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Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

"Other People's Help: How to Study Slavery in Cultures not your own"

Fri, October 14, 2011 • 3:00 PM • Texas Union Sinclair Suite (3.128)

History Lecture Series
"Other People's Help: How to Study Slavery in Cultures not your own"

Eve M. Troutt Powell, Associate Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania
Friday, October 14, 2011
3:00 PM
Texas Union, Sinclair Suite (3.128)

This talk will begin with a brief examination of the controversy surrounding the film and book, The Help, here in the United States, then explore Dr. Troutt Powell's own work in narratives of enslavement in the Middle East.  She will talk about exploring the narratives of a group of national or religious leaders, all of whom were born by 1881 and dead by 1965, and all of whom had either been slaves or slaveowners in Egypt, Sudan and the late Ottoman Empire.

Eve M. Troutt Powell is the author of A Different Shade of Colonialism: Egypt, Great Britain and the Mastery of the Sudan (University of California, 2003) and the co-editor, with John Hunwick, of The African Diaspora in the Mediterranean Lands of Islam (Princeton Series on the Middle East, Markus Wiener Press, 2002). She has also written a number of articles on the history of African slavery in the Nile valley, and on Saint Josephine Bakhita, a former Sudanese slave canonized in 2000. Troutt Powell is now working on a book about the memory of slavery in the Nile valley, which examines how slaves and slaveholders wrote, sang or talked about the experience of servitude and its meaning in their societies. Both her research and her teaching explore the relationship between Africa and the Middle East.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the Department of History, the Institute for Historical Studies, and the John L. Warfield Center for African and African-American Studies.

Sponsored by: Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the Department of History, the Institute for Historical Studies, and the John L. Warfield Center for African and African-American Studies


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