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Richard P. Meier, Chair CLA 4.304, Mailcode B5100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1701

Nora C. England

Professor Ph.D., University of Florida

Dallas TACA Centennial Professor in the Humanities
Nora C. England

Contact

  • Phone: 512.471.9014
  • Office: CLA 4.732
  • Office Hours: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-11:00
  • Campus Mail Code: B5100

Biography

Nora England’s research is on the grammar of Mayan languages and contemporary Mayan language politics. She founded and advised a Guatemalan Maya NGO that was dedicated to research on Mayan languages for nineteen years. She joined the linguistics faculty of the University of Texas in 2001, where she is also the founding director of the Center for Indigenous Languages of Latin America. Her publications include six books and numerous articles on Mayan linguistics and language politics; she has also supervised the preparation of over twenty-five books in linguistics by speakers of Mayan languages.  She was a MacArthur Fellow from 1993-1998.

 

Interests

linguistic description, grammar writing, language and identity, language politics, language ideologies, Mayan linguistics, American languages

LIN 350 • Indigenous Langs Of Amers

41080 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.104
(also listed as ANT 320L, LAS 322 )
show description

Examines various aspects of languages in the Americas, including their linguistic structures, the cultural domains in which they exist, and their histories of language contact and change.

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

41245 • Fall 2014
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CLA 4.716
show description

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

41415 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.126
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

LIN 384 • Structure Of Mayan Languages

41570 • Spring 2014
Meets MF 130pm-300pm CLA 4.716
show description

This is an advanced seminar in the Structure of Mayan Languages. Specific topics will be selected according to individual interests and preparation. The course assumes a basic knowledge of the grammatical structure of Mayan languages. In general, each week will be devoted to a particular topic. The course requires reading, a class presentation, and a final paper.

LIN 350 • How To Describe A Language

41305 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.108
show description

Course Description:This course is a practical introduction to language documentation and preservation. Language diversity will be discussed, including its benefits, the status of the world’s language, their endangerment, and the possibilities for their maintenance and/or preservation. Practical methods for describing, documenting, and preserving languages will be introduced, with appropriate exercises for learning how to use them. The focus of the exercises will be on the phonological and morphological analysis of restricted data sets. The role of linguists in conjunction with communities of speakers who wish to document or revitalize their languages will also be discussed.

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

41445 • Fall 2013
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CLA 4.716
show description

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

40910 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.126
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

40910 • Fall 2012
Meets TH 330pm-630pm CAL 419
show description

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

40735 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CAL 100
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

LIN 392 • Tools For Ling Description

40795 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 21
show description

Presented in this course are the basic tools for analyzing and describing a language you are documenting through linguistic field work, including phonetic transcription, the methods for the discovery and presentation of surface phonology, morphophonology, inflectional morphology, derivational morphology, grammatical categories, and syntax. There will be an emphasis on practice and drilling via transcription exercises and problem sets. In addition – where appropriate – we will study relevant aspects of linguistic typology in order to gain an advance idea of the kinds of structures and categories that can be encountered in field work. This course is intended as a companion course to LIN 385, Field Methods in Linguistic Investigation, which gives hands-on field elicitation training and to LIN 392, Linguistic Typology. It also serves as a companion to the “core” courses in Phonetics (381M), Phonology (380K, 381K), and Syntax (380L, 381L), which focus on largely complementary theoretical issues. While some students will have already taken field methods, or some or all of the core courses, none are a prerequisite. It is possible to take this course with little or no prior background in linguistics. Requirements Problem sets and exercises: 100%. Problem sets (except for Problem Set 1) are due on Thursday and should be turned in in class. It’s not my job to print your work.

Readings Required: Haspelmath, Martin & Sims, Andrea. 2010. Understanding Morphology. London: Arnold (New York: Oxford University Press). Available at UT Coop.

Payne, Thomas. 1998. Describing Morphosyntax: A Guide for Field Linguists. Cambridge University Press. Available at UT Coop.

 

Ladefoged sounds site: http://phonetics.ucla.edu/course/chapter1/chapter1.html or alternately, the CD sold with: Ladefoged, Peter. 2001. Vowels and Consonants: An Introduction to the Sounds of Languages. Blackwell.

 

Students with disabilities The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY.

LIN 397 • Forum For Doctoral Candidates

40835 • Fall 2011
Meets F 1200pm-300pm CBA 4.346
show description

Doctoral Forum is designed to help PhD students write the qualifying paper in their fifth semester. The main objective is to have a draft of the QP by the end of the semester. In addition, the process from the QP forward in the graduate program will be reviewed and professional skills will be practiced in conjunction with writing the QP. These include abstract writing, preparing a curriculum vitae, making handouts and slides, and giving presentations.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

41060 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CAL 100
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. In what ways do languages differ? In what ways are languages the same? How do languages change over time? Why do languages change? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communicating? Do dolphins speak? How do children learn language, and how do adults learn language? Does language control our view of reality? How does language interact with social class? What kind of language should be taught in schools? What language problems do other countries have? What are the different language families of the world? The course will deal with sociolinguistics (language in society), historical linguistics (language change and language relationships), and formal linguistics. Basic material covered under formal linguistics includes phonetics (the properties of speech sounds), phonology (the systematic sound patterns of language), morphology (the grammatical structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), and semantics/pragmatics (the meaning and use of words and sentences).
Texts

Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

LIN 392 • Reading And Writing Grammars

41240 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 1230pm-200pm CBA 4.346
show description

The objective of this course is to analyze what makes a good grammar.  A set of five grammars will be chosen by each student to read and analyze, from the perspectives of general readability, completeness, usefulness for looking up specific information, usefulness for comparative/typological information, and usefulness for speakers. Evaluative problems involving the selected grammars will be assigned. Additional topics will cover sources for linguistic questionnaires and elicitation sessions, how to collect and analyze texts, and what are the uses of elicited material and text material in grammar writing.  Two papers are required: 1) a short paper on one of the evaluative topiccs, and 2) a final paper on one of two different topics: a) for those students who already have data that they are in the process of analyzing, the final paper will consist of a detailed outline of a grammar plus several representative sections; or b) for those students who do not have data that they are in the process of analyzing, the final paper will consist of a thorough critique of a grammar (not one of the ones assigned for class), with a reworked outline and several representative sections. 

LIN 350 • Indigenous Langs Of Americas

40704 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GSB 2.122
(also listed as ANT 320L, LAS 322 )
show description


Course Description

This course is an introduction to the indigenous languages that are and have been spoken in the Americas. It begins with an overview of the languages and their status, and then considers some of the diverse linguistic structures that American indigenous languages have. The cultural and social domains in which American indigenous languages exist are examined, as is the history of language contact and language change in different areas.
Texts

Shirley Silver and Wick R. Miller. 1997. American Indian Languages. The University of Arizona Press. Additional readings will be assigned.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

41040 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 CAL 100
show description

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 384 • Adv Structure Of Mayan Langs

41229 • Spring 2010
Meets W 100pm-400pm CBA 4.340
show description

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 350 • How To Describe A Language

41465 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CBA 4.328
show description


Course Description:
This course is a practical introduction to language documentation and preservation. Language diversity will be discussed, including its benefits, the status of the world’s language, their endangerment, and the possibilities for their maintenance and/or preservation. Practical methods for describing, documenting, and preserving languages will be introduced, with appropriate exercises for learning how to use them. The focus of the exercises will be on the phonological and morphological analysis of restricted data sets. The role of linguists in conjunction with communities of speakers who wish to document or revitalize their languages will also be discussed.


Course Requirements:

Two partial exams, two short papers and frequent problem sets.


Grading Policy:
Exams: 30% (15 points each)
Short papers: 20% (10 points each)
Problem sets: 40% (each problem 5 points)
Class participation: 10% (sounds quiz 4 points, attendance 6 points)
(Attendance is required, unless you have a valid medical or other reason for not being able to attend. You must inform me about absences before class for an absence to be excused. After two unexcused absences, 2 points will be subtracted for each additional absence, up to a total of 6 points.)


Reading (on Blackboard):

Bird, Charles and Timothy Shopen. 1979. Maninka. Chapter 2 in Languages and Their Speakers, edited by Timothy Shopen. Cambridge, MA: Winthrop, pp. 59-111.
Crystal, David. 2000. Chapter 2: Why Should We Care? in Language Death. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, pp. 27-67.
England, Nora. 2003. Mayan Language Revival and Revitalization Politics: Linguists and Linguistic Ideologies. American Anthropologist 105(4): 733-743.
Hale, Ken. 1992. Language Endangerment and the human value of linguistic diversity. Language, Vol.
68, No. 1. pp. 35-42.
Haviland, John B. 1979. How to Talk to your Brother-in-law in Guugu Yimidhirr. Chapter 4 in Languages and Their Speakers, edited by Timothy Shopen. Cambridge, MA: Winthrop, pp. 161-
239.
Hill, Kenneth C. 2002. On Publishing the Hopi Dictionary. In Making Dictionaries, edited by William Frawley, Kenneth C. Hill, and Pamela Munro. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, pp. 299-311.
Hinton, Leanne. 2001. Language Revitalization: An Overview. Chapter 1 in The Green Book of Language Revitalization in Practice, edited by Leanne Hinton and Ken Hale. New York:
Academic Press, pp. 3-18.
Nettle, Daniel and Suzanne Romaine. 2000. Chapter 2: A World of Diversity, in Vanishing Voices: the Extinction of the World’s Languages. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 26-49.
Reyhner, Jon. 1999. Some Basics of Indigenous Language Revitalization. Introduction to Revitalizing Indigenous Languages, edited by Jon Reyhner, Gina Cantoni, Robert N. St. Clair, and Evangeline Parsons Yazzie. Flagstaff, AZ: Northern Arizona University, pp. v-xx.

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 392 • Tools For Ling Description

41600 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 21
show description


Course Description

Presented in this course are the basic tools for analyzing and describing a language you are documenting
through linguistic field work, including phonetic transcription, the methods for the discovery and presentation of surface phonology, morphophonology, inflectional morphology, derivational morphology, grammatical categories, and syntax. There will be an emphasis on practice and drilling via transcription exercises and problem sets. In addition – where appropriate – we will study relevant aspects of linguistic typology in order to gain an advance idea of the kinds of structures and categories that can be encountered in field work.

This course is intended as a companion course to LIN 385, Field Methods in Linguistic Investigation, which gives hands-on field elicitation training and to LIN 392, Linguistic Typology. It also serves as a companion to the “core” courses in Phonetics (381M), Phonology (380K, 381K), and Syntax (380L, 381L), which focus on largely complementary theoretical issues. While some students will have already taken field methods, or some or all of the core courses, none are a prerequisite. It is possible to take this course with little or no prior background in linguistics.

Requirements

Problem sets and exercises: 100%. Problem sets (except for Problem Set 1) are due on Thursday and should be turned in in class. It’s not my job to print your work.

Readings

Required:
Haspelmath, Martin. 2002. Understanding Morphology. London: Arnold (New York: Oxford
University Press). Will be made available.
Payne, Thomas. 1998. Describing Morphosyntax: A Guide for Field Linguists. Cambridge University
Press. Available at UT Coop.
Ladefoged sounds site:
http://phonetics.ucla.edu/course/chapter1/chapter1.html

or alternately, the CD sold with:

Ladefoged, Peter. 2001. Vowels and Consonants: An Introduction to the Sounds of Languages. Blackwell.

Students with disabilities

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for
qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at
471-6259, 471-6441 TTY.

For detailed Course Schedule, donwload attachment.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

40430 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 UTC 4.110
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

Publications

England, Nora C. in press. "Cláusulas con flexión reducida en Mam." In Estudios Sintácticos en Lenguas de Mesoamérica, eds. Enrique Palancar and Roberto Zavala, Mexico.

England, Nora C. and Roberto Zavala Maldonado. 2013. "Mayan Languages." Oxford Bibliographies Online: Linguistics, edited by Mark Aronoff.  Launch date: 2013-04-22.  http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199772810/obo-9780199772810-0147.xml?rskey=oRD7oo&result=35&q=

England, Nora C. 2013. "Marking Aspect and Mood and Inferring Time in Mam (Mayan)." Proceedings of the Thirty-Third Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society, February 9-11, 2007: 119-140.

England, Nora C. 2012. "The Study of Indigenous Languages in Latin America." LASA Forum XLIII, Issue 1: 11-14. http://lasa.international.pitt.edu/forum/files/vol43-issue1/OnTheProfession3.pdf

England, Nora. 2011. "Plurality agreement in some Eastern Mayan languages." International Journal of American Linguistics 77, 3:397-412.

England, Nora C. and Roberto Zavala Maldonado. 2011. "Mesoamerican Languages." Oxford Bibliographies Online: Linguistics, edited by Mark Aronoff. Launch date 2011-10-28. http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199772810/obo-9780199772810-0080.xml?rskey=oRD7oo&result=36&q=

Can Pixabaj, Telma and Nora C. England. 2011. "Nominal topic and focus in K’ichee’." In  Representing Language: Essays in Honor of Judith Aissen, eds. Rodrigo Gutiérrez-Bravo, Line Mikkelsen and Eric Potsdam, 15-30. California Digital Library eScholarship Repository. Linguistic Research Center, University of California, Santa Cruz. (Also available from the on-demand publisher BookSurge.) http://escholarship.org/uc/item/0vf4s9tk, or http://escholarship.org/uc/lrc_aissen

England, Nora C. 2009.  “To tell a tale: the structure of narrated stories in Mam, a Mayan language.” International Journal of American Linguistics 75, 2: 207-33.

England, Nora C. 2007. “The Influence of Mayan-speaking linguists on the state of Mayan linguistics.” Linguistische Berichte Sonderheft 14: 93-111. Special edition, Peter K. Austin and Andrew Simpson (eds.) Endangered Languages. Hamburg: Helmut Buske Verlag.

England, Nora C. 2006. “El papel de palabras afectivas en la narración en Mam (Maya).” Memorias del VIII Encuentro Internacional de Lingüística en el noroeste, III: 157-171. Hermosillo, Sonora: Editorial UniSon.

England, Nora C. 2004. “Adjectives in Mam.” In R.M.W. Dixon and Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald (eds.) Adjective classes: a cross-linguistic typology, pp. 125-146. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Woodbury, Anthony C. and Nora C. England. 2004. “Training speakers of indigenous languages of Latin America at a US university.”  In Peter K. Austin (ed.) Language Documentation and Description, Volume 2, pp. 122-139.  London: Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project, Department of Linguistics, SOAS, University of London.

England, Nora C. 2003. “Maya linguists, linguistics, and the politics of identity.”  Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Symposium about Language and Society – Austin, April 12-14, 2002.  Texas Linguistics Society 45: 33-45.

England, Nora C. and Laura Martin. 2003. “Issues in the comparative argument structure analysis in Mayan narratives.”  In John W. Du Bois, Lorraine E. Kumpf, and William J. Ashby (eds.) Preferred Argument Structure: Grammars as architecture for function, pp. 131-157.  Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

England, Nora C. 2003. “Mayan language revival and revitalization politics: Linguists and linguistic ideologies.”  American Anthropologist, 105, 4: 733-743.

England, Nora C. 2001. Introducción a la gramática de los idiomas mayas.  Guatemala:  Cholsamaj.

England, Nora C. 1998. “Mayan Efforts Toward Language Preservation.”  In Lenore Grenoble and Lindsay Whaley (eds.) Endangered Languages, pp. 99-116.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

England, Nora C. 1997. “Topicalización, enfoque y énfasis.”  Cultura de Guatemala, año XVIII, vol. II: 273-288.  Guatemala: Universidad Rafael Landívar.

England, Nora C. 1996. “The Role of Language Standardization in Revitalization.”  In R. McKenna Brown and Edward K. Fischer(eds.) Mayan Cultural Activism in Guatemala, pp. 178-194.  Austin:  University of Texas Press.

England, Nora C. 1995. “Linguistics and Indigenous American Languages: Mayan Examples.”  Journal of Latin American Anthropology 1: 122-149

England, Nora C., Pablo García Ixmatá, Pedro García Matzar, María Juliana Sis Iboy, José O. Rodríguez Guaján, Candelaria López Ixcoy, José Gonzalo Benito Pérez. 1993. Maya’ chii’: Idiomas mayas de Guatemala.  Guatemala: Cholsamaj, 1st reprinting 1997, 2nd reprinting (revised) 2003.

England, Nora C. 1992. Autonomía de los idiomas mayas: Historia e identidad.  Guatemala: Cholsamaj.  2nd ed. 1994.

England, Nora C. 1992. “Endangered Languages:  Doing Mayan Linguistics in Guatemala.”  Language 68: 29-35.

England, Nora C. 1991. “Changes in Basic Word Order in Mayan Languages.” International Journal of American Linguistics 57: 446-486.

England, Nora C. and Stephen R. Elliott, eds., 1990. Lecturas sobre la lingüística maya. Guatemala: Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Mesoamérica.

England, Nora C. 1990. “El mam: Semejanzas y diferencias regionales.” In Nora C. England and Stephen R. Elliott (eds.) Lecturas sobre la lingüística maya, pp. 221-252.  Guatemala: Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Mesoamérica.

England, Nora C. 1989. “Comparing Mam (Mayan) Clause Structures:  Subordinate vs. Main Clauses.” International Journal of American Linguistics 55, 3: 283-308.

England, Nora C. 1988. Introducción a la lingüística: Idiomas mayas.  Guatemala: Proyecto Lingüístico Francisco Marroquín. 1st reprinting 1992.  2nd ed. 1996, Guatemala: Cholsamaj and Proyecto Lingüístico Francisco Marroquín (substantial changes). 1st reprinting 1999, 2nd reprinting 2002.

England, Nora C. 1988.  “Mam Voice.” In M. Shibatani (ed.) Typological Studies in Language, 16: Passive and Voice, pp. 525-545. Amsterdam:  John Benjamins

England, Nora C. 1987. “Variation in Mayan Narrative.” Anthropological Linguistics, Winter 1987: 522-532

England, Nora C. 1983. A Grammar of Mam, a Mayan Language. Austin: University of Texas Press.

England, Nora C. 1983. “Ergativity in Mamean (Mayan) Languages.” International Journal of American Linguistics 49: 1-19.

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