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Anthony C. Woodbury, Chair CLA 4.304, Mailcode B5100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1701

Sarah Wagner

Assistant Instructor Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Contact

Interests

Sociolinguistics; Language, Gender and Sexuality; Family Talk

LIN S350 • Language And People

86386 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BEN 1.108
(also listed as WGS S345 )
show description

LIN 350 "Language and People" is a topics course on those aspects of sociolinguistics and historical linguistics which enjoy the greatest interest among students of language and linguistics. Some of the topics covered will be from among: gender and language; the origins of language and writing systems; language and politics; how languages differ from each other; the Nostratic Theory; accent and social stratification; nonverbal communication; language, ethnicity, and nationalism. Course content will be adjusted according to the interests of the students in the class. The course will consist of both lectures and class discussions. The grade in the course will be based on attendance and participation, short tests, and a few short reports. TextsThe required reading for the course will be provided in a Course Packet Additional texts: Keith Walters and Michal Brody, What's language got to do with it?. W.W. Norton, 2005, paperback, ISBN 0-393-97884-2

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

41075 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 306
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask

 

Texts
Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

40640 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 101
show description

Course Description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask
Texts

Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 9th edition

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

41065 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 206
show description

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

41395 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 306
show description

Course Description:

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. We will explore many questions throughout the semester. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask!

Texts

Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 8th edition.  Available at the Co-op.

 Class Policies: 

Attendance:  You’re expected to attend class on time every day.  Not everything in the book will be covered, and not everything covered will be in the book.  Aside from University-approved absences (official activities, religious holidays, military service), you may miss, for whatever reason, up to 3 classes.  After that, for each class missed, you will receive 2.5 points off of your final grade. For example, if you miss 5 classes total and your final grade is an 83 (B), you will receive a 78 (C) in the course. This is roughly equivalent to lowering your grade one level for every four classes missed, beyond the 3 freebies. Extended illnesses and other real emergencies will be addressed on a case-by-case basis & will require documentation. Please contact me as soon as you can.

Cell phones:  Turn ‘em off!  Also, please get your water, phone calls and other needs taken care of before class starts.

Participation:  This course will be mostly lectures with some discussion.  I expect that everyone will join in discussions and will ask questions regularly.  Please respect your classmates’ different skills, opinions, needs, and goals for the semester. 

Homework:  Late homework will not be accepted.  You are responsible for keeping track of due dates for assignments.  More information on homework is included at the end of the syllabus.

Blackboard: I use Blackboard to post extra readings, the syllabus and grades.  If you do not know how to use it, ask a classmate or come and see me during office hours.

Academic honesty:  I take academic honesty very seriously.  While I you are welcome to work together to figure out the concepts necessary for answering homework questions, you must make sure that you are turning in your own answers.  Plagiarism and collusion are impermissible.  In the case of academic dishonesty, intended or not, the possible penalty ranges from failing the assignment to expulsion from the University.  It is your responsibility to learn about this subject—it that can affect you in academic as well as in non-academic careers.  If you haven’t already, go to http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.  They’ve got a good, short tutorial that should answer most of your questions.  If you are ever in doubt, ask me.

Special Needs

If you have any special needs associated with any learning or physical disability, please feel free to let me know.  Before course accommodations can be made, you may be required to provide documentation for the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities.  Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Grading

Following is the coursework required for this class, and the grading scale.  For your final grade, I will give pluses and minuses.

Exams: 60% (3 at 20% each)

There will be three exams, each over approximately a third of the course.  There is no final exam.  Please note:  I do not curve test grades, nor can you make up a missed test!

Quiz: 10%

There will be one quiz on transcription.

 Homework: 30%

There are eleven homework assignments total.  You will be able to drop your lowest grade.  Each of the remaining assignments is worth 3% of your final grade.

Homework Assignments

Your homework is due at the beginning of class on the day it is due.  No late homework will be accepted.  If you won’t be in class—even for an excused absence—make sure your homework gets to me the class before or through a friend. I do not accept homework by email.

These are general guidelines for formatting your homework.  All assignments must be typed.  If you run out of black ink at 2am the night before your assignment is due, you may use very dark blue or green instead.  I will not accept excuses such as “my printer broke” or “I ran out of ink” or “I emailed it to myself, but now it won’t download” for no homework.

¯    At the top of your first page, aligned left or right and single-spaced, please make sure to have the following information:  your name, date, my name, class (include class time), name of assignment. 

¯    Please use 11 or 12-point font, 1-1.5 inch margins and always number your pages.

¯    Staple your papers.  Don’t ask me for a stapler—you’re an adult and can find one on your own.

Other Resources

¯    Use my office hours!  That’s what I’m there for—come with homework questions, questions on writing, time management, research or other things.

¯    Make use of the Undergraduate Writing Center.  http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/uwc/ Students I’ve had in several classes have found them very helpful. 

¯    Get yourself to the PCL.  There are librarians who specialize in different areas of research: Susan Macicak is the linguistics specialist.  She can help you learn more about specific topics, find sources, and use different library tools.  You can also ask general questions of a librarian on-line or in person.

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

41400 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CBA 4.344
show description

Course Description:

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. We will explore many questions throughout the semester. How are human languages structured? Do humans have an innate capacity for language? How do children learn language? How is adult language learning different? How did the languages of the world evolve? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communication? Is there a "universal grammar"? How diverse and different are the languages of the world? How much does "language endangerment" and language extinction around the world affect global cultural diversity? Should every country have one "official" language? Are standard languages preferable to regional dialects? In short, this class is about everything you always wanted to know about language, and maybe a few things you never even thought to ask!

Texts

Fromkin, Rodman, & Hyams. An Introduction to Language. 8th edition.  Available at the Co-op.

 Class Policies: 

Attendance:  You’re expected to attend class on time every day.  Not everything in the book will be covered, and not everything covered will be in the book.  Aside from University-approved absences (official activities, religious holidays, military service), you may miss, for whatever reason, up to 3 classes.  After that, for each class missed, you will receive 2.5 points off of your final grade. For example, if you miss 5 classes total and your final grade is an 83 (B), you will receive a 78 (C) in the course. This is roughly equivalent to lowering your grade one level for every four classes missed, beyond the 3 freebies. Extended illnesses and other real emergencies will be addressed on a case-by-case basis & will require documentation. Please contact me as soon as you can.

Cell phones:  Turn ‘em off!  Also, please get your water, phone calls and other needs taken care of before class starts.

Participation:  This course will be mostly lectures with some discussion.  I expect that everyone will join in discussions and will ask questions regularly.  Please respect your classmates’ different skills, opinions, needs, and goals for the semester. 

Homework:  Late homework will not be accepted.  You are responsible for keeping track of due dates for assignments.  More information on homework is included at the end of the syllabus.

Blackboard: I use Blackboard to post extra readings, the syllabus and grades.  If you do not know how to use it, ask a classmate or come and see me during office hours.

Academic honesty:  I take academic honesty very seriously.  While I you are welcome to work together to figure out the concepts necessary for answering homework questions, you must make sure that you are turning in your own answers.  Plagiarism and collusion are impermissible.  In the case of academic dishonesty, intended or not, the possible penalty ranges from failing the assignment to expulsion from the University.  It is your responsibility to learn about this subject—it that can affect you in academic as well as in non-academic careers.  If you haven’t already, go to http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.  They’ve got a good, short tutorial that should answer most of your questions.  If you are ever in doubt, ask me.

Special Needs

If you have any special needs associated with any learning or physical disability, please feel free to let me know.  Before course accommodations can be made, you may be required to provide documentation for the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities.  Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Grading

Following is the coursework required for this class, and the grading scale.  For your final grade, I will give pluses and minuses.

Exams: 60% (3 at 20% each)

There will be three exams, each over approximately a third of the course.  There is no final exam.  Please note:  I do not curve test grades, nor can you make up a missed test!

Quiz: 10%

There will be one quiz on transcription.

 Homework: 30%

There are eleven homework assignments total.  You will be able to drop your lowest grade.  Each of the remaining assignments is worth 3% of your final grade.

Homework Assignments

Your homework is due at the beginning of class on the day it is due.  No late homework will be accepted.  If you won’t be in class—even for an excused absence—make sure your homework gets to me the class before or through a friend. I do not accept homework by email.

These are general guidelines for formatting your homework.  All assignments must be typed.  If you run out of black ink at 2am the night before your assignment is due, you may use very dark blue or green instead.  I will not accept excuses such as “my printer broke” or “I ran out of ink” or “I emailed it to myself, but now it won’t download” for no homework.

¯    At the top of your first page, aligned left or right and single-spaced, please make sure to have the following information:  your name, date, my name, class (include class time), name of assignment. 

¯    Please use 11 or 12-point font, 1-1.5 inch margins and always number your pages.

¯    Staple your papers.  Don’t ask me for a stapler—you’re an adult and can find one on your own.

Other Resources

¯    Use my office hours!  That’s what I’m there for—come with homework questions, questions on writing, time management, research or other things.

¯    Make use of the Undergraduate Writing Center.  http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/uwc/ Students I’ve had in several classes have found them very helpful. 

¯    Get yourself to the PCL.  There are librarians who specialize in different areas of research: Susan Macicak is the linguistics specialist.  She can help you learn more about specific topics, find sources, and use different library tools.  You can also ask general questions of a librarian on-line or in person.

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

LIN 312 • Intro To Language And Gender

40500 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 206
(also listed as WGS 301 )
show description

One of the most vibrant and cutting-edge fields of sociolinguistics is the study of language and gender. Beginning in the 1970s, this field has expanded and changed tremendously. Further developing the classic language and gender studies, current research continues to challenge our assumptions about how women and men speak by examining how we
create our selves through our language choices.

In this course, you will gain a fundamental understanding of the main issues in gender and language research by looking at the history and development of the field and the current issues confronting researchers. In addition, you will learn basic sociolinguistic methodologies throughout the semester. Over the second half of the semester, you will put these methodologies to use by doing a short field research project in which you will collect, analyze, and report on your own data, both in a final presentation and a paper.

LIN 312 • Intro To Language And Gender

40505 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 206
(also listed as WGS 301 )
show description

One of the most vibrant and cutting-edge fields of sociolinguistics is the study of language and gender. Beginning in the 1970s, this field has expanded and changed tremendously. Further developing the classic language and gender studies, current research continues to challenge our assumptions about how women and men speak by examining how we
create our selves through our language choices.

In this course, you will gain a fundamental understanding of the main issues in gender and language research by looking at the history and development of the field and the current issues confronting researchers. In addition, you will learn basic sociolinguistic methodologies throughout the semester. Over the second half of the semester, you will put these methodologies to use by doing a short field research project in which you will collect, analyze, and report on your own data, both in a final presentation and a paper.

Dissertation Survey

Link to survey

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