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Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

Kamran Scot Aghaie

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1999, University of California at Los Angeles

Chair, Department of Middle Eastern Studies. Associate Professor
Kamran Scot Aghaie

Contact

Biography

Research

modern Islamic history; Shi'i symbols and rituals in modern Iran; modern Iranian history; Shi'ism; Islamic rituals; social and cultural history; religious and political discourses; historiography; nationalism; gender studies; Persian; Arabic; popular Islam

Research Subject Headings: Gender, Nation and national identity, Politics, Religion

Interests

Islamic studies, Shi'ism, modern Iranian and Middle Eastern history; secondary areas of interest: world history, historiography, religious studies, nationalism, gender studies and economic history

MES 385 • Islamic Revolution Of Iran

42440 • Fall 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as HIS 388K, R S 390T )
show description

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the Islamic Revolution that took place in Iran in 1978-­‐79. In order to provide an appropriate historical context for the study of the revolution students will be exposed to a broad survey of Shi'ism and Modern Iranian History. Students will learn the many theories regarding why the revolution happened, what factors contributed to its development, and how Iranian society, culture, politics, and religious beliefs and practices were affected by the revolution. In addition to weekly reading assignments, students will discuss these texts and present their research in class. In addition to class participation, students will write a graduate level research paper, as well as a short proposal for this paper.

Texts

Course packet containing selected articles and texts will be assigned.

Grading

Class participation 30%

Short paper (due week ten) 20%

Research paper (due at end of semester) 50%

MES 385 • Mod Iranian Hist & Historiog

41985 • Spring 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.122
(also listed as HIS 388K )
show description

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the historical developments in Modern Iran. Students will learn how Iranian society, culture, and politics have evolved throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This course will also introduce students to many of the key debates in the field of Modern Iranian history. Students will read, analyze, and discuss selected titles from a list of the most influential scholarly books on Modern Iranian History. Readings in primary historical documents will also be required. Whenever possible, these will be in the original Persian language. However, for students who do not have sufficient Persian language skills, translations will be used. One of the goals of the course is to give students the necessary research and writing skills, along with the requisite knowledge of the field, to conduct meaningful research in the area of Modern Iranian History.

Texts:

A Course Packet, available for purchase at Speedway Copies, which is located on the ground floor of Dobie Mall

Grading:

Class participation                                                       25%

Short paper (due in week nine)                                    25%

Analytical paper on one week’s readings                    10%

Research paper (due at end of semester)                     40%

ISL 373 • Modern Iran

41556 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 216
(also listed as HIS 331L, MES 324K )
show description

Course Description

This is an introductory class to the history of the Middle East in the 20^th century. The main question for consideration is which forces and what sort of developments transformed this region from a relatively peaceful region to a radicalized environment and a source for opposition against the “West.” By exploring critical political, social, intellectual and economic themes such as colonialism, Arab nationalism, secular modernism, the impact of Zionism and military conflict, the rise of political Islam, the status of women and the oil revolution, we would identify the main internal and external forces, as well as the critical processes, that shaped the region during the last century. Conducted in English. 

 

Texts

Abrahamian: A History of Modern Iran

Ansari: Modern Iran since 1921

Keddie: Modern Iran

Satrapi: Persopolis

 

Grading & Requirements

Class attendance and participation: 25%

Quiz grade: 15%

Midterm exam: 30%

Final exam: 30%

MES 324K • Modern Iran

41726 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 216
(also listed as HIS 331L, ISL 373 )
show description

Course Description

This is an introductory class to the history of the Middle East in the 20^th century. The main question for consideration is which forces and what sort of developments transformed this region from a relatively peaceful region to a radicalized environment and a source for opposition against the “West.” By exploring critical political, social, intellectual and economic themes such as colonialism, Arab nationalism, secular modernism, the impact of Zionism and military conflict, the rise of political Islam, the status of women and the oil revolution, we would identify the main internal and external forces, as well as the critical processes, that shaped the region during the last century. Conducted in English. 

 

Texts

Abrahamian: A History of Modern Iran

Ansari: Modern Iran since 1921

Keddie: Modern Iran

Satrapi: Persopolis

 

Grading & Requirements

Class attendance and participation: 25%

Quiz grade: 15%

Midterm exam: 30%

Final exam: 30%

MES 385 • Islamic Rev Of Iran, 1978-90

41795 • Spring 2012
Meets W 1200pm-300pm PAR 210
(also listed as HIS 388K )
show description

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the Islamic Revolution that took place in Iran in 1978-­‐79. In order to provide an appropriate historical context for the study of the revolution students will be exposed to a broad survey of Shi'ism and Modern Iranian History. Students will learn the many theories regarding why the revolution happened, what factors contributed to its development, and how Iranian society, culture, politics, and religious beliefs and practices were affected by the revolution. In addition to weekly reading assignments, students will discuss these texts and present their research in class. In addition to class participation, students will write a graduate level research paper, as well as a short proposal for this paper.

 

Texts

Course packet containing selected articles and texts will be assigned.

 

Grading

Class participation 30%

Short paper (due week ten) 20%

Research paper (due at end of semester) 50%

ARA 387 • Shi'Ite Polit/Relig Ideologues

41630 • Spring 2011
Meets T 500pm-800pm MEZ 1.206
(also listed as HIS 388K, MES 381, PRS 384C )
show description

Students will learn about modern Shi'ism by focusing on the religious and political writings of selected Shi'i scholar, theologians and intellectuals, including the doctrines and symbols of modern Shi'ism, while at the same time learning about broader trans-national historical and political trends affecting Iran, Iraq and Lebanon. The course will focus on selected Shi'i ideologues, including prominent Iranian figures like Ruhollah Khomeini, Ali Shari'ati, Morteza Motahhari, and Abd al-Karim Sorush, as well as Iraqi and Lebanese figures like Musa al-Sadr, Mehdi Shams al-Din, Ali al-Sistani, Muhammad Husayn Fadl Allah, and Muhammad Baqir al-Sadr. Students will read two scholarly articles per week (in English) about the selcted ideologue for that week, as well as one 10-20 page selection from the writings of that figure (in both Persian and Arabic). Students can read either the Persian or the Arabic version. A separate discussion section of one hour per week in each language can be arranged based on student demand and interest. For students who are more advanced in language, additional texts can also be incorporated in the coursework on an informal basis.

Requirements:

Weekly readings, class discussions and presentations (in English), a translation into English of one short text, a short paper (10-15 pages), and a long paper (15-25 pages), using primary sources.

 

Grading:

Class participation    20%

Translation of one of the Persian/Arabic texts 15% Short paper (due in week nine)    25%

Research paper (due at end of semester)    40%

ISL 310 • Introduction To Islam

41895 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.306
(also listed as HIS 306N, R S 319 )
show description

This course provides an introduction to the religion of Islam. It is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, in religion, or in History. We will examine the theology, history, and main social and legal institutions of Islam. Islam, as a major system of belief in the world, is experienced by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. Consequently, besides studying the basic tenets and texts of the religion, this course will focus on the variety of ways in which Muslims and non-Muslims have understood and interpreted Islam. We will review the debates surrounding the life of the prophet of Islam, Islamic pre-modern and modern history, the Islamic concept of God and society, the role of women, and finally, Islamic government and movements. The course is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, religions, or history. No prior knowledge of Islam or Islamic history is necessary.

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

MES 381 • Shi'Ite Polit/Relig Ideologues

42230 • Spring 2011
Meets T 500pm-800pm MEZ 1.206
(also listed as ARA 387, HIS 388K, PRS 384C )
show description

Students will learn about modern Shi'ism by focusing on the religious and political writings of selected Shi'i scholar, theologians and intellectuals, including the doctrines and symbols of modern Shi'ism, while at the same time learning about broader trans-national historical and political trends affecting Iran, Iraq and Lebanon. The course will focus on selected Shi'i ideologues, including prominent Iranian figures like Ruhollah Khomeini, Ali Shari'ati, Morteza Motahhari, and Abd al-Karim Sorush, as well as Iraqi and Lebanese figures like Musa al-Sadr, Mehdi Shams al-Din, Ali al-Sistani, Muhammad Husayn Fadl Allah, and Muhammad Baqir al-Sadr. Students will read two scholarly articles per week (in English) about the selcted ideologue for that week, as well as one 10-20 page selection from the writings of that figure (in both Persian and Arabic). Students can read either the Persian or the Arabic version. A separate discussion section of one hour per week in each language can be arranged based on student demand and interest. For students who are more advanced in language, additional texts can also be incorporated in the coursework on an informal basis.

Requirements:

Weekly readings, class discussions and presentations (in English), a translation into English of one short text, a short paper (10-15 pages), and a long paper (15-25 pages), using primary sources.

 

Grading:

Class participation    20%

Translation of one of the Persian/Arabic texts 15% Short paper (due in week nine)    25%

Research paper (due at end of semester)    40%

PRS 384C • Shi'Ite Polit/Relig Ideologues

42375 • Spring 2011
Meets T 500pm-800pm MEZ 1.206
(also listed as ARA 387, HIS 388K, MES 381 )
show description

Students will learn about modern Shi'ism by focusing on the religious and political writings of selected Shi'i scholar, theologians and intellectuals, including the doctrines and symbols of modern Shi'ism, while at the same time learning about broader trans-national historical and political trends affecting Iran, Iraq and Lebanon. The course will focus on selected Shi'i ideologues, including prominent Iranian figures like Ruhollah Khomeini, Ali Shari'ati, Morteza Motahhari, and Abd al-Karim Sorush, as well as Iraqi and Lebanese figures like Musa al-Sadr, Mehdi Shams al-Din, Ali al-Sistani, Muhammad Husayn Fadl Allah, and Muhammad Baqir al-Sadr. Students will read two scholarly articles per week (in English) about the selcted ideologue for that week, as well as one 10-20 page selection from the writings of that figure (in both Persian and Arabic). Students can read either the Persian or the Arabic version. A separate discussion section of one hour per week in each language can be arranged based on student demand and interest. For students who are more advanced in language, additional texts can also be incorporated in the coursework on an informal basis.

Requirements:

Weekly readings, class discussions and presentations (in English), a translation into English of one short text, a short paper (10-15 pages), and a long paper (15-25 pages), using primary sources.

 

Grading:

Class participation    20%

Translation of one of the Persian/Arabic texts 15% Short paper (due in week nine)    25%

Research paper (due at end of semester)    40%

ISL 310 • Introduction To Islam

42270 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.306
show description

This course provides an introduction to the religion of Islam. It is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, in religion, or in History. We will examine the theology, history, and main social and legal institutions of Islam. Islam, as a major system of belief in the world, is experienced by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. Consequently, besides studying the basic tenets and texts of the religion, this course will focus on the variety of ways in which Muslims and non-Muslims have understood and interpreted Islam. We will review the debates surrounding the life of the prophet of Islam, Islamic pre-modern and modern history, the Islamic concept of God and society, the role of women, and finally, Islamic government and movements. The course is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, religions, or history. No prior knowledge of Islam or Islamic history is necessary.

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

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