Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
mes masthead
Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

Silences of a Living Past: The Armenian Question Revisited

Tue, November 3, 2009 • 1:00 PM • Texas Union, Sinclair Suite (3.128)

Silences of a Living Past: The Armenian Question Revisited

a panel discussion by
Ayse Gül Altınay, Sabancı University
Neery Melkonian, independent curator
Ruken Sengül, University of Texas

In recent years, a collective longing and nostalgia for the complexities and multicultural nature of the Ottoman Empire has emerged in certain circles in Turkey.  In this historic panel bringing together  Turkish,  Armenian, and Kurdish scholars, we will examine a sensitive yet emerging—and understudied—topic through three presentations:

(Unraveling) Layers of Gendered Silencing: Converted Armenian Survivors of the 1915 Catastrophe
Ayse Gül Altınay, a prominent Turkish anthropologist, will speak about her recent work dealing with specific ways of remembering and forgetting Armenian women and men (converted/adopted) through the contemporary “coming out” stories of their grandchildren.

Blind Dates: Mending Representational Gaps through Contemporary Art and Curatorial Practice
Neery Melkonian, a distinguished free-lance art historian, will discuss the traces of the peoples, places and cultures that once constituted the complex geography of the Ottoman Empire (1299-1922) from the prism of contemporary lived experience as translated by visual artists.

The Breakfast, the Sword Leftover and the Absent Cosmopolitan:  Specters of the Armenian Neighbor in a Kurdifying Diyarbakır
Serap Ruken Sengül, a doctoral candidate in Anthropology, will talk about how shifting modalities of remembering the Armenians have inscribed debates about Kurdish identity and history in Diyarbakır.

This panel in the Turkish Studies Lecture Series is co-sponsored by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies,
the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies, and the Department of Anthropology.

Sponsored by: The Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies, and the Department of Anthropology


Bookmark and Share
bottom border