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Anthony C. Woodbury, Chair CLA 4.304, Mailcode B5100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1701

David I Beaver

Professor PhD, Edinburgh

Professor, Director of the Cognitive Science Program
David I Beaver

Contact

  • Phone: 471-9028
  • Office: CLA 4.708
  • Campus Mail Code: B5100

Biography

I am a Professor in the Linguistics and Philosophy Departments at The University of Texas at Austin, and Director of the Cognitive Science Program.

My research and teaching concerns linguistic meaning, an area traditionally subdivided into two subfields, semantics and pragmatics. The methodologies I use include computational studies of large corpora of text, experimental work, and theoretical modeling using tools from logic and statistics. The main empirical topics I have worked on are presupposition (how what we take for granted is reflected in what we say), anaphora (how words like pronouns pick up their meaning from prior context), and topic/focus (the way that we use melody and other linguistic features to indicate what question is being addressed and what the answer is). I also have interests in temporal and event semantics, in the automatic extraction of psychological and social features in text and dialogue, and in broader philosophical, psychological and computational themes from cognitive science.

CGS 380 • Intro To Cognitive Science

33840 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SEA 2.108
(also listed as LIN 392, PHL 383C )
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Course Description

An introduction to cognitive science, the new discipline emerging from the interaction of psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology. The course will range broadly, examining a variety of approaches to the study of how humans and other intelligent systems represent, reason, understand, perceive, use language, learn, and plan purposeful actions. The central assumption is that the human mind is fundamentally a computational organ and that cognitive processes can be explicitly modeled. The course will cover the basic issues and contributions in the field, with particular emphasis on current research at UT. There will be frequent lectures by faculty from the relevant disciplines who are engaged in such research. Major topics in the course will include: * Neuroscience: systems neuroscience, functional brain mapping, relating localized brain damage to spared and damaged abilities, evolutionary biology. * Reasoning, Concepts, and Conceptual Development: categorization, children's theories of mind, nonmonotonic reasoning, qualitative reasoning, problem solving, mental models, schemas. * Computational Approaches: modularity, connectionism, symbol manipulation, knowledge representation, machine learning. * Language: speech perception, sentence parsing, natural language understanding, discourse representation, language acquisition, syntax. * Vision: computational theory, psychology of visual perception, visual imagination, attention, spatial reasoning. * Other Topics: Memory, Philosophy of Mind, Robotics, Implicit Knowledge, Emotion, Learning. Class will meet once a week for three hours with a break. Often we will have guest lecturers from around the University who are interested in Cognitive Science. These researchers will present aspects of their own work and its relationship to Cognitive Science as a whole. In addition, we will have periodic classes devoted to discussions of foundational issues in Cognitive Science. Class participation is important to this class, as it is to most seminars. Students are expected to do the readings each week and to come prepared to talk about issues related to those readings. While there will be guest speakers each week, it will always be appropriate to ask questions.

Grading Policy Grades will be assigned based on these factors: * 50%: Class attendance and participation, questions inspired by readings, and commentaries. Over the course of the semester, each student may miss 1.5 classes without penalty. Not participating in the class discussion is only marginally better than not attending class. Each class you will bring in two questions related to the assigned readings along with a short paragraph discussing what motivates the questions. * 10%: Homework and quizzes * 40%: Final project - cogsci grant application Policy on incompletes. No incompletes will be given. Policy on independence of work and plagiarism: You are encouraged to discuss the material presented in class with other students. All written work turned in by a student must be the independent work of that student. In the case of the collaborative projects, of course, the work must be the work only of the members of the group. Obviously, you are not to include text that you have not written without clear quotations and attributions of the original source.

Texts None.  Additional Materials Every week there will be additional readings. These readings will be available online as pdf files.

LIN 380M • Semantics

41170 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.108
(also listed as PHL 391 )
show description

This is a graduate introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics, introducing students to basic logic, compositional interpretation, and the strategic reasoning involved in deciding what people mean by what they say. By the end, you should be able to follow a substantial portion of current work in the area. Topics covered include different notions of inference and entailment, presupposition, implicature, ambiguity, set theory, propositional logic, first order logic, lambda calculus for compositional interpretation, extraction and binding, quantification and generalized quantifiers , pronouns and ellipsis, basic dynamic semantics, basic intensionality and modality, event semantics, and tense and aspect.Grading PolicyThere will be assignments each week (40%), two reviews of recent journal papers (20%), and a take-home final (30%), plus a class participation component (10%).TextsIrene Helm and Angelika Kratzer. Semantics in Generative Grammar. Blackwell 1998.

LIN 392 • Intro To Cognitive Science

41200 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SEA 2.108
(also listed as CGS 380, PHL 383C )
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Course Description

An introduction to cognitive science, the new discipline emerging from the interaction of psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology. The course will range broadly, examining a variety of approaches to the study of how humans and other intelligent systems represent, reason, understand, perceive, use language, learn, and plan purposeful actions. The central assumption is that the human mind is fundamentally a computational organ and that cognitive processes can be explicitly modeled. The course will cover the basic issues and contributions in the field, with particular emphasis on current research at UT. There will be frequent lectures by faculty from the relevant disciplines who are engaged in such research. Major topics in the course will include: * Neuroscience: systems neuroscience, functional brain mapping, relating localized brain damage to spared and damaged abilities, evolutionary biology. * Reasoning, Concepts, and Conceptual Development: categorization, children's theories of mind, nonmonotonic reasoning, qualitative reasoning, problem solving, mental models, schemas. * Computational Approaches: modularity, connectionism, symbol manipulation, knowledge representation, machine learning. * Language: speech perception, sentence parsing, natural language understanding, discourse representation, language acquisition, syntax. * Vision: computational theory, psychology of visual perception, visual imagination, attention, spatial reasoning. * Other Topics: Memory, Philosophy of Mind, Robotics, Implicit Knowledge, Emotion, Learning. Class will meet once a week for three hours with a break. Often we will have guest lecturers from around the University who are interested in Cognitive Science. These researchers will present aspects of their own work and its relationship to Cognitive Science as a whole. In addition, we will have periodic classes devoted to discussions of foundational issues in Cognitive Science. Class participation is important to this class, as it is to most seminars. Students are expected to do the readings each week and to come prepared to talk about issues related to those readings. While there will be guest speakers each week, it will always be appropriate to ask questions.

Grading Policy Grades will be assigned based on these factors: * 50%: Class attendance and participation, questions inspired by readings, and commentaries. Over the course of the semester, each student may miss 1.5 classes without penalty. Not participating in the class discussion is only marginally better than not attending class. Each class you will bring in two questions related to the assigned readings along with a short paragraph discussing what motivates the questions. * 10%: Homework and quizzes * 40%: Final project - cogsci grant application Policy on incompletes. No incompletes will be given. Policy on independence of work and plagiarism: You are encouraged to discuss the material presented in class with other students. All written work turned in by a student must be the independent work of that student. In the case of the collaborative projects, of course, the work must be the work only of the members of the group. Obviously, you are not to include text that you have not written without clear quotations and attributions of the original source.

Texts None.  Additional Materials Every week there will be additional readings. These readings will be available online as pdf files.

CGS 380 • Intro To Cognitive Science

33865 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SZB 426
(also listed as LIN 392, PHL 383C )
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Course Description

An introduction to cognitive science, the new discipline emerging from the interaction of psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology. The course will range broadly, examining a variety of approaches to the study of how humans and other intelligent systems represent, reason, understand, perceive, use language, learn, and plan purposeful actions. The central assumption is that the human mind is fundamentally a computational organ and that cognitive processes can be explicitly modeled. The course will cover the basic issues and contributions in the field, with particular emphasis on current research at UT. There will be frequent lectures by faculty from the relevant disciplines who are engaged in such research. Major topics in the course will include: * Neuroscience: systems neuroscience, functional brain mapping, relating localized brain damage to spared and damaged abilities, evolutionary biology. * Reasoning, Concepts, and Conceptual Development: categorization, children's theories of mind, nonmonotonic reasoning, qualitative reasoning, problem solving, mental models, schemas. * Computational Approaches: modularity, connectionism, symbol manipulation, knowledge representation, machine learning. * Language: speech perception, sentence parsing, natural language understanding, discourse representation, language acquisition, syntax. * Vision: computational theory, psychology of visual perception, visual imagination, attention, spatial reasoning. * Other Topics: Memory, Philosophy of Mind, Robotics, Implicit Knowledge, Emotion, Learning. Class will meet once a week for three hours with a break. Often we will have guest lecturers from around the University who are interested in Cognitive Science. These researchers will present aspects of their own work and its relationship to Cognitive Science as a whole. In addition, we will have periodic classes devoted to discussions of foundational issues in Cognitive Science. Class participation is important to this class, as it is to most seminars. Students are expected to do the readings each week and to come prepared to talk about issues related to those readings. While there will be guest speakers each week, it will always be appropriate to ask questions.

Grading Policy Grades will be assigned based on these factors: * 50%: Class attendance and participation, questions inspired by readings, and commentaries. Over the course of the semester, each student may miss 1.5 classes without penalty. Not participating in the class discussion is only marginally better than not attending class. Each class you will bring in two questions related to the assigned readings along with a short paragraph discussing what motivates the questions. * 10%: Homework and quizzes * 40%: Final project - cogsci grant application Policy on incompletes. No incompletes will be given. Policy on independence of work and plagiarism: You are encouraged to discuss the material presented in class with other students. All written work turned in by a student must be the independent work of that student. In the case of the collaborative projects, of course, the work must be the work only of the members of the group. Obviously, you are not to include text that you have not written without clear quotations and attributions of the original source.

Texts None.  Additional Materials Every week there will be additional readings. These readings will be available online as pdf files.

LIN 380M • Semantics I

41400 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.108
show description

This is a graduate introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics, introducing students to basic logic, compositional interpretation, and the strategic reasoning involved in deciding what people mean by what they say. By the end, you should be able to follow a substantial portion of current work in the area. Topics covered include different notions of inference and entailment, presupposition, implicature, ambiguity, set theory, propositional logic, first order logic, lambda calculus for compositional interpretation, extraction and binding, quantification and generalized quantifiers , pronouns and ellipsis, basic dynamic semantics, basic intensionality and modality, event semantics, and tense and aspect.Grading PolicyThere will be assignments each week (40%), two reviews of recent journal papers (20%), and a take-home final (30%), plus a class participation component (10%).TextsIrene Helm and Angelika Kratzer. Semantics in Generative Grammar. Blackwell 1998.

LIN 392 • Intro To Cognitive Science

41420 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SZB 426
(also listed as CGS 380, PHL 383C )
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Course Description

An introduction to cognitive science, the new discipline emerging from the interaction of psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology. The course will range broadly, examining a variety of approaches to the study of how humans and other intelligent systems represent, reason, understand, perceive, use language, learn, and plan purposeful actions. The central assumption is that the human mind is fundamentally a computational organ and that cognitive processes can be explicitly modeled. The course will cover the basic issues and contributions in the field, with particular emphasis on current research at UT. There will be frequent lectures by faculty from the relevant disciplines who are engaged in such research. Major topics in the course will include: * Neuroscience: systems neuroscience, functional brain mapping, relating localized brain damage to spared and damaged abilities, evolutionary biology. * Reasoning, Concepts, and Conceptual Development: categorization, children's theories of mind, nonmonotonic reasoning, qualitative reasoning, problem solving, mental models, schemas. * Computational Approaches: modularity, connectionism, symbol manipulation, knowledge representation, machine learning. * Language: speech perception, sentence parsing, natural language understanding, discourse representation, language acquisition, syntax. * Vision: computational theory, psychology of visual perception, visual imagination, attention, spatial reasoning. * Other Topics: Memory, Philosophy of Mind, Robotics, Implicit Knowledge, Emotion, Learning. Class will meet once a week for three hours with a break. Often we will have guest lecturers from around the University who are interested in Cognitive Science. These researchers will present aspects of their own work and its relationship to Cognitive Science as a whole. In addition, we will have periodic classes devoted to discussions of foundational issues in Cognitive Science. Class participation is important to this class, as it is to most seminars. Students are expected to do the readings each week and to come prepared to talk about issues related to those readings. While there will be guest speakers each week, it will always be appropriate to ask questions.

Grading Policy Grades will be assigned based on these factors: * 50%: Class attendance and participation, questions inspired by readings, and commentaries. Over the course of the semester, each student may miss 1.5 classes without penalty. Not participating in the class discussion is only marginally better than not attending class. Each class you will bring in two questions related to the assigned readings along with a short paragraph discussing what motivates the questions. * 10%: Homework and quizzes * 40%: Final project - cogsci grant application Policy on incompletes. No incompletes will be given. Policy on independence of work and plagiarism: You are encouraged to discuss the material presented in class with other students. All written work turned in by a student must be the independent work of that student. In the case of the collaborative projects, of course, the work must be the work only of the members of the group. Obviously, you are not to include text that you have not written without clear quotations and attributions of the original source.

Texts None.  Additional Materials Every week there will be additional readings. These readings will be available online as pdf files.

CGS 380 • Intro To Cognitive Science

33490 • Fall 2011
Meets F 900am-1200pm SEA 4.242
(also listed as LIN 392, PHL 383C, PSY 394U )
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Course Description

An introduction to cognitive science, the new discipline emerging from the interaction of psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology. The course will range broadly, examining a variety of approaches to the study of how humans and other intelligent systems represent, reason, understand, perceive, use language, learn, and plan purposeful actions. The central assumption is that the human mind is fundamentally a computational organ and that cognitive processes can be explicitly modeled. The course will cover the basic issues and contributions in the field, with particular emphasis on current research at UT. There will be frequent lectures by faculty from the relevant disciplines who are engaged in such research. Major topics in the course will include: * Neuroscience: systems neuroscience, functional brain mapping, relating localized brain damage to spared and damaged abilities, evolutionary biology. * Reasoning, Concepts, and Conceptual Development: categorization, children's theories of mind, nonmonotonic reasoning, qualitative reasoning, problem solving, mental models, schemas. * Computational Approaches: modularity, connectionism, symbol manipulation, knowledge representation, machine learning. * Language: speech perception, sentence parsing, natural language understanding, discourse representation, language acquisition, syntax. * Vision: computational theory, psychology of visual perception, visual imagination, attention, spatial reasoning. * Other Topics: Memory, Philosophy of Mind, Robotics, Implicit Knowledge, Emotion, Learning. Class will meet once a week for three hours with a break. Often we will have guest lecturers from around the University who are interested in Cognitive Science. These researchers will present aspects of their own work and its relationship to Cognitive Science as a whole. In addition, we will have periodic classes devoted to discussions of foundational issues in Cognitive Science. Class participation is important to this class, as it is to most seminars. Students are expected to do the readings each week and to come prepared to talk about issues related to those readings. While there will be guest speakers each week, it will always be appropriate to ask questions.

Grading Policy Grades will be assigned based on these factors: * 50%: Class attendance and participation, questions inspired by readings, and commentaries. Over the course of the semester, each student may miss 1.5 classes without penalty. Not participating in the class discussion is only marginally better than not attending class. Each class you will bring in two questions related to the assigned readings along with a short paragraph discussing what motivates the questions. * 10%: Homework and quizzes * 40%: Final project - cogsci grant application Policy on incompletes. No incompletes will be given. Policy on independence of work and plagiarism: You are encouraged to discuss the material presented in class with other students. All written work turned in by a student must be the independent work of that student. In the case of the collaborative projects, of course, the work must be the work only of the members of the group. Obviously, you are not to include text that you have not written without clear quotations and attributions of the original source.

Texts None.  Additional Materials Every week there will be additional readings. These readings will be available online as pdf files.

LIN 380M • Semantics I

40770 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BEN 1.124
show description

This is a graduate introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics, introducing students to basic logic, compositional interpretation, and the strategic reasoning involved in deciding what people mean by what they say. By the end, you should be able to follow a substantial portion of current work in the area. Topics covered include different notions of inference and entailment, presupposition, implicature, ambiguity, set theory, propositional logic, first order logic, lambda calculus for compositional interpretation, extraction and binding, quantification and generalized quantifiers , pronouns and ellipsis, basic dynamic semantics, basic intensionality and modality, event semantics, and tense and aspect.Grading PolicyThere will be assignments each week (40%), two reviews of recent journal papers (20%), and a take-home final (30%), plus a class participation component (10%).TextsIrene Helm and Angelika Kratzer. Semantics in Generative Grammar. Blackwell 1998.

LIN 392 • Intro To Cognitive Science

40800 • Fall 2011
Meets F 900am-1200pm SEA 4.242
(also listed as CGS 380, PHL 383C, PSY 394U )
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Course Description

An introduction to cognitive science, the new discipline emerging from the interaction of psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology. The course will range broadly, examining a variety of approaches to the study of how humans and other intelligent systems represent, reason, understand, perceive, use language, learn, and plan purposeful actions. The central assumption is that the human mind is fundamentally a computational organ and that cognitive processes can be explicitly modeled. The course will cover the basic issues and contributions in the field, with particular emphasis on current research at UT. There will be frequent lectures by faculty from the relevant disciplines who are engaged in such research. Major topics in the course will include: * Neuroscience: systems neuroscience, functional brain mapping, relating localized brain damage to spared and damaged abilities, evolutionary biology. * Reasoning, Concepts, and Conceptual Development: categorization, children's theories of mind, nonmonotonic reasoning, qualitative reasoning, problem solving, mental models, schemas. * Computational Approaches: modularity, connectionism, symbol manipulation, knowledge representation, machine learning. * Language: speech perception, sentence parsing, natural language understanding, discourse representation, language acquisition, syntax. * Vision: computational theory, psychology of visual perception, visual imagination, attention, spatial reasoning. * Other Topics: Memory, Philosophy of Mind, Robotics, Implicit Knowledge, Emotion, Learning. Class will meet once a week for three hours with a break. Often we will have guest lecturers from around the University who are interested in Cognitive Science. These researchers will present aspects of their own work and its relationship to Cognitive Science as a whole. In addition, we will have periodic classes devoted to discussions of foundational issues in Cognitive Science. Class participation is important to this class, as it is to most seminars. Students are expected to do the readings each week and to come prepared to talk about issues related to those readings. While there will be guest speakers each week, it will always be appropriate to ask questions.

Grading Policy Grades will be assigned based on these factors: * 50%: Class attendance and participation, questions inspired by readings, and commentaries. Over the course of the semester, each student may miss 1.5 classes without penalty. Not participating in the class discussion is only marginally better than not attending class. Each class you will bring in two questions related to the assigned readings along with a short paragraph discussing what motivates the questions. * 10%: Homework and quizzes * 40%: Final project - cogsci grant application Policy on incompletes. No incompletes will be given. Policy on independence of work and plagiarism: You are encouraged to discuss the material presented in class with other students. All written work turned in by a student must be the independent work of that student. In the case of the collaborative projects, of course, the work must be the work only of the members of the group. Obviously, you are not to include text that you have not written without clear quotations and attributions of the original source.

Texts None.  Additional Materials Every week there will be additional readings. These readings will be available online as pdf files.

LIN 393S • Socl Meaning & Socl Lang Proc

41270 • Spring 2011
Meets W 200pm-500pm PAR 10
show description

We will consider how social traits are marked (or betrayed) by the language we use, and how corpus and computational methods can be employed to study such marking. Topics will include markers of a wide range of social and psychological factors, such as Politeness, Sentiment, Deception, Status, Gender, Depression, and Group Cohesion. As well as discussing and presenting theoretical literature on these topics, participants will be encouraged to engage in hands-on statistical and computational analysis of corpora or web sources.

CGS 380 • Intro To Cognitive Science

32775 • Fall 2010
Meets F 900am-1200pm SEA 3.250
(also listed as LIN 392, PHL 383C, PSY 394U )
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Course Description

An introduction to cognitive science, the new discipline emerging from the interaction of psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology. The course will range broadly, examining a variety of approaches to the study of how humans and other intelligent systems represent, reason, understand, perceive, use language, learn, and plan purposeful actions. The central assumption is that the human mind is fundamentally a computational organ and that cognitive processes can be explicitly modeled. The course will cover the basic issues and contributions in the field, with particular emphasis on current research at UT. There will be frequent lectures by faculty from the relevant disciplines who are engaged in such research. Major topics in the course will include: * Neuroscience: systems neuroscience, functional brain mapping, relating localized brain damage to spared and damaged abilities, evolutionary biology. * Reasoning, Concepts, and Conceptual Development: categorization, children's theories of mind, nonmonotonic reasoning, qualitative reasoning, problem solving, mental models, schemas. * Computational Approaches: modularity, connectionism, symbol manipulation, knowledge representation, machine learning. * Language: speech perception, sentence parsing, natural language understanding, discourse representation, language acquisition, syntax. * Vision: computational theory, psychology of visual perception, visual imagination, attention, spatial reasoning. * Other Topics: Memory, Philosophy of Mind, Robotics, Implicit Knowledge, Emotion, Learning.

Class will meet once a week for three hours with a break. Often we will have guest lecturers from around the University who are interested in Cognitive Science. These researchers will present aspects of their own work and its relationship to Cognitive Science as a whole. In addition, we will have periodic classes devoted to discussions of foundational issues in Cognitive Science. Class participation is important to this class, as it is to most seminars. Students are expected to do the readings each week and to come prepared to talk about issues related to those readings. While there will be guest speakers each week, it will always be appropriate to ask questions.

Grading Policy
Grades will be assigned based on these factors: * 50%: Class attendance and participation, questions inspired by readings, and commentaries. Over the course of the semester, each student may miss 1.5 classes without penalty. Not participating in the class discussion is only marginally better than not attending class. Each class you will bring in two questions related to the assigned readings along with a short paragraph discussing what motivates the questions. * 10%: Homework and quizzes * 40%: Final project - cogsci grant application Policy on incompletes. No incompletes will be given. Policy on independence of work and plagiarism: You are encouraged to discuss the material presented in class with other students. All written work turned in by a student must be the independent work of that student. In the case of the collaborative projects, of course, the work must be the work only of the members of the group. Obviously, you are not to include text that you have not written without clear quotations and attributions of the original source.

Texts
None.  Additional Materials Every week there will be additional readings. These readings will be available online as pdf files.

LIN 380M • Semantics I

40795 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 210
show description

This is a graduate introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics, introducing students to basic logic, compositional interpretation, and the strategic reasoning involved in deciding what people mean by what they say. By the end, you should be able to follow a substantial portion of current work in the area. Topics covered include different notions of inference and entailment, presupposition, implicature, ambiguity, set theory, propositional logic, first order logic, lambda calculus for compositional interpretation, extraction and binding, quantification and generalized quantifiers , pronouns and ellipsis, basic dynamic semantics, basic intensionality and modality, event semantics, and tense and aspect.
Grading Policy

There will be assignments each week (40%), two reviews of recent journal papers (20%), and a take-home final (30%), plus a class participation component (10%).
Texts

Irene Helm and Angelika Kratzer. Semantics in Generative Grammar. Blackwell 1998.

LIN 392 • Intro To Cognitive Science

40830 • Fall 2010
Meets F 900am-1200pm SEA 3.250
(also listed as CGS 380, PHL 383C, PSY 394U )
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Course Description

An introduction to cognitive science, the new discipline emerging from the interaction of psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology. The course will range broadly, examining a variety of approaches to the study of how humans and other intelligent systems represent, reason, understand, perceive, use language, learn, and plan purposeful actions. The central assumption is that the human mind is fundamentally a computational organ and that cognitive processes can be explicitly modeled. The course will cover the basic issues and contributions in the field, with particular emphasis on current research at UT. There will be frequent lectures by faculty from the relevant disciplines who are engaged in such research. Major topics in the course will include: * Neuroscience: systems neuroscience, functional brain mapping, relating localized brain damage to spared and damaged abilities, evolutionary biology. * Reasoning, Concepts, and Conceptual Development: categorization, children's theories of mind, nonmonotonic reasoning, qualitative reasoning, problem solving, mental models, schemas. * Computational Approaches: modularity, connectionism, symbol manipulation, knowledge representation, machine learning. * Language: speech perception, sentence parsing, natural language understanding, discourse representation, language acquisition, syntax. * Vision: computational theory, psychology of visual perception, visual imagination, attention, spatial reasoning. * Other Topics: Memory, Philosophy of Mind, Robotics, Implicit Knowledge, Emotion, Learning.

Class will meet once a week for three hours with a break. Often we will have guest lecturers from around the University who are interested in Cognitive Science. These researchers will present aspects of their own work and its relationship to Cognitive Science as a whole. In addition, we will have periodic classes devoted to discussions of foundational issues in Cognitive Science. Class participation is important to this class, as it is to most seminars. Students are expected to do the readings each week and to come prepared to talk about issues related to those readings. While there will be guest speakers each week, it will always be appropriate to ask questions.

Grading Policy
Grades will be assigned based on these factors: * 50%: Class attendance and participation, questions inspired by readings, and commentaries. Over the course of the semester, each student may miss 1.5 classes without penalty. Not participating in the class discussion is only marginally better than not attending class. Each class you will bring in two questions related to the assigned readings along with a short paragraph discussing what motivates the questions. * 10%: Homework and quizzes * 40%: Final project - cogsci grant application Policy on incompletes. No incompletes will be given. Policy on independence of work and plagiarism: You are encouraged to discuss the material presented in class with other students. All written work turned in by a student must be the independent work of that student. In the case of the collaborative projects, of course, the work must be the work only of the members of the group. Obviously, you are not to include text that you have not written without clear quotations and attributions of the original source.

Texts
None.  Additional Materials Every week there will be additional readings. These readings will be available online as pdf files.

CGS 360 • Intro To Cognitive Science

33105 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 UTC 3.132
(also listed as LIN 373, PHL 365, PSY 341K )
show description

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 373 • Intro To Cognitive Science

41190 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 UTC 3.132
(also listed as CGS 360, PHL 365, PSY 341K )
show description

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

CGS 360 • Intro To Cognitive Science

32580 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm UTC 3.124
(also listed as LIN 373, PHL 365, PSY 341K )
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

LIN 373 • Intro To Cognitive Science

40580 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm UTC 3.124
(also listed as CGS 360, PHL 365, PSY 341K )
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

Publications

Years

 

2013, to appear, or under submission

  • Coppock, L. and D. Beaver (2013), Principles of the Exclusive Muddle, Journal of Semantics, doi:10.1093/jos/fft007.
  • Tonhauser, J., D. Beaver, C. Roberts, and M. Simons (2013), Towards a taxonomy of projective content, Language 89(1): 66-109. (Awarded Best paper in Language, 2013)
  • David Beaver and Joey Frazee, Semantics (to appear). In Ruslan Mitkov (ed.), The Handbook of Computational Linguistics, OUP.
  • Destruel, E. and D. Beaver (2013). Review: The expression of information structure, Language.
  • Coppock, E. and D. Beaver (2013). Mere-ology. In Falaus, A. (ed.), Alternatives in Semantics. New York: Palgrave, pp. 150-173. 

2012

  • Coppock, E. and D. Beaver (2012). Weak Uniqueness: The only difference between definites and indefinites. in Anca Chereches (ed.), Proceedings of Semantics and Linguistic Theory (SALT) 22, eLanguage, pp. 527-544.
  • Coppock, E. and D. Beaver (2012). Exclusivity, Uniqueness and Definiteness. In Pin, C. (ed.), Empirical Issues in Syntax and Semantics, CSSP, Paris (pp. 59--76).
  • Coppock, E. and D. Beaver (2012). Exclusive Updates! In Aloni, M., F. Roelofsen, G. Weidman Sassoon, K. Schulz, V. Kimmelman and M. Westera (eds.), Logic, Language and Meaning, Springer, Berlin, (pp. 291–300).
  • Coppock, E. and D. Beaver (2012). Sole Sisters. In Ashton, N., A. Chereches, and D. Lutz (eds.), Proceedings of Semantics and Linguistic Theory (SALT) 21, eLanguage (pp. 197–217).
  • Velleman, D., D. Beaver, E. Destruel, D. Bumford, E. Onea and E. Coppock (2012). It-clefts are IT (inquiry terminating) constructions, In Anca Chereches (ed.), Proceedings of Semantics and Linguistic Theory (SALT) 22, eLanguage (pp. 441-460).

2011

  • Edgar Onea and David Beaver (2011), Hungarian focus is not exhausted. In Ed Cormany, Satoshi Ito & David Lutz (eds.), Proceedings of Semantics and Linguistic Theory (SALT) 19, eLanguage, pp. 342–359.
  • Mandy Simons, Judith Tonhauser, David Beaver, and Craige Roberts (2011), What projects and why. In D. Lutz and N. Li (eds.), Proceedings of Semantics and Linguistic Theory XX, CLC Publications, Cornell, pp. 309-327.
  • Bart Geurts and David Beaver (2011), Presupposition. In E. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • David Beaver and Dan Velleman (2011), The communicative significance of primary and secondary accents. Lingua 121:11, (pp.1671-1692, doi:10.1016/j.lingua.2011. 04.004)

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

  • The Optimization of Discourse Anaphora, 2004. Linguistics and Philosophy 27(1), pp. 3-56.
  • Five Only Pieces, 2004. Theoretical Linguistics 30, pp. 45-64.
  • Accomodating Topics, 2004. In H. Kamp and B. H. Partee (eds.), Context-Dependence in the Analysis of Linguistic Meaning, Current Research in the Semantics/Pragmatics Interface, vol. 11, Elsevier (pp.79-90).
  • Input-Output Mismatches in OT (with Hanjung Lee), 2004. In Reinhard Blutner and Henk Zeevat (eds.), Optimality Theory and Pragmatics, Palgrave/Macmillan, pp. 112--153.

2003

2002

  • A Partial Account of Presupposition Projection (with E. Krahmer), 2001. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 10(2), pp. 147-182.
  • Monotonicity and Focus Sensitivity (with B. Clark), 2002. In Brendan Jackson (ed.), Proceedings of SALT XII, CLC Publications, Cornell.
  • The Proper Treatments of Focus Sensitivity (with B. Clark), 2002. In C. Potts and L. Mikkelson (eds.) Proceedings of WCCFL XXI, Cascadilla Press. pp. 15-28.
  • Presupposition in DRT, 2002. In Beaver, D., L. Casillas, B. Clark and S. Kauffmann (eds.), The Construction of Meaning, CSLI Publications. pp. 23-43.
  • Pragmatics, and That's an Order, 2002. In Barker-Plummer, D., D. Beaver, J. van Benthem and P. Scotto di Luzio (eds.), Logic, Language and Visual Information, CSLI Publications. pp. 191-215.
  • The Construction of Meaning (editor, with L. Casillas, B. Clark and S. Kaufmann), 2002. CSLI Publications. (Amazon.com)
  • Words, Proofs and Diagrams (editor, with D. Barker-Plummer, J. van Benthem, and P. Scotto di Luzio), 2002. CSLI Publications. (Amazon.com)

2001

  • Presupposition and Assertion in Dynamic Semantics, 2001. Studies in Logic, Language and Information, CSLI Publications. (NOTE: book available for electronic download.)
  • What does he mean? (with Wolters, M.), 2001. In Moore, J. and K. Stenning (eds.), Proceedings of the Twenty-Third Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey. pp. 1176-1180.

Previous Millenium

  • Pragmatics (to a First Approximation), 1999. In Gerbrandy, J., M. Marx, M. de Rijke and Y. Venema (eds.), JFAK --- Essays Dedicated to Johan van Benthem on the Occasion of his 50th Birthday, Vossiuspers, Amsterdam University Press. (13 pages).
  • The Logic of Anaphora Resolution, 1999. In Dekker, P. (ed.), Proceedings of the Twelfth Amsterdam Colloquium, Institute of Logic, Language and Computation Publications, Amsterdam. pp. 55-60.
  • Topic and Focus Sensitivity (with Aloni, M. and B. Clark), 1999. In Dekker, P. (ed.), Proceedings of the Twelfth Amsterdam Colloquium, Institute of Logic, Language and Computation Publications, Amsterdam. pp.61-66.
  • Presupposition Accommodation: A Plea for Common Sense, 1999. In Moss, L. J. Ginzburg and M. de Rijke (eds.), Logic, Language and Computation, vol.2, CSLI Publications. pp. 21-44. (revised version of Beaver, D. (1994) "An Infinite Number of Monkeys").
  • Presupposition, 1997. In van Bethem, J. and A. ter Meulen (eds.), The Handbook of Logic and Language, Elsevier. pp. 939-1008.
  • Local Satisfaction Preferred, 1996. In Dekker, P. and M. Stokhof (eds.), Proceedings of the Tenth Amsterdam Colloquium, Institute of Logic, Language and Computation Publications, Amsterdam. pp. 57-72.
  • When Variables Don't Vary Enough, 1994. In Harvey, M. and L. Santelmann (eds.), Proceedings of Semantics and Linguistic Theory IV, Cornell. pp.35-60.
  • An Infinite Number of Monkeys, 1994. Acta Linguistica Hungarica 42(3), pp.253-270.
  • The Kinematics of Presupposition, 1992. In Dekker, P. and M. Stokhof (eds.), Proceedings of the Eighth Amsterdam Colloquium, Institute of Logic, Language and Computation Publications, Amsterdam. pp. 17-36.

Selected Talks

Research Interests

I research and teach on the semantics and pragmatics of natural languages.

The methodologies I use include computational studies of large corpora of text, experimental work, and theoretical modeling using tools from logic and statistics.

The main empirical topics I have worked on are:

  • Presupposition (how what we take for granted is reflected in what we say)
  • Anaphora (how words like pronouns pick up their meaning from prior context)
  • Topic/Focus (the way that we use melody and other features to indicate the question being addressed and what the answer is).

I also have interests in temporal and event semantics, in the automatic extraction of psychological and social features in text and dialogue, and in broader philosophical, psychological and computational themes from cognitive science.

I am the author of "Presupposition and Assertion in Dynamic Semantics" (CSLI Publications, 2001), and joint author (with Brady Clark) of "Sense and Sensitivity: how focus determines meaning" (Blackwell/Wiley, 2008), and have also authored many journal articles and book chapters (mostly available for electronic download from my publications page).

Other Courses

University of Texas at Austin classes (2006 to present)

Spring 2011

Fall 2010

  • LIN 380M: Semantics I
  • UGS 303: Mind and Reason
  • CGS 380/LIN 392/PHL 383C/PSY 394U/CS 395T: Introduction to Cognitive Science (GRAD)

Spring 2010

  • CGS 360/LIN 373/PHL 365/PSY 341K: Introduction to Cognitive Science

Fall 2009

Spring 2009

Spring 2008

  • CGS 360/LIN 373/PHL 365/PSY 341K: Introduction to Cognitive Science
  • LIN 381S: Semantics II

Fall 2007

Spring 2007

  • LIN 393S: Information and Intonation
  • LIN 350: Language, Meaning and Context

Fall 2006

  • LIN 381M: Semantics I

 

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Stanford classes (1997 to 2005)

Fall 2005

Winter 2005

Fall 2004

  • Introduction to Linguistics

Spring 2004

Winter 2004

Spring 2003

Winter 2003

  • LING233: Focus and Focus Sensitivity

Spring 2001

Winter 2001

Spring 2000

September 2000

  • Symbolic Systems Honors College

Winter 2000

  • LING 130: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics

Spring 1999

September 1999

  • Symbolic Systems Honors College

Winter 1999

Spring 1998

May-July 1998

  • Electronic Course in Dynamic Semantics

September 1998

  • Symbolic Systems Honors College

Fall 1998

Winter 1998

  • LING 130: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics

Fall 1997

 

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Language Log Posts

 

My recent posts are here.

 

Search for pre-August 2008 LL contributions and mentions here.

 


Links to posts 11/2003 - 2/2007:

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

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