of particular concern. 

Grading:  This course contains a substantial writing component.  During the course of the semester students will write four critical analyses of assigned reading, five pages in length each.  In addition, by 11:00 a.m. on most class days, students will e-mail me three questions dealing with that day’s reading.  The final grade is based on both the written assignments (60% essays; 10% questions) and the extent and quality of classroom participation (30%).  Late papers/questions will be penalized.

 

Texts: Simon Sebag Montefiore, Stalin.
           Sheila Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution.
           John Scott, Behind the Urals.
           Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.
           Lydia Chukovskaya, Sofia Petrovna.
           Richard Overy, Russia’s War.
           Catherine Merridale, Ivan’s War.
           Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.
           Grossman, Vasily, A Writer at War.
           Course Packet available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St.

 

Writing Tips:

  1. You are encouraged to discuss the topic with classmates, but the essay you write must be your own work.
  2. State your argument in your opening paragraph.  Do so quickly and concisely, and as forcefully as possible. 
  3. Support your argument by specific references to evidence from the readings.  Also confront the opposing argument and state your reasons for rejecting it.
  4. The topic sentence of each of these supporting paragraphs should state the aspect of the topic you wish to discuss. 
  5. Use the last paragraph to summarize your argument briefly.  Let it mirror your first paragraph.
  6. Avoid excessive or unnecessary detail.  You are writing for anaudience (me) who knows what happened and has done the reading.
  7. Quote to add punch.  Paraphrase otherwise.  Do not quote often oruse long quotations.
  8. Avoid the passive voice.  Write about the past in the past tense.
  9. Try to write as simply and directly as possible.  Omit needless words.
  10. Your essay, due at the beginning of class, must be typed, double-spaced, spell-checked, and grammatically correct.  Pages must be numbered.

 

             WEEKLY SCHEDULE

 

WEEK ONE: Introduction
Wednesday, January 20
Film Clip: “Why We Fight: The Battle of Russia”

 Friday, January 22
Reading: Fitzpatrick, 1-67
             *Father Gapon’s Petition

 

WEEK TWO: Revolutionary Russia
Wednesday, January 27
Reading: Fitzpatrick, 68-129
             Overy 1-12

Friday, January 29
Reading: Montefiore, 25-43
              Overy, 13-16
Film: “The Life and Times of Joseph Stalin”        

 

WEEK THREE: Forced Collectivization & Famine
Wednesday, February 3
Reading: *Hindus, “Red Bread”
              Merridale, 29-33
              Overy, 16-17, 22-23
              Fitzpatrick, 135-141

Friday, February 5
Reading: Montefiore, 3-22, 58-70, 82-101
Film: “Harvest of Despair” 

 

WEEK FOUR: Breakneck Industrialization                   
Wednesday, February 10
Reading: Scott, ix-92            
              Overy, 18-20
              Merridale, 33-43
              Fitzpatrick, 129-135

Friday, February 12
Reading: Scott, 117-170
              Fitzpatrick, 141-147

 

WEEK FIVE: The Great Terror

Wednesday, February 17: Essay #1 Due
Reading: Montefiore, 132-158
              Overy, 24-25
             *Conquest, “The Kirov Murder”
             *Knight, “1 December: The Murder”
             *Getty, “The Politics of Repression Revisited”
             *Getty, “Growing Tension in 1935”

Friday, February 19
Reading: Overy, 21-22, 24-33
              Montefiore, 159-227
              Merridale, 44-48
              Fitzpatrick, 148-172
Discussion of Film: “Burnt by the Sun”

 

WEEK SIX: Fear and Belief in the Terror
Wednesday, February 24
Reading: Chukovskaya, 1-120

Friday, February 26
Reading: Montefiore, 228-297
              Scott, 173-206

 

WEEK SEVEN: Why Confess?
Wednesday, March 3
Reading: Montefiore, 184-218
             *“Bukharin’s Letter to Stalin”
             Koestler, 1-96

Friday, March 5: Essay #2 Due
Reading: Koestler, 97-272

 

WEEK EIGHT: How War Came
Wednesday, March 10
Reading: Overy, 34-55
              Montefiore, 301-315, 326-353
              Roberts, 20-22
              Merridale, 39-48

Friday, March 12
Reading: Overy, 56-72
              Montefiore, 326-353
              Merridale, 39-81
              Roberts, 17-19, 23-26
Film Clip: “The Hour before Midnight”

           *** SPRING BREAK ***

WEEK NINE: Operation Barbarossa
Wednesday, March 24
              Overy, 73-98
              Montefiore, 363-383
              Merridale, 82-115
              Grossman, vii-64
Film Clip: “The Goths Ride East”

Friday, March 26
Reading: Overy, 99-112
              Montefiore, 384-393
              *Bidlack, “Survival Strategies” 

 

WEEK TEN: Battle of Moscow in War of Annihilation
Wednesday, March 31
Reading: Overy, 113-124
              Montefiore, 409-417
              Merridale, 116-124, 146-152
              Roberts, 39-45

Friday, April 2: Essay #3 Due
Reading: Overy, 125-153
              Roberts, 26-32
              Merridale, 125-126, 136-143, 187-225 
Film: “She Defends the Fatherland”

 

WEEK ELEVEN:  The Battle of Stalingrad
Wednesday, April 7
Reading: Overy, 154-170
              Roberts, 49-104
              Grossman, 67-131
              Merridale, 171-179
              Montefiore, 418-432

Friday, April 9
Reading: Overy, 171-189
              Roberts, 107-136
              Merridale, 179-186
              Montefiore, 435-444
              Grossman, 132-200

 

WEEK TWELVE: The Battle of Kursk and False Dawn
Wednesday, April 14
Reading: Overy, 190-222
              Montefiore, 445-478
              Merridale, 218-225
              Roberts, 139-142
              Grossman, 203-244
Film Clip: “The Citadel”

Friday, April 16
Reading: Overy, 223-244
              Merridale, 226-280
              Montefiore, 463-478
              Roberts, 143-145
              Grossman, 247-279
Discussion of film: “Come and See”

 

WEEK THIRTEEN: The Red Army in Germany
Wednesday, April 21
Reading: Overy, 251-254
              Grossman, 280-306
              Merridale, 281-298

Friday, April 23
Reading: Overy, 255-289
              Merridale, 299-335
              Roberts, 146-161
              Montefiore, 479-487
              Grossman, 309-343
              *Naimark, “The Problem of Rape”

WEEK FOURTEEN: Post-War Russia
Wednesday, April 28: Essay #4 Due             
Reading: Overy, 290-330         
              Montefiore, 491-501, 573-591, 612-625
              Merridale, 336-388
              Grossman, 344-350
Film clip: “The Fall of Berlin”

Friday, April 30
Reading: Montefiore, 638-657
Discussion of film: “Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears”

HIS 350L • Revolutionary Russia-W

40050 • Fall 2009
Meets W 400pm-700pm MEZ 1.210
(also listed as REE 335 )
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 383 • Stalinist Russia

40285 • Fall 2009
Meets F 900-1200 GAR 1.122
(also listed as REE 385 )
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May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

84925 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1130 UTC 4.122
show description

                                  HISTORY OF RUSSIA FROM 1917

                                         HIS 343M/REE 335

 

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

 

 

HIS 343M • History Of Russia Since 1917

39040 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 UTC 4.112
show description

                                  HISTORY OF RUSSIA FROM 1917

                                         HIS 343M/REE 335

 

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

 

 

HIS 350L • Stalin's Russia At War-W

39195 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 2.124
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

Publications

Wynn, C. (2007, December) Review of Russia's Revolutionary Experience, 1905-1917: Two Essays. Journal of Modern History 79(4), 956-957.

Wynn, C. (1992) Workers, Strikes, and Pogroms: The Donbass-Dnepr Bend in Late Imperial Russia, 1870-1905. Princeton University Press.

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