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Richard P. Meier, Chair CLA 4.304, Mailcode B5100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1701

Eric Campbell

Assistant Instructor

Contact

Interests

Linguistic description and theory, historical linguistics, language documentation, linguistic typology, lexical semantics, and lexicography, Mesoamerica, Otomanguean languages

LIN S345 • Lang Change And Lang Variation

86135 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm SAC 5.102
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This course is an introduction to the study of how languages change and the principles and methods that linguists use to describe and account for language change. We will investigate the linguistic and social motivations for change and explore change in sound systems, word structure, word meaning, and grammar. Using data from languages spoken today and/or extinct languages preserved in writing, students will learn how to reconstruct the vocabularies and grammars of earlier, prehistoric stages of those languages and make hypotheses about the cultural prehistory of their speakers.Requirements: Class sessions will include lecture, discussion, and problem solving using data from a wide range of languages.Grading: homework assignments (60%) and two exams (40%)Texts: Historical Linguistics: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, by Lyle Campbell (ISBN: 978-0-262-53267-9); and supplementary readings.Prerequisites: LIN 306, LIN 344K

LIN S345 • Lang Change And Lang Variation

86370 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BEN 1.108
show description

This course is an introduction to the study of how languages change and the principles and methods that linguists use to describe and account for language change. We will investigate the linguistic and social motivations for change and explore change in sound systems, word structure, word meaning, and grammar. Using data from languages spoken today and/or extinct languages preserved in writing, students will learn how to reconstruct the vocabularies and grammars of earlier, prehistoric stages of those languages and make hypotheses about the cultural prehistory of their speakers.Requirements: Class sessions will include lecture, discussion, and problem solving using data from a wide range of languages.Grading: homework assignments (60%) and two exams (40%)Texts: Historical Linguistics: An Introduction, 2nd Edition, by Lyle Campbell (ISBN: 978-0-262-53267-9); and supplementary readings.Prerequisites: LIN 306, LIN 344K

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

40745 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 303
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This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

40650 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 101
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This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

LIN F345 • Lang Change And Lang Variation

86305 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BEN 1.108
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Course DescriptionAn introduction to the study of how languages change and to theprinciples developed by linguists to account for these changes. Thecourse will investigate the social and linguistic motivations forchange and learn about change in sound systems, word structure, wordmeaning, and grammar. Students will also learn the methods linguistshave developed for reconstructing the vocabularies and grammars of  theprehistoric parent languages of languages which exist today, or  whichhave been preserved in writing.Requirements:Classes will be a mix of lectures, discussion, and problem solvingusing data from a wide range of languages. Grade is based on homeworkassignments (60%), two in-class examinations (40%).Textbook:"An Introduction to Historical Linguistics" by Terry Crowley andClaire Bowern (ISBN: 9780195365542), and supplementary readings.

LIN 312 • Languages Around The World

41440 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GAR 2.112
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Department of Linguistics: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/linguistics  Linguists classify human languages into "families" of related languages that share a common ancestor. We will embark on a linguistic tour of the world and explore the patterns of how these language families are spread around the globe. What does it mean for languages to be related, and how do we know that they are related in the first place? Why are there only a handful of language families in Europe and Africa while there are scores in South America and New Guinea? What can we say about where a language or language family may have originated? And how much living history is being lost as languages become endangered or extinct when people stop speaking them? We will address these questions by investigating three things: (1) how the current distribution of languages is a result of earlier civilizations, historical events, and the movements of peoples; (2) how modern languages contain "buried" information about human prehistory; and (3) how linguistics and other fields such as archaeology, geography and the study of ancient writing systems complement (or sometimes fail to complement) one another in the study of the human past. 

Course Goals 

  • Gain a basic knowledge of how many languages are in the world, where they are spoken, how they are related to each other, and how they have come to be where they are 
  • Learn some of the basic tools that linguists use to study language history and linguistic structure, becoming prepared to pursue further study in linguistics and related disciplines 
  • Develop an appreciation for linguistic diversity and its importance for science as well as human communities, and gain an understanding of approaches to addressing the current global crisis of language endangerment  

Readings: This is a reading-intensive course. All readings must be completed by the day they appear on the schedule. There are two required books, available at the University Co-op bookstore. 

Diamond, Jared. 1997. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The fates of human societies. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. 

Evans, Nicholas. 2009. Dying Words: Endangered Languages and What They Have to Tell Us. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. 

Other readings are available on Blackboard: https://courses.utexas.edu. 

Grading: The new plus/minus system will be used for final grades. Final grades will be calculated as follows: 

35% Paper (10% -First Draft; 15% -Final Draft; 10% -In-class presentation) 

20% Exam 1 - Oct 9 

20% Exam 2 - Nov 20 

15% Quizzes 

10% Assignments 

 Blackboard: Familiarize yourself with Blackboard and check it regularly for announcements. Blackboard is the website where you can access all course materials, including this syllabus, readings, your grades, lecture notes, links to websites, etc. https://courses.utexas.edu

Email: If you want to contact me outside of class, send me an email with the words: LIN 312 followed by the class time, 1:00 or 2:00, in the subject line of the message.

Office Hours: Office hours are extra time to ask questions, clarify material, and explore in more depth topics that interest you. If you want to speak to me and cannot make it to office hours due to schedule conflicts, email me to set up an appointment.

Paper: You will write a paper in which you explore one of the topics covered in the course (or a related topic) in more depth. The paper is to be 4-6 typed double-spaced pages with 1" margins, and must include at least 3 external sources of information. More guidelines and topic ideas will be given out later in the semester. The paper is evaluated in three parts: first draft, final draft, and a short oral presentation in class.

Exams: Exams cannot be made up. Exams will take place during class time in our regular classroom. The exams will cover material from the lectures, readings, and films. Each exam day is preceded by a day of in-class review. 

Quizzes: There are seven quizzes on world regional geography. They can not be made up. Study and practice versions are on Blackboard. This is just rote memorization, and there will be no surprises. The idea is that some, or much, of it will stick, which will assist you in gaining a deeper understanding of the readings and the world. 

Assignments: Assignments are due at the beginning of the class period the day they are due. An assignment may be turned in at the beginning of the next class period with no penalty only if you have an excused absence (see Attendance). Without an excused absence, homework may be turned in no later than the beginning of the class period following the due date, for a maximum of half credit. Follow instructions fully and read all questions carefully, always. You may discuss homework with your classmates, but the work you turn in must be your own. You must include the names of any people you discussed the homework with on the top of the first page of your homework. Any copying or failing to independently write up your work is considered scholastic dishonesty (see Academic Integrity below). 

All assignments must be typewritten (unless otherwise noted). On the first page, include the following information: your name; "LIN 312" and meeting time; and the date. 

Attendance: Attendance will not figure directly into your grade but will be important to your success in the class, since much of the material covered in class will not be from the readings. To secure an excused absence for purposes of a homework extension, email me BEFORE the class you will miss to let me know. Proper documentation may be required (i.e. doctor's note). 

Cell phones and computers: Cell phones must be switched off before you enter class. Computers may be used for taking notes only, and this policy may be changed if needed. 

Special Needs: If you have special needs of any kind, please let me know so that we can attempt to meet these needs throughout the semester. The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY. 

Religious Holidays: If any class deadlines fall on religious holidays that you observe, please let me know at least two weeks in advance so that I can accommodate your needs. You should both tell me in person and send me an email. 

Academic Integrity 

I take any form of cheating very seriously and you will be referred to the Dean of Students if caught. This includes cheating on quizzes or exams or copying homework. Do not do it. It isn’t worth it. 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. For further information please visit the Student Judicial Services Web site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs. 

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

40465 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 208
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

40470 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 0.132
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

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