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Anthony C. Woodbury, Chair CLA 4.304, Mailcode B5100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1701

Rajka Smiljanic

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Rajka Smiljanic

Contact

Biography

 Rajka Smiljanic is the Principal Investigator of the UTsoundLab and the director of the Phonetics Lab. She is an Associate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin. Her work is concentrated in the areas of experimental phonetics, cross-language and second language speech production and perception, clear speech, intelligibility, and prosody. She received a bachelor’s degree in English and Russian Languages and Literatures at the University of Zagreb, Croatia, and her MA and PhD from the Linguistics Department at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. After receiving her doctorate, she worked as a Research Associate and Lecturer in the Linguistics Department at Northwestern University. She also taught in the Communications Disorders and Sciences Department at Rush University.

 

 

LIN 350 • Speech Intelligibility

41085 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.108
show description

This is an upper division undergraduate course in which we will cover some of the main empirical findings on talker-, listener-, and signal-related factors that shape speech intelligibility, i.e., the degree to which spoken language can be comprehended. We will explore how signal-related (physical), peripheral (auditory-perceptual) and system-related (mental) factors condition variation in both the production and perception of intelligible speech. Variation due to individual differences, hearing impairment, noise, native language background, foreign accent, and ageing, among others, will be discussed. We will also examine how variation in intelligibility conditions different levels of spoken language processing and different tasks that the listener is performing during spoken language comprehension. To help us gain insights into the sources of intelligibility variation, we will consider research paradigms and findings from experimental phonetics, speech science and psycholinguistics. This course is intended to encourage you to think critically, give constructive feedback to peers, and improve your scientific presentation and writing skills.

A major component of the course will involve students working in small groups on analyzing speech of various levels of intelligibility and designing and carrying out a perception experiment. The students will be presenting the findings to the class and writing lab reports.

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work.

LIN 393P • Lang Experience & Speech Proce

41225 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 1.108
show description

This research seminar will examine influences of language and linguistic experience on speech processing. The course will provide a comprehensive review of native and nonnative speech processing research over the past four decades. It will provide theoretical and empirical perspectives illustrating how processes of spoken language comprehension are shaped by native language experience. We will also learn about experimental techniques that provided significant advances in the field of spoken language processing. A major component of the course will involve designing and conducting a perception experiment. This course is intended to encourage you to expand your research focus, learn about new experimental paradigms, think critically, give constructive feedback to peers, and improve your scientific presentation and writing skills.

LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

41440 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.106
show description

Linguistics 344 is an introduction to the sound structure of language. We will learn to describe speech sounds in the three domains of speech: the articulatory domain (how speech sounds are produced in the human vocal tract), the acoustic domain (their form in the acoustic medium), and the perceptual domain (how listeners process the incoming speech signal). We will explore how the sounds differ across various dialects of English and across the world's languages. We will learn how children acquire the sounds system of their language and how language experience shapes that acquisition. Finally, we will address topics, such as second language acquisition and current speech technology as it applies to computerized speech synthesis and speech recognition.

LIN 381M • Phonetics

41555 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 2.118
show description

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

41300 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CPE 2.212
show description

Linguistics 344 is an introduction to the sound structure of language. We will learn to describe speech sounds in the three domains of speech: the articulatory domain (how speech sounds are produced in the human vocal tract), the acoustic domain (their form in the acoustic medium), and the perceptual domain (how listeners process the incoming speech signal). We will explore how the sounds differ across various dialects of English and across the world's languages. We will learn how children acquire the sounds system of their language and how language experience shapes that acquisition. Finally, we will address topics, such as second language acquisition and current speech technology as it applies to computerized speech synthesis and speech recognition.

LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

40930 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.106
show description

Linguistics 344 is an introduction to the sound structure of language. We will learn to describe speech sounds in the three domains of speech: the articulatory domain (how speech sounds are produced in the human vocal tract), the acoustic domain (their form in the acoustic medium), and the perceptual domain (how listeners process the incoming speech signal). We will explore how the sounds differ across various dialects of English and across the world's languages. We will learn how children acquire the sounds system of their language and how language experience shapes that acquisition. Finally, we will address topics, such as second language acquisition and current speech technology as it applies to computerized speech synthesis and speech recognition. 

LIN 381M • Phonetics

41020 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 21
show description

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN 350 • Speech Intelligibility

40770 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.122
show description

Issues in Speech Intelligibility. This is an upper division undergraduate course in which we will cover some of the main empirical findings on talker-, listener-, and signal-related factors that shape speech intelligibility, i.e., the degree to which spoken language can be comprehended. We will explore how signal-related (physical), peripheral (auditory-perceptual) and system-related (mental) factors condition variation in both the production and perception of intelligible speech. Variation due to individual differences, hearing impairment, noise, native language background, foreign accent, and ageing, among others, will be discussed. We will also examine how variation in intelligibility conditions different levels of spoken language processing and different tasks that the listener is performing during spoken language comprehension. To help us gain insights into the sources of intelligibility variation, we will consider research paradigms and findings from experimental phonetics, speech science and psycholinguistics. A major component of the course will involve students working in small groups on analyzing speech of various levels of intelligibility and designing and carrying out a perception experiment. The students will be presenting the findings to the class and writing lab reports.

LIN 393P • Speech Perception

40880 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 310
show description

Issues in Phonetics: Topics in Perception

This is a research seminar which provides an overview of the theories and empirical findings on human speech perception and recognition. Topics include an overview of phonetics, phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, intermodal perception of speech, and the interaction between speech perception and production. Additional topics include talker, listener, rate, intelligibility, and dialect variability. A major component of the course will involve students working in small groups to design and conduct a perception experiment.

PREREQUISITES: Introduction to Phonetics course, or permission of the instructor.

LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

40775 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 201
show description

Linguistics 344 is an introduction to the sound structure of language. We will learn to describe speech sounds in the three domains of speech: the articulatory domain (how speech sounds are produced in the human vocal tract), the acoustic domain (their form in the acoustic medium), and the perceptual domain (how listeners process the incoming speech signal). We will explore how the sounds differ across various dialects of English and across the world's languages. We will learn how children acquire the sounds system of their language and how language experience shapes that acquisition. Finally, we will address topics, such as second language acquisition and current speech technology as it applies to computerized speech synthesis and speech recognition.

LIN 381M • Phonetics

40865 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.118
show description

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis. 

LIN 393P • Issues: Speech Intelligibility

40815 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 2.128
show description

This is a research seminar in which we will cover some of the main empirical findings on talker-, listener-, and signal-related factors that shape speech intelligibility, i.e., the degree to which spoken language can be comprehended. We will explore how signal-related (physical), peripheral (auditory-perceptual) and system-related (mental) factors condition variation in both the production and perception of intelligible speech. Variation due to individual differences, hearing impairment, noise, native language background, foreign accent, and ageing, among others, will be discussed. We will also examine how variation in intelligibility conditions different levels of spoken language processing and different tasks that the listener is performing during spoken language comprehension. To help us gain insights into the sources of intelligibility variation, we will consider research paradigms and findings from experimental phonetics, speech science and psycholinguistics. We will discuss the implications of these findings for theories and models of first and second language speech production and perception.A major component of the course will involve students working either individually or in small groups to design and compile a speech database. This database will be used for acoustic analyses and for perception experiments addressing variation in speech intelligibility.PREREQUISITES: Intro to Phonetics course, or permission of the instructor.

LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

41100 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 301
show description

Linguistics 344 is an introduction to the sound structure of language. We will learn to describe speech sounds in the three domains of speech: the articulatory domain (how speech sounds are produced in the human vocal tract), the acoustic domain (their form in the acoustic medium), and the perceptual domain (how listeners process the incoming speech signal). We will explore how the sounds differ across various dialects of English and across the world's languages. We will learn how children acquire the sounds system of their language and how language experience shapes that acquisition. Finally, we will address topics, such as second language acquisition and current speech technology as it applies to computerized speech synthesis and speech recognition.

 

LIN 381M • Phonetics

41195 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.202
show description

Linguistics 381M covers topics in articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and in speech perception. The overall goal of this course is to describe the essential factors that control and constrain the production and perception of speech. The students will learn about the speech production mechanism and the acoustic theory of speech production. In discussing speech production, we will discuss the anatomical, physiological, aerodynamic, and other factors that underlie the articulatory movements yielding the acoustic speech waveform. The acoustic correlates of speech sounds and acoustic-phonetic features of connected speech and prosody are covered. We will also address the perception of speech signals including such topics as phonetic categorization, speech perception and linguistic experience, and the role of speech perception in phonology. In all areas a historical perspective will be provided, discussing some of the major research studies that formed the basis for today’s theoretical positions on speech motor control and the non-invariance issue in speech production/perception. Lab sessions will introduce students to techniques for sound recording, digitization, and waveform and spectrographic analysis using the Praat program for digital speech analysis.

LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

41120 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm PAR 301
show description

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 381M • Phonetics

41222 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.206
show description

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 344K • Phonet: Prod/Percpt Spe Sounds

41455 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm PAR 1
show description

Linguistics 344 is an introduction to the sound structure of language. We will learn to describe speech sounds in the three domains of speech: the articulatory domain (how speech sounds are produced in the human vocal tract), the acoustic domain (their form in the acoustic medium), and the perceptual domain (how listeners process the incoming speech signal). We will explore how the sounds differ across various dialects of English and across the world's languages. We will learn how children acquire the sounds system of their language and how language experience shapes that acquisition. Finally, we will address topics, such as second language acquisition and current speech technology as it applies to computerized speech synthesis and speech recognition.

Publications

Book:

Smiljanić, Rajka (2004). Lexical, Pragmatic, and Positional Effects on Prosody in Two Dialects of Croatian and Serbian: An Acoustic Study. Outstanding Dissertations in Linguistics. New York: Routledge. 194 pages.

Peer-reviewed journal articles:

Clopper, Cynthia and Rajka Smiljanic (Under revision). Regional variation in temporal organization in American English. Journal of Phonetics.

Yi, Han-Gyol, Rajka Smiljanic and Bharath Chandrasekaran (2014). The neural processing of foreign-accented speech is modulated by implicit listener bias: An fMRI study. Invited contribution to Frontiers in Psychology (Human Neuroscience), Research Topic “The cognitive and neural organisation of speech processing.” Edited by Dr(s) Patti Adank, Carolyn McGettigan, Sonja A E  Kotz.

Van Engen, Kristin, Jasmine Phelps, Rajka Smiljanic and Bharath Chandrasekaran (2014). Sentence intelligibility in N-talker babble: effects of context, modality, and speaking style. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. doi:10.1044/JSLHR-H-13-0076  

Gilbert, Rachael, Bharath Chandrasekaran and Rajka Smiljanic (2014). Recognition memory in noise for speech of varying intelligibility. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 135 (1). 389-399.

Yi, Han-Gyol, Jasmine Phelps, Rajka Smiljanic and Bharath Chandrasekaran (2013). Reduced efficiency of audiovisual integration for nonnative speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 134(5). EL387-393.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Douglas Sladen (2013). Acoustic and semantic enhancements for children with cochlear implants. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 56. 1085-1096.

Rimikis, Stacey, Rajka Smiljanic, and Lauren Calandruccio (2013). Nonnative English Speaker Performance on the Basic English Lexicon (BEL) Sentences. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 56, 792-804.

Sjerps, Matthias, and Rajka Smiljanic (2013). Compensation for vocal tract characteristics across native and non-native languages. Journal of Phonetics, 41. 145-155.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2013). Can older adults enhance the intelligibility of their speech? Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 133(2). Express Letters 129-135.

Van Engen Kristin, Bharath Chandrasekaran and Rajka Smiljanic (2012). Effects of Speech Clarity on Recognition Memory for Spoken Sentences. PLoS ONE 7(9): e43753. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0043753

Calandruccio, Lauren and Rajka Smiljanic (2012). New Sentence Recognition Materials Developed Using a Basic Non-Native English Lexicon. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 55: 1342-1355.

Related press: Calandruccio, L. (2010). Sentence Recognition for Non-Native Speakers Researchers Reduce Linguistic Bias in Audiology Assessment. The ASHA Leader.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2011). Bidirectional clear speech perception benefit for native and high-proficiency non-native talker- listeners: Intelligibility and accentedness. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 130 (6). 4020-4031.

Clopper, Cynthia and Rajka Smiljanic (2011).Effects of gender and regional dialect on prosodic patterns in American English.Journal of Phonetics 39. 237-245.

Bradlow, Ann, Cynthia Clopper, Rajka Smiljanic and Mary-Ann Walter (2010). A perceptual phonetic similarity space for languages: Evidence from five native language listener groups. Speech Communication 52, 930-942.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2009). Speaking and Hearing Clearly: Talker and Listener Factors in Speaking Style Changes. Language and Linguistics Compass, 3.1. 236-264. Oxford: Blackwell. (Invited contribution).

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2010). Teaching and learning guide for: Speaking and hearing clearly: Talker and listener factors in speaking style changes. Language and Linguistics Compass, 4.3. 182-186. Oxford: Blackwell.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2008). Temporal organization of English clear and conversational speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 124.5. 3171-3182.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2008). Stability of temporal contrasts across speaking styles in English and Croatian. Journal of Phonetics, 36.1. 91-113.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2005). Production and perception of clear speech in Croatian and English. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 118 (3), 1677-1688.

Peer-reviewed book chapters and conference proceedings:

Kelly, Niamh E. and R. Smiljanic (2014). The Effect of Focus on Norwegian Tonal Accent. Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Tonal Aspects of Languages. Nijmegen, May 13-16 2014.

Kelly, Niamh E. and R. Smiljanic (2014). Monosyllabic Lexical Pitch Contrasts in Norwegian. Proceedings of Speech Prosody, Dublin, May 21-25 2014.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Bharath Chandrasekaran (2013). Processing speech of varying intelligibility. Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics 19, 060102, 1-4.

Smiljanic, Rajka, Stan Sheft, Bharath Chandrasekaran and Valeriy Shafiro (2013). Effect of speech clarity on perception of interrupted meaningful and anomalous sentences. Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics 19, 060109, 1-5.

Rao, Gayatri, Rajka Smiljanic and Randy Diehl (2013). Individual variability in phonetic convergence of vowels and rhythm. Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics 19, 060084, 1-3.

Boyce, Suzanne, Jean Krause, Sarah Hamilton, Rajka Smiljanic, Ann R. Bradlow, Ahmed Rivera-Campos, and Joel MacAuslan (2013). Using Landmark Detection to measure effective Clear Speech. Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics 19, 060129, 1-5.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2012). Second-Language Speech Learning. In Cohn, A. C., Fougeron, C., Huffman, M. eds., The Oxford Handbook of Laboratory Phonology, 417-425. Oxford University Press. (Invited contribution).

Rao, Gayatri and Rajka Smiljanic (2011). Effects of Language, Speaking Style and Age on Prosodic Rhythm. Proceedings of the XVIIth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, 1662-1665. Hong Kong, China. http://www.icphs2011.hk/ICPHS_CongressProceedings.htm.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2007). Clear speech intelligibility: Listener and talker effects. Proceedings of the XVIth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, 661-664. Saarbrucken, Germany. http://www.icphs2007.de/

Bradlow, Ann, Cynthia Clopper and Rajka Smiljanic (2007). A Perceptual Similarity Space For Languages. Proceedings of the XVIth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, 1373-1376. Saarbrucken, Germany. http://www.icphs2007.de/

Smiljanic, Rajka (2007). Lexical and pragmatic effects on pitch range and low tone alignment in two dialects of Serbian and Croatian. Proceedings of the 39th Regional Meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society, 39-1. 520-539.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2006). Early vs. late focus: pitch-peak alignment in twodialects of Serbian and Croatian. In L. Goldstein, D.H. Whalen, C.T. Best eds., Laboratory Phonology 8, 495-518. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2003). Prosodic Variation and the Expression of Pragmatic Narrow Focus in Two Dialects of Croatian and Serbian. Proceedings of the Prosodic Interfaces 2003 Conference. 185-190. Nantes, France.

Hualde, Jose Ignacio, Gorka Elordieta, Inaki Gaminde and Rajka Smiljanic (2002). From pitch-accent to stress-accent in Basque. In Carlos Gussenhoven & Natasha Warner eds., Laboratory Phonology 7, 547-584. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Hualde, Jose Ignacio, Rajka Smiljanic and Jennifer Cole (2000). On the accented/unaccented distinction in Western Basque and the typology of accentual systems. Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society: General Session and Parasession on Aspect 26: 133-144.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Jose Ignacio Hualde (2000). Lexical and pragmatic functions of tonal alignment in two Serbo-Croatian dialects. In Arika Okrent & John Boyle eds., Chicago Linguistic Society 36.1, 469-482. Chicago: Chicago Linguistic Society.

Presentations, Published Abstracts

Scholarly presentations

Invited talks:

Smiljanic, Rajka (2014). Speech intelligibility and sentence recognition memory in noise. Special Session "Room Acoustic Effects on Speech Comprehension and Recall". Acoustical Society of America Meeting, Indianapolis, IN. October 27-31. 

Smiljanic, Rajka (2014). Non-native clear speech production and perception. To be presented at the 2014 ASHA convention, Orlando, Florida, November 20–22.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2014). Overview of Speech Communication Research. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 135, 2182. Providence, RI. 5-9 May.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Douglas Sladen (2010).Effect of acoustic-phonetic and semantic enhancements on speech recognition for children with cochlear implants. Special session at the 160th ASA Meeting: Psychological and Physiological Acoustics: Hearing Impairment, Hearing Aids, and Cochlear Implants. Cancun, Mexico. 15-19 November.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2008). The effect of linguistic experience on clear speech production and perception. University of Texas at Austin: Communication Sciences and Disorders Department (Production, Perception & Processing and Bilingualism groups). Austin, Texas. October.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2008). Speaking and hearing clearly: Talker and listener factors in speaking style changes. University of Washington, Speech and Hearing sciences Colloquium. Seattle, Washington. March.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2008). Phonetic variation and phonological contrast in hyper-articulated speech. University of Texas at Austin, Department of Linguistics Colloquia. Austin, Texas. February.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2007). Clear speech effect on vowel production across languages. 154th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America. Special session Speech Intelligibility and the Vowel Space. New Orleans, Louisiana. 27 November-1 December.           

Smiljanic, Rajka (2007). Phonetic variation and phonological contrasts: Prosody and clear speech. Department of Phonetics and Linguistics, University College London. London, UK. February.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2006). Production and perception of clear speech. University of Zagreb. Zagreb, Croatia. June.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2005). Production and perception of clear speech in Croatian and English. Linguistic Colloquium, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Urbana-Champaign, Illinois. April.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2004). Phonetic and phonological effects in production and perception of clear speech: A cross-linguistic approach. Linguistics Colloquium, University of Chicago. Chicago, Illinois. November.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2004). Contrast enhancement in two communicative situations: narrow focus and clear speech. Linguistics colloquium, Northwestern University. Evanston, Illinois. September.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2002). Lexical, pragmatic and positional effects on prosody in two dialects of Croatian and Serbian. Linguistics colloquium, Northwestern University. Evanston, Illinois. October.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2001). Lexical and pragmatic effects on prosody in two dialects of Croatian and Serbian. Workshop on tone and intonation in Europe,  University of the Basque Country(organized by Research Network Tone and Intonation in Europe funded by European Science Foundation). Vitoria, Spain. 28-30 June.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2001). Prosodic system(s) of two dialects of Serbian and Croatian: Acoustic correlates of lexical and pragmatic information. Linguistics Colloquium, Department of Linguistics, UIUC. Urbana-Champaign, Illinois. May.

Published abstracts:

The following are talk and poster presentations at the Acoustical Society of America meetings for which the citable abstracts are published in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America.

Blanco, Cindy, Ferracane, Elisa, Yi, Hoyoung and Rajka Smiljanic (2014). Language proficiency, context influence foreign-accent adaptation. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, xxx. Indianapolis, IN. 27-31 October.

Gilbert, Rachael, Cristabella Trimble-Quiz, Karen Johnson and Rajka Smiljanic (2014). Speaking style adaptations across the lifespan. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 135, 2421. Providence, RI. 5-9 May.

Van der Feest, Suzanne and Rajka Smiljanic (2014). Timecourse of word recognition for listener-oriented speaking style adaptations. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 135, 2316. Providence, RI. 5-9 May.

Gilbert, Rachael, Nicholas Victor, Bharath Chandrasekaran and Rajka Smiljanic (2013). Intelligibility of speaking styles elicited by various instructions. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 134 , 4244.

Blanco, Cindy, Emily Tagtow and Rajka Smiljanic (2013). Familiarity with a foreign-accent aids perceptual accent adaptation. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 134 , 4249.  

Smiljanic, Rajka and Bharath Chandrasekaran (2013). Processing speech of varying intelligibility. Special Session at the 165th ASA Meeting: Variability in Speech Intelligibility: Behavioral and Neural perspectives. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 133, 3386.

Smiljanic, Rajka, Stan Sheft, Bharath Chandrasekaran and Valeriy Shafiro (2013). Effect of speech clarity on perception of interrupted meaningful and anomalous sentences. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 133, 3388.

Rao, Gayatri, Rajka Smiljanic and Randy Diehl (2013). Individual variability in phonetic convergence for vowels and rhythm. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 133, 3340.

Boyce, Suzanne, Sarah Hamilton, Joel MacAuslan, Jean Krause, Rajka Smiljanic and Ann Bradlow (2013). Using Landmark Detection to Measure Effective Clear Speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 133, 3391.

Gilbert, Rachael, Bharath Chandrasekaran and Rajka Smiljanic (2012). Recognition memory in noise for speech of varying intelligibility. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 132, 2077.

Beitz, Jasmine, Kristin Van Engen, Rajka Smiljanic and Bharath Chandrasekaran (2012). Effects of visual cue enhancement on speech intelligibility for clear and conversational speech in noise. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 132, 2080.

Van Engen, Kristin, Bharath Chandrasekaran, Lauren Ayres, L, Natalia Czimskey and Rajka Smiljanic (2011). Recognition memory for speech of varying intelligibility. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 130, 2445.

Smiljanic, Rajka, Lauren Calandruccio and Stacey Rimikis (2011). Speech-in-noise perception for new sentence-recognition materials: normative data for a diverse non-native listener population. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 130, 2572.

Rao, Gayatri, Rajka Smiljanic and Randy Diehl (2011). Effect of linguistic background on convergence of prosodic rhythm. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 130, 2553.

Gilbert, Rachael, Douglas Sladen and Rajka Smiljanic (2011). Oral receptive and expressive language skills and word recognition in children with cochlear implants. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 129, 2624.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Douglas Sladen (2011). Speech intelligibility in noise for adult and children users of cochlear implants. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 129, 2662.

Rao, Gayatri and Rajka Smiljanic (2011). Effect of language, speaking style and talker on a spectral rhythm measure. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 129, 2680.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Lauren Calandruccio (2010). Development of the non-native English sentence test for speech recognition. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 128(4), 2486.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Douglas Sladen (2010). Effect of acoustic-phonetic and semantic enhancements on speech recognition for children with cochlear implants. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 128(4), 2425.

Sjerps, Matthias and Rajka Smiljanic (2010). The influence of language background on the relative perception of vowels. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 128(4), 2352.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2009). Native and Non-native Clear Speech Production. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 125(4), Pt. 2, 2753.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2008). Clear speech intelligibility and accentedness ratings for native and non-native talkers and listeners. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 123(5), Pt. 2, 3883.

Boyce, Suzanne, Joel MacAuslan, Ann Bradlow and Rajka Smiljanic (2008). Landmark-Based Analysis of Sleep-Deprived Speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 123(5), Pt. 2, 3887.

            Related popular press:

                    Lay language papers: Acoustics ’08 Paris. Available at http://www.acoustics.org/press/155th/boyce.htm

                    Discovery Channel online: http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/07/14/sleep-speech-deprive.html

Smiljanic, Rajka, Josh Viau and Ann Bradlow (2007). Global Temporal Characteristics of English Clear and Conversational Speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 121(5), Pt. 2, 3043.

Smiljanic, Rajka, Josh Viau and Ann Bradlow (2006). The effect of phonological neighborhood density and word frequency on vowel production and perception in clear speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 120(5), Pt. 2, 3291.

Smiljanic, Rajka, Josh Viau and Ann Bradlow (2006). Rhythm in English Clear Speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 119(5), Pt. 2, 3304.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2005). Does clear speech enhance the voice onset time contrast in Croatian and English? Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 118(3), Pt. 2, 1900.

Konopka, Kenneth, Rajka Smiljanic and Ann Bradlow (2005). Variability in the clear speech intelligibility advantage. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 118(3), Pt. 2, 1931.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2004). Production and perception of clear speech in Croatian and English. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 116(4), Pt. 2, 2627.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2004). Phonetic and Phonological Effects in Production and Perception of Croatian Clear Speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 115(5), Pt. 2, 2395.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2001). Pitch peak alignment as a function of lexical and pragmatic factors in two dialects of Serbian/Croatian. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 109 (5), Pt. 2, 2414.

Other Presentations:

Blanco, Cynthia, Yi, Hoyoung and Rajka Smiljanic (2014). Adaptation to foreign accents: The role of listener language experience and task expectations. Bias in Auditory Perception conference. Aarhus, Denmark, September 18-20.

Ferracane, Elisa, Johnson, Karen, Trimble-Quiz, Cristabella, Gilbert, Rachael C. and Rajka Smiljanic (2014). Speaking Style Adaptations across the Lifespan. UT undergraduate research week.

Tagtow, Emily, Oakley, Maddie, Cook, Gabriela, Blanco, Cynthia P., and Rajka Smiljanic (2014). Exposure to Foreign Accented Speech Aids Listeners’ Speech Perception. UT undergraduate research week.

Niamh, Kelly and Rajka Smiljanic (2014). “Monosyllabic Lexical Pitch Contrasts in Norwegian.” Speech Prosody conference. Dublin, Ireland. 20-23 May.

Niamh, Kelly and Rajka Smiljanic (2014). “The Effects of Pragmatic Focus on Norwegian Tonal Accent.” 4th International Symposium on Tonal Aspects of Languages in Nijmegen, The Netherlands. 13-16 May.

Gilbert, Rachael and Rajka Smiljanic (2013). Speaking style adaptations produced by older and young adults. Aging and Speech Communication conference, Indiana University. Bloomington, Indiana. 6-9 October.

Yi, Han-Gyol, Rajka Smiljanic and Bharath Chandrasekaran (2013). Natural variations in speech intelligibility: An fMRI study. Poster presented at the Institute for Neuroscience 17th Annual Symposium.

Yi, Han-Gyol, Rajka Smiljanic and Bharath Chandrasekaran (2013). Natural variations in speech intelligibility: An fMRI study. 19th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping.

Sladen, Douglas and Rajka Smiljanic (2012). The influence of acoustic and semantic enhancements on speech in noise recognition for children with normal hearing and children with cochlear implants. NHS 2012 - Beyond Newborn Hearing Screening. Infant and Childhood Hearing in Science and Clinical Practice.  

Gilbert, Rachael, Kristin Van Engen, Bharath Chandrasekaran and Rajka Smiljanic (2012). Effects of speech clarity on recognition memory for spoken sentences in quiet and in noise. Poster presented at the Graduate Research Showcase, University of Texas at Austin.

Rimikis, Stacey, Lauren Calandruccio and Rajka Smiljanic (2011). Normative data on New Sentence-Recognition Materials for Non-Native English Speakers. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

Clopper, Cynthia and Rajka Smiljanic (2011). Regional Variation in Temporal Organization in American English. Presented at the Ilse Lehiste Memorial Symposium, Ohio State University.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2011). Intelligibility of speech produced by older talkers. Aging and Speech Communication conference.

Gilbert, Rachael, Douglas Sladen, and Rajka Smiljanic (2011). Oral Language Skills and Word Recognition for Children with and without Cochlear Implants. 13th Symposium on Cochlear Implants in Children.

Rao, Gayatri and Rajka Smiljanic (2011). Effect of native language background, speaking style and age on rhythmic variation. XVIIth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences.

Sladen, Douglas and Rajka Smiljanic (2011). Children and Adults with Cochlear Implants: Effect of Age on use of Acoustic-Phonetic and Semantic Enhancements. American Auditory Society Meeting.

Rimikis, Stacey, Weintraub, Ott, Rajka Smiljanic and Lauren Calandruccio (2010). Reducing linguistic biases: sentence materials developed for non-native English speakers. ASHA.

Armstrong Meghan, Rajka Smiljanic and Cynthia Clopper (2008). Pause distribution in three American English dialects: Southern, Midland and Mid-Atlantic.  New Ways of Analyzing Variation 37.

Boyce, Suzanne, Joel MacAuslan, Ann Bradlow and Rajka Smiljanic (2007). Automatic Detection of Differences between Clear and Conversational Speech. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention.  

Clopper, Cynthia and Rajka Smiljanic (2006). Regional Prosodic Variation in American English: Midland vs.  South. New Ways of Analyzing Variation 35, Ohio State University.

Smiljanic, Rajka, Josh Viau and Ann Bradlow (2006). Lexical effects on vowel production and perception in clear speech. Third International Workshop on Language Production.

Smiljanic, Rajka, Josh Viau and Ann Bradlow (2006). Word and Syllable Boundary Strengthening in English Clear Speech. 10th Conference on Laboratory Phonology.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2004). Contrast enhancement in Serbian. From Sound to Sense: 50+ Years of Discoveries in Speech Communication. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Smiljanic, Rajka and Ann Bradlow (2004). Contrast enhancement in Croatian clear speech. 9th Conference on Laboratory Phonology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2004). Prosodic variation in Serbian and Croatian: An experimental approach. 14th Biennial Conference on Balkan Linguistics, Literature and Folklore. University of Mississippi.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2003). Lexical and pragmatic effects on pitch range and low tone alignment in two dialects of Serbian and Croatian. Chicago Linguistic Society 39, University of Chicago.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2003). Prosodic variation and the expression of pragmatic narrow focus in two dialects of Croatian and Serbian. Prosodic Interfaces Conference.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2002). Early vs. late focus: pitch-peak alignment in two dialects of Serbian and Croatian. 8th Conference on Laboratory Phonology, Yale University and Haskins Laboratories.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2002). Lexical contrast maintenance and expression of narrow focus in two dialects of Serbian and Croatian. Second International Conference on Contrast in Phonology, University of Toronto.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2002). How do speakers express emphasis and focus in speech? Research on prosody. Poster presentation of the Computational Linguistics group at the Beckman Institute Open House, UIUC.

Smiljanic, Rajka (2000). Pitch-accent and stress-accent in Basque and the typology of accentual systems. 7th Conference on Laboratory Phonology, University of Nijmegen and Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics.

Smiljanic, Rajka and Jose Ignacio Hualde (2000). Lexical and pragmatic functions of tonal alignment in two Serbo-Croatian dialects. Chicago Linguistic Society 36, University of Chicago.

Jose Ignacio Hualde, Rajka Smiljanic and Jennifer S. Cole (2000). On the accented/unaccented distinction in Western Basque and the typology of accentual systems. Berkeley Linguistics Society 26, UC Berkeley.

Jose Ignacio Hualde, Rajka Smiljanic and Jennifer S. Cole (1999). The accented/unaccented distinction in Western Basque. Mid-Continent Workshop on Phonology 5, Illinois State University.

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