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Alan Tully, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Prof. publishes three books on Atlantic history

Posted: October 20, 2006

Nature, Empire, and Nation, a collection of essays, explores the different ways nature was interpreted and manipulated in the early modern Iberian world. Focusing on the history of early modern science in Spain and Spanish America, it covers a wide range of topics, including botany, cosmography, ecology, and race. According to Dr. Richard Kagan of Johns Hopkins University, it is “pathbreaking and provocative throughout,” representing “revisionist history at its best.”

In Puritan Conquistadors, Dr. Cañizares-Esguerra presents a compelling case for the common characteristics of Spanish and Puritan colonization in the early Atlantic world, breaking away from the traditional viewpoint focusing on the differences between Puritan and Catholic colonization.

Both, he argues, shared a desire to exorcise demons from the New World, and the Puritan colonization of New England was as much of a crusade against the Devil as was the Spanish conquest. Dr. Stuart Clark, author of Thinking with Demons, describes Puritan Conquistadors as “the most comprehensive and exciting version yet of the ‘satanization’ theory of early colonization as applied demonology.” Bernard Bailyn refers to it as a “remarkable work in Atlantic History.”

Dr. Cañizares-Esguerra has also, along with Dr. Erik Seeman, edited The Atlantic in Global History, a reader compiling essays on Atlantic studies with a focus on the global influences on the region. According to Dr. Alan Galley of Ohio State University, “This superb collection of essays . . . represents the best in Atlantic studies.”

These are three important contributions to the burgeoning field of Atlantic studies.

Related Links:
Professor Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra
Puritan ConquistadorsOffsite Link
Nature, Empire, and NationOffsite Link
The Atlantic in Global HistoryOffsite Link

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