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Anthony C. Woodbury, Chair CLA 4.304, Mailcode B5100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1701

Megan J. Crowhurst

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Arizona

Megan J. Crowhurst

Contact

LIN 350 • Rhythm/Meter Folk Chant/Mus

40060 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.120
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Even to casual observers, it is apparent that rhythm plays a special and most likely universal role in verbal art forms such as song, chant, and poetry. A vast body of work has explored this relationship in "higher" art forms. A body of work in linguistics (as well as anthropology and musicology) has examined the role of rhythm and meter in popular forms, such as English nursery rhymes, folk chants, and traditional ballads, and has found that rhythm in these popular verbal art forms is highly structured, and that the inventory of available forms is limited to only a few possible combinations. Of further interest, some work suggests that the rhythmic forms used by a diverse (and unrelated) set of languages are surprisingly similar. Moreover, experimental work on rhythm and meter in psycholinguistics suggests similarities in the way that humans process rhythm, regardless of cultural and linguistic factors, and even for infants too young to have acquired a first language. Together, such findings suggest that the rhythmic possibilities for popular (or folk) verbal art forms are determined, at least in part, by the architecture of the human cognitive system. This course will examine popular rhythmic forms (nursery rhymes, folk chants, traditional ballads, and other folk music forms) as well as some of the psycholinguistic and linguistic work on rhythm that can help us understand these popular forms.

LIN 392 • Tools For Prosodic Analysis

40160 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.106
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This course is conceived as a practical, hands on course for students who are or will be conducting empirical research in language prosody, especially in the areas of syllable structure, stress, accent, and/or intonation.  The central goal of the course is to advance student research.  To this end, the class will be balanced between the development of student projects and supportive reading from the published literature.  This class may be especially useful for students who are already working on a sounds (phonology, phonetics, psycholinguistic) project that involves the collection and analysis of original data.  The seminar will aim to provide a supportive and challenging environment within which to move research-in-progress forward, whatever its current stage.  Students who are not currently working on a sounds project may use the seminar to design and conduct such a project, with the goal of gathering original data (and processing it, where possible) over the course of the semester.  Dr. Crowhurst encourages interested students to contact her at mcrowhurst@austin.utexas.edu to discuss whether this course would be a good fit for them.

LIN 372K • Sound Patterns: Sound To Word

41120 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.124
show description

Phonology is the study of the distribution of speech sound categories, i.e. what sounds can go where in an utterance. It is an important aspect of what you know when you know how to speak a language.

In this course, students will learn to recognize phonological patterns in language data, state such patterns precisely, and represent them in a formal model. We will explore prosodic patterns, which are how sounds are organized into larger units such as syllables, stress feet, phonological words, and phonological phrases. We will also consider how phonological patterns arise out of variation in production and perception, how knowledge of phonological patterns influences speech production and perception.

Grading Policy
The grade will be based on homework assignments (roughly one a week), and two tests.

Texts
There is no textbook for this course.

LIN 380K • Phonology I

41160 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.118
show description

This course is an introduction to phonology for graduate students. It presupposes no knowledge of either phonetics or phonology. It consists of three parts.In the first part, we will survey the sounds of the world's languages: how they are made, and what they sound like. Students will learn to transcribe a broad range of speech sounds. In the second part of the course, we will explore patterns of distribution of speech sound categories, i.e. restrictions on what sounds go where. Students will learn to discover such patterns in data and analyze them within a formal model.  In the third part, we will we will explore prosody, beginning with how speech sounds are grouped into syllables, and typical phonological phenomena associated with this process.Grading PolicyThe grade will be based on homework assignments (about one a week), two tests (one at the end of each of the first two sections), and a small lab project in the third section.TextsTextbook.Hayes, Bruce.  2009. Introductory Phonology. Blackwell.

LIN 381K • Phonology II

41545 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.108
show description

This course is a continuation of Lin 380K (Phonology I), and completes a two-course introduction to phonology, the study of sound patterns in language. Lin 380K emphasized the basics of phonology – the distribution of sound properties in natural languages, how to identify sound patterns, and how to describe and interpret these patterns in the theory-neutral terms that any linguist must be able to articulate. In Lin 381K, we will continue the themes of distribution and pattern analysis taught in Lin 380K, and you will learn the basics of Optimality Theory (OT), currently the predominant formal framework used by phonologists. Using OT, you will learn to construct analyses that represent in formal terms your basic interpretations of sound patterns. We will also incorporate some of the literature from experimental approaches to phonology (laboratory phonology and psycholinguistics). The broad focus of this semester’s work will be prosody. Course content will be structured into 3 units of 4-6 weeks each.

LIN 372K • Sound Patterns: Sound To Word

41355 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 2.124
show description

This course is an undergraduate level introduction to phonological patterns found in the world's languages. Phonology is the study of how sounds behave (inventories of sounds, how they are distributed, and how they influence one another) in spoken human languages. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving. Students will learn how to identify phonological patterns in data, to describe these patterns in theory-neutral terms, and how to analyze them. Other important skills to be developed are fundamental to the construction of solid arguments: learning to identify proper evidence for a particular analysis, constructing an argument for a particular analysis (point of view) based on the evidence, identifying advantages and disadvantages of an analysis, and comparing a proposed analysis with potential alternatives. This class is a core program requirement for linguistics majors and is therefore quite specialized. However, the pattern-identification and argument building skills we focus on are broadly general and valuable beyond their specialized application in linguistic studies.

LIN 372K • Sound Patterns: Sound To Word

40990 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 2.124
show description

This course is an undergraduate level introduction to phonological patterns found in the world's languages. Phonology is the study of how sounds behave (inventories of sounds, how they are distributed, and how they influence one another) in spoken human languages. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving. Students will learn how to identify phonological patterns in data, to describe these patterns in theory-neutral terms, and how to analyze them. Other important skills to be developed are fundamental to the construction of solid arguments: learning to identify proper evidence for a particular analysis, constructing an argument for a particular analysis (point of view) based on the evidence, identifying advantages and disadvantages of an analysis, and comparing a proposed analysis with potential alternatives. This class is a core program requirement for linguistics majors and is therefore quite specialized. However, the pattern-identification and argument building skills we focus on are broadly general and valuable beyond their specialized application in linguistic studies.

LIN 381K • Phonology II

41015 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 2.128
show description

This course is a continuation of Lin 380K (Phonology I), and completes a two-course introduction to phonology, the study of sound patterns in language. Lin 380K emphasized the basics of phonology – the distribution of sound properties in natural languages, how to identify sound patterns, and how to describe and interpret these patterns in the theory-neutral terms that any linguist must be able to articulate. In Lin 381K, we will continue the themes of distribution and pattern analysis taught in Lin 380K, and you will learn the basics of Optimality Theory (OT), currently the predominant formal framework used by phonologists. Using OT, you will learn to construct analyses that represent in formal terms your basic interpretations of sound patterns. We will also incorporate some of the literature from experimental approaches to phonology (laboratory phonology and psycholinguistics). The broad focus of this semester’s work will be prosody. Course content will be structured into 3 units of 4-6 weeks each.

LIN 372K • Sound Patterns: Sound To Word

40790 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 2.124
show description

This course is an undergraduate level introduction to phonological patterns found in the world's languages. Phonology is the study of how sounds behave (inventories of sounds, how they are distributed, and how they influence one another) in spoken human languages. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving. Students will learn how to identify phonological patterns in data, to describe these patterns in theory-neutral terms, and how to analyze them. Other important skills to be developed are fundamental to the construction of solid arguments: learning to identify proper evidence for a particular analysis, constructing an argument for a particular analysis (point of view) based on the evidence, identifying advantages and disadvantages of an analysis, and comparing a proposed analysis with potential alternatives. This class is a core program requirement for linguistics majors and is therefore quite specialized. However, the pattern-identification and argument building skills we focus on are broadly general and valuable beyond their specialized application in linguistic studies.

LIN 393P • Topics In Phonology: Prosody

40885 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 210
show description

This seminar will be a selective survey of the literature on language prosody.  The study of “language prosody” is a broad area that includes numerous phenomena, among them syllables and syllable typology; stress, tone and intonation; prosodic morphology; rhythm and generative metrics; the interaction between morpho-syntax and multiple layers of phonological structure above the word.  Any of these topics can be approached from multiple angles – for example, descriptive, from the perspective of formal phonological theory (for example OT) or phonetics, to the psycholinguistic, for a start.  All human languages have prosodic characteristics, and while most of the research on prosody has been done on oral languages, a smaller but growing research tradition studies prosodic features of signed languages.

Given the varied interests represented in the seminar’s potential audience at UT, the following are some topics that might be emphasized:

•    The interaction between stress, (pitch) accent, and tone.

•    Generative metrics:  the interface between natural language prosody and musical rhythm and/or poetic language, in particular vernacular forms of verse.

•    Prosodic morphology (for example, reduplication, truncation, prosodic constraints on word-formation).

•    The prosody of signed languages.

•    The psycholinguistics of prosody: the importance of prosodic features in the acquisition of a first language by children and in speech processing.

The instructor’s current research focus, on the perception of rhythm, revolves around questions such as the following:  What cues do listeners use in making subjective decisions about how rhythmically alternating sound events should be grouped?  To what extent can common tendencies be identified in crosslinguistic studies?  How can any perceptual tendencies we observe be connected to the stress patterns of listeners’ languages, specifically, and to the prosodic foot typology, more generally? The makeup of the course will reflect this interest, and will be further determined by the interests of the other participants.

LIN 381K • Phonology II

40855 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 2.118
show description

This course is a continuation of Lin 380K (Phonology I), and completes a two-course introduction to phonology, the study of sound patterns in language. Lin 380K emphasized the basics of phonology – the distribution of sound properties in natural languages, how to identify sound patterns, and how to describe and interpret these patterns in the theory-neutral terms that any linguist must be able to articulate. In Lin 381K, we will continue the themes of distribution and pattern analysis taught in Lin 380K, and you will learn the basics of Optimality Theory (OT), currently the predominant formal framework used by phonologists. Using OT, you will learn to construct analyses that represent in formal terms your basic interpretations of sound patterns. We will also incorporate some of the literature from experimental approaches to phonology (laboratory phonology and psycholinguistics). The broad focus of this semester’s work will be prosody. Course content will be structured into 3 units of 4-6 weeks each.

LIN 372K • Sound Patterns: Sound To Word

41155 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 301
show description

This course is an undergraduate level introduction to phonological patterns found in the world's languages. Phonology is the study of how sounds behave (inventories of sounds, how they are distributed, and how they influence one another) in spoken human languages. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving. Students will learn how to identify phonological patterns in data, to describe these patterns in theory-neutral terms, and how to analyze them. Other important skills to be developed are fundamental to the construction of solid arguments: learning to identify proper evidence for a particular analysis, constructing an argument for a particular analysis (point of view) based on the evidence, identifying advantages and disadvantages of an analysis, and comparing a proposed analysis with potential alternatives. This class is a core program requirement for linguistics majors and is therefore quite specialized. However, the pattern-identification and argument building skills we focus on are broadly general and valuable beyond their specialized application in linguistic studies.

LIN 380K • Phonology I

40785 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 301
show description

Course Description

This course is an introduction to phonology for graduate students. It presupposes no knowledge of either phonetics or phonology. It consists of three parts.

In the first part, we will survey the sounds of the world's languages: how they are made, and what they sound like. Students will learn to transcribe a broad range of speech sounds. In the second part of the course, we will explore patterns of distribution of speech sound categories, i.e. restrictions on what sounds go where. Students will learn to discover such patterns in data and analyze them within a formal model.  In the third part, we will we will explore prosody, beginning with how speech sounds are grouped into syllables, and typical phonological phenomena associated with this process.

Grading Policy

The grade will be based on homework assignments (about one a week), two tests (one at the end of each of the first two sections), and a small lab project in the third section.
Texts

Textbook.

Hayes, Bruce.  2009. Introductory Phonology. Blackwell.

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

40860 • Fall 2010
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CBA 4.342
show description

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

85785 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am PAR 306
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. In what ways do languages differ? In what ways are languages the same? How do languages change over time? Why do languages change? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communicating? Do dolphins speak? How do children learn language, and how do adults learn language? Does language control our view of reality? How does language interact with social class? What kind of language should be taught in schools? What language problems do other countries have? What are the different language families of the world? The course will deal with sociolinguistics (language in society), historical linguistics (language change and language relationships), and formal linguistics. Basic material covered under formal linguistics includes phonetics (the properties of speech sounds), phonology (the systematic sound patterns of language), morphology (the grammatical structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), and semantics/pragmatics (the meaning and use of words and sentences).

Texts

Finegan, E. 1999. Language: its structure and use. 5th edition.

LIN 381K • Phonology II

41215 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 210
show description

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 392 • Morphology

41265 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CBA 4.326
show description

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 372 • Sound Patterns: Sound To Word

41524 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 PAR 301
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Lin 372K is an undergraduate level introduction to phonological patterns found in the world’s languages. Phonology is the study of the ways in which languages organize their sound systems. Just as there are basic principles that determine a language’s syntactic structure, there are principles governing sound behaviour. That is, each language has its own sound “grammar”. We take a broadly typological view in our approach, which is to say that we are interested in how the sound patterns of individual languages are similar, and how they vary across languages. For this reason, this class will look at data from a broad sample of languages, and not just from English.

Some of the topics we will cover.

In this class we will begin with a brief review of the parameters we use for classifying the speech sounds that are used in human languages. Note: we will not spend time covering sounds of the world’s languages in detail. This material was covered in Lin 344K, and it is the basis for the material covered in this class. The first chapter in Course pack 1 is a review.

After this, we’ll move on to a survey of common relationships among sounds, and how they Interact. For example:

          • Natural classes: how speech sounds fall into natural groups, based on common properties and like  behaviour; how we formally characterize natural sound classes.

          • Patterns of sound distribution in languages, and what distributional patterns mean for the cognitive representation of sounds.

          • Assimilation: sound patterns in which one sound becomes more like another sound in its environment, in some respect.

          • Dissimilation: one sound becomes less like another similar sound in its environment.

          • How sounds group together to form larger units, like syllables.

          • Prosody: Stress (or word accent), intonation, tone (time permitting).

          • The formal analysis of sound patterns -Optimality Theory.

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 372K • Sound Patterns: Sound-Word-W

41525 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 PAR 301
show description

Phonology is the study of the distribution of speech sound categories, i.e. what sounds can go where in an utterance. It is an important aspect of what you know when you know how to speak a language.

In this course, students will learn to recognize phonological patterns in language data, state such patterns precisely, and represent them in a formal model. We will explore prosodic patterns, which are how sounds are organized into larger units such as syllables, stress feet, phonological words, and phonological phrases. We will also consider how phonological patterns arise out of variation in production and perception, how knowledge of phonological patterns influences speech production and perception.

Grading Policy
The grade will be based on homework assignments (roughly one a week), and two tests.

Texts
There is no textbook for this course.

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

41650 • Fall 2009
Meets TH 600pm-900pm MEZ 1.212
show description

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

85575 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1130 PAR 306
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

Publications

Crowhurst, Megan J. 2008. “Bolivia: Language Situation”, in Keith Brown (Editor-in-Chief)
Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd Edition, Oxford: Elsevier Publishers.

Crowhurst, Megan J. & L. Michael. 2005. “Iterative footing and prominence driven stress in
Nanti (Kampa).” Language 81, 47-95.

Munshi, S. & M. Crowhurst. 2004. “Kashmiri Stress,” South Asian Linguistic Association Roundtable XXIII.

Crowhurst, Megan J. 2004. “Mora Alignment,” Natural Language & Linguistic Theory 22,
127-177.

Crowhurst, Megan J. 2003. “Comparative markedness and identity effects in
Reduplication,” Theoretical linguistics 29, 77-87.

Crowhurst, Megan J. 2002a. “Un intercambio de vocales altas en el sirionó (tupí-guaraní),” Revista Linguas Indigenas do América do Sul, Vol. 2 Campinas, Brazil: UNICAMP. pp. 7-29. [Substantial revision and translation into Spanish of Crowhurst 2000.]

**Crowhurst, Megan J. 2001a. “Coda conditions and Um infixation in Toba Batak,” Lingua 111, 561-590.

Crowhurst, Megan J. 2000. "A Flip-Flop in Sirionó (Tupian): The mutual exchange of /i +/,” International Journal of American Linguistics 66, 57-75.

Echols, C. H., & Crowhurst, Megan J. 1998. "Developing knowledge of metrical rhythm in infancy.’ In M. C. Gruber, D. Higgins, K. Olsen, & T. Wysocki (Eds.), Chicago Linguistic Society 34, Vol II: The Panels. Chicago Linguistic Society, Chicago.

Crowhurst, Megan J. 1998. "Um Infixation and Prefixation in Toba Batak," Language 74, 590-604.

Echols, C.H., M. J. Crowhurst, & J. Childers. 1997. "The Perception of Rhythmic Units in Speech by Infants and Adults", Journal of Memory & Language 36, 202-225.

Hewitt, Mark & Megan J. Crowhurst. 1996. "Conjunctive Constraints and Templates in Optimality Theory," Proceedings of the North East Linguistic Society 26 , Graduate Linguistics Student Association, Amherst, MA, pp. 101-116.

Crowhurst, Megan J. 1996. "An Optimal Alternative to Conflation," Phonology 13, 409-424.

Crowhurst, M.J. & M. Hewitt. 1995. "Prosodic Overlay & Headless Feet in Yidiny", Phonology 12, 39-85.

Crowhurst, Megan J. & Mark Hewitt. 1995. "Directional footing, Degeneracy, and Alignment," in J. Beckman, (ed.), Proceedings of North East Linguistic Society 25, vol. 1 , Graduate Linguistics Student Association, Amherst, MA, pp. 47-61.

Crowhurst, Megan J. 1994. "Foot Extrametricality and Template Mapping in Cupeño," Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 12, 177-201.

Crowhurst, M.J. 1994. "Prosodic Alignment and Misalignment in Diyari, Dyirbal, and Gooniyandi: An Optimizing Approach", in R. Aranovich et al (eds.), Proceedings of the West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics 13, Stanford Linguistics Assoc., Stanford, 16-31.

Crowhurst, Megan J. 1993. "Diminutives and Augmentatives in Mexican Spanish: A Prosodic Analysis," Phonology 9, 231-253.

Crowhurst, Megan J. 1991. “Demorafication,” in T. Sherer (ed.) Proceedings of the North East Linguistics Society 21, Graduate Linguistics Student Assoc., Amherst, MA, pp. 49-64.

DISSERTATION: Crowhurst, Megan J. (1991). Minimality and Foot Structure in Metrical Phonology and Prosodic Morphology. Published 1992 by Indiana University Linguistics Club, Bloomington.

Crowhurst, Megan J. 1988. “Empty consonants and direct prosody,” in H. Borer (ed.) Proceedings of the West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics 7 , Stanford Linguistics Assoc., Stanford, pp. 67-79.

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