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Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

Adi Raz

Assistant Professor Ed.D.- 2009, Jewish Theological Seminary

Clinical Assistant Professor
Adi Raz

Contact

  • Phone: 475-6644
  • Office: CAL 508
  • Office Hours: Spring 2012: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 11:00-12 Noon
  • Campus Mail Code: F9400

Biography

Adi Raz

Interests

Teaching Hebrew as a second language to students with language learning disabilities; Jewish education

HEB 601C • Intensive Hebrew I

41645 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 1.206
(also listed as HEB 381H )
show description

This course is the first semester of intensive Hebrew language instruction.

Texts

Raizen, Modern Hebrew for Beginners

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

HEB 320K • Hebrew Via Popular Culture

41660 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.204
show description

The course, which builds upon HEB 611C (or HEB 412L), focuses on acquiring proficiency and communicative skills through the use of the various outlets of popular culture: Television programs, films, newspapers, magazines, songs, and short stories.  Among other activities, students will participate in a class blog, will enter a couple of “talkback” entries, and produce an original cultural piece.  Students enrolled in the class will be expected to advance to the intermediate-high level in composition, comprehension and conversation and be prepared to meet the requirements of the Hebrew program subsequent upper-division courses.

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

HEB 381H • Intensive Hebrew I

41685 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 1.206
(also listed as HEB 601C )
show description

This course is the first semester of intensive Hebrew language instruction.

Texts

Raizen, Modern Hebrew for Beginners

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

HEB 611C • Intensive Hebrew II

42020 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 1.208
show description

Course Description

The course, which builds upon HEB 601C, emphasizes composition, comprehension and conversation in Modern Hebrew, and provides a segue to upper-division Hebrew courses such as Hebrew Grammar, Advanced Conversation and Composition, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature. Oral discourse is maintained at maximal level, and small group/individual instruction sessions supplement the regular class routine. Audio-visual materials are frequently used. Students write short papers, present topics to the class and lead class discussions. Active participation in class discussions is a decisive element in students' participation grade. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew.

Grading Policy

Participation 15%; Quizzes 30%; Homework 20% Presentations 5%; Midtem exam 10%; Final exam 20% May vary with instructor.

Texts

Information on texts will be provided by the instructor.

 

This course meets Monday through Friday. Please check the online course schedule for TTH meeting time and location.

HEB 381J • Intensv Grad Lang Instructn II

42070 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.204
show description

Course Description

The course, which builds upon HEB 601C, emphasizes composition, comprehension and conversation in Modern Hebrew, and provides a segue to upper-division Hebrew courses such as Hebrew Grammar, Advanced Conversation and Composition, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature. Oral discourse is maintained at maximal level, and small group/individual instruction sessions supplement the regular class routine. Audio-visual materials are frequently used. Students write short papers, present topics to the class and lead class discussions. Active participation in class discussions is a decisive element in students' participation grade. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew.

Grading Policy

Participation 15%; Quizzes 30%; Homework 20% Presentations 5%; Midtem exam 10%; Final exam 20% May vary with instructor.

Texts

Information on texts will be provided by the instructor.

 

This course meets Monday through Friday. Please check the online course schedule for TTH meeting time and location.

MES 341 • Cross-Cul Comm In Middle East

42487 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 2.102
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

An old woman is standing in the middle of the isle in your local supermarket. You don't see her and you bump into her. In Korea, you would apologize ten times and give her your business card, just in case she wants to contact you. In Hungary, you would apologize profusely. In Israel, you would scold her and ask why she is standing in the middle of the isle waiting for an accident to happen…What is the proper thing to do in a given culture? Why do non-native speakers visiting other cultures tend to offend the locals? These questions can all be answered by understanding the pragmatics of a culture. Pragmatics is the study of language as action and of the social contexts in which linguistic action takes place. Cross-cultural pragmatics is the study of linguistic action carried out by language users from different ethnolinguistic backgrounds.  Pragmatics is based on speech acts such as apologies and requests and their acceptable use in different cultures. In this class, we will first discuss two theoretical approaches to pragmatics: speech act theory and politeness theory. Following this introduction, we will focus on case studies from Middle Eastern countries such as Israel, Iran and Egypt. We will examine detail research on the production and interpretation of speech acts across cultures.

Texts

Gars, S. M., & Neu, J. (Eds.). (2006). Speech acts across cultures: Challenges to communication in a second language. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Scollon, R., & Scollon, S. W.

Grading

Quizzes on theoretical definitions of pragmatics. (25%); One group or individual presentation of one or more articles from the readings. (25%); Group or individual research project and presentation of findings focusing on one or more speech acts. (50%)

HEB 601C • Intensive Hebrew I

41905 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 0.120
show description

This course is the first semester of intensive Hebrew language instruction.

Texts

Raizen, Modern Hebrew for Beginners

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

MES S341 • Cross-Cul Comm In Middle East

86720 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CLA 0.120
(also listed as ANT S320L, J S S365 )
show description

An old woman is standing in the middle of the isle in your local supermarket. You don't see her and you bump into her. In Korea, you would apologize ten times and give her your business card, just in case she wants to contact you. In Hungary, you would apologize profusely. In Israel, you would scold her and ask why she is standing in the middle of the isle waiting for an accident to happen…What is the proper thing to do in a given culture? Why do non-native speakers visiting other cultures tend to offend the locals? These questions can all be answered by understanding the pragmatics of a culture. Pragmatics is the study of language as action and of the social contexts in which linguistic action takes place. Cross-cultural pragmatics is the study of linguistic action carried out by language users from different ethnolinguistic backgrounds.  Pragmatics is based on speech acts such as apologies and requests and their acceptable use in different cultures. In this class, we will first discuss two theoretical approaches to pragmatics: speech act theory and politeness theory. Following this introduction, we will focus on case studies from Middle Eastern countries such as Israel, Iran and Egypt. We will examine detail research on the production and interpretation of speech acts across cultures.

Texts

Gars, S. M., & Neu, J. (Eds.). (2006). Speech acts across cultures: Challenges to communication in a second language. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Scollon, R., & Scollon, S. W.

Grading

Quizzes on theoretical definitions of pragmatics. (25%); One group or individual presentation of one or more articles from the readings. (25%); Group or individual research project and presentation of findings focusing on one or more speech acts. (50%)

HEB 611C • Intensive Hebrew II

41510 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 1.206
(also listed as HEB 381J )
show description

The course, which builds upon HEB 601C, emphasizes composition, comprehension and conversation in Modern Hebrew, and provides a segue to upper-division Hebrew courses such as Hebrew Grammar, Advanced Conversation and Composition, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature. Oral discourse is maintained at maximal level, and small group/individual instruction sessions supplement the regular class routine. Audio-visual materials are frequently used. Students write short papers, present topics to the class and lead class discussions. Active participation in class discussions is a decisive element in students' participation grade. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew.

Grading Policy

Participation 15%; Quizzes 30%; Homework 20% Presentations 5%; Midtem exam 10%; Final exam 20% May vary with instructor.

Texts

Information on texts will be provided by the instructor.

 

This course meets Monday through Friday. Please check the online course schedule for TTH meeting time and location.

HEB 320L • Hebrew Through The Media

41520 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 1.206
show description

This course will focus on learning Hebrew with the use of Israeli media such as talk shows, TV pieces, national and international new, popular radio shows, and written media. In this course we will discuss how Israelis see the world from their point of view and understand Israeli culture by exposing the different layers of Israeli society represented in the local media. Students will learn the fast paced Israeli society using media and will have exposure to the intensity and frequency of topic changes in the press. We will focus on everything from politics to cultural events and celebrities in Israel. The course will require general knowledge of Israeli popular culture.  Prerequisites: HEB 346 (Topic 7: Hebrew via Popular Culture). Conducted in Hebrew.

Texts

No texts required. Instructor will provide authentic materials in Israeli media. 

Grading & Requirements

Attendance and participation: 30%

Class presentations: 20%

Homework assignments: 15%

Opinion papers: 35%

HEB 381J • Intensive Hebrew II

41570 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 1.206
(also listed as HEB 611C )
show description

The course, which builds upon HEB 601C, emphasizes composition, comprehension and conversation in Modern Hebrew, and provides a segue to upper-division Hebrew courses such as Hebrew Grammar, Advanced Conversation and Composition, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature. Oral discourse is maintained at maximal level, and small group/individual instruction sessions supplement the regular class routine. Audio-visual materials are frequently used. Students write short papers, present topics to the class and lead class discussions. Active participation in class discussions is a decisive element in students' participation grade. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew.

Grading Policy

Participation 15%; Quizzes 30%; Homework 20% Presentations 5%; Midtem exam 10%; Final exam 20% May vary with instructor.

Texts

Information on texts will be provided by the instructor.

 

This course meets Monday through Friday. Please check the online course schedule for TTH meeting time and location.

HEB 601C • Intensive Hebrew I

41300 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 1.212
show description

This course is the first semester of intensive Hebrew language instruction.

Texts

Raizen, Modern Hebrew for Beginners

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

HEB 320K • Hebrew Via Popular Culture

41310 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 1.118
show description

The course, which builds upon HEB 611C (or HEB 412L), focuses on acquiring proficiency and communicative skills through the use of the various outlets of popular culture: Television programs, films, newspapers, magazines, songs, and short stories.  Among other activities, students will participate in a class blog, will enter a couple of “talkback” entries, and produce an original cultural piece.  Students enrolled in the class will be expected to advance to the intermediate-high level in composition, comprehension and conversation and be prepared to meet the requirements of the Hebrew program subsequent upper-division courses.

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

HEB S372 • Minorities In Israel

86733 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm MEZ 2.122
(also listed as J S S365, MES S322K )
show description

Israel is a diverse country with just over seven million citizens. The people of Israel wear keffiyahs, wigs, veils, and kippot. Most of the population in Israel is Jewish however, many are surprised to hear that there are numerous non-Jewish minorities that include Muslims, Christians and Druze. Since Israel is an immigrant nation, there are also Jewish minorities such as Ethiopians and Russians that came to Israel looking for a better life. In this course we will look at the many facets of Israeli society and focus on the minorities that live in Israel. We will discuss the issues that these minorities encounter in a country facing social, political, and security difficulties.

 

TEXTS/READINGS

Rosenthal D. (2008). The Israelis. Free Press, New York

 

GRADING POLICY

Quizzes  25%

One group or individual presentation of one or more articles from the readings.  25%

Attendance and class participation  15%

Group or individual research project and presentation of findings  35%

MES S322K • Minorities In Israel

86935 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm MEZ 2.122
(also listed as HEB S372, J S S365 )
show description

Israel is a diverse country with just over seven million citizens. The people of Israel wear keffiyahs, wigs, veils, and kippot. Most of the population in Israel is Jewish however, many are surprised to hear that there are numerous non-Jewish minorities that include Muslims, Christians and Druze. Since Israel is an immigrant nation, there are also Jewish minorities such as Ethiopians and Russians that came to Israel looking for a better life. In this course we will look at the many facets of Israeli society and focus on the minorities that live in Israel. We will discuss the issues that these minorities encounter in a country facing social, political, and security difficulties.

 

TEXTS/READINGS

Rosenthal D. (2008). The Israelis. Free Press, New York

 

GRADING POLICY

Quizzes  25%

One group or individual presentation of one or more articles from the readings.  25%

Attendance and class participation  15%

Group or individual research project and presentation of findings  35%

HEB 611C • Intensive Hebrew II

41360 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 1.206
show description

Course Description

The course, which builds upon HEB 601C, emphasizes composition, comprehension and conversation in Modern Hebrew, and provides a segue to upper-division Hebrew courses such as Hebrew Grammar, Advanced Conversation and Composition, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature. Oral discourse is maintained at maximal level, and small group/individual instruction sessions supplement the regular class routine. Audio-visual materials are frequently used. Students write short papers, present topics to the class and lead class discussions. Active participation in class discussions is a decisive element in students' participation grade. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew.

Grading Policy

Participation 15%; Quizzes 30%; Homework 20% Presentations 5%; Midtem exam 10%; Final exam 20% May vary with instructor.

Texts

Information on texts will be provided by the instructor.

 

This course meets Monday through Friday. Please check the online course schedule for TTH meeting time and location.

HEB 346 • Hebrew Through The Media

41375 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 1.206
show description

Course Description

This course will focus on learning Hebrew with the use of Israeli media such as talk shows, TV pieces, national and international new, popular radio shows, and written media. In this course we will discuss how Israelis see the world from their point of view and understand Israeli culture by exposing the different layers of Israeli society represented in the local media. Students will learn the fast paced Israeli society using media and will have exposure to the intensity and frequency of topic changes in the press. We will focus on everything from politics to cultural events and celebrities in Israel. The course will require general knowledge of Israeli popular culture.  Prerequisites: HEB 346 (Topic 7: Hebrew via Popular Culture). Conducted in Hebrew.

 

Texts

No texts required. Instructor will provide authentic materials in Israeli media. 

 

Grading & Requirements

Attendance and participation: 30%

Class presentations: 20%

Homework assignments: 15%

Opinion papers: 35%

HEB 381J • Intensv Grad Lang Instructn II

41420 • Spring 2012
Meets
show description

Course Description

The course, which builds upon HEB 601C, emphasizes composition, comprehension and conversation in Modern Hebrew, and provides a segue to upper-division Hebrew courses such as Hebrew Grammar, Advanced Conversation and Composition, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature. Oral discourse is maintained at maximal level, and small group/individual instruction sessions supplement the regular class routine. Audio-visual materials are frequently used. Students write short papers, present topics to the class and lead class discussions. Active participation in class discussions is a decisive element in students' participation grade. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew.

Grading Policy

Participation 15%; Quizzes 30%; Homework 20% Presentations 5%; Midtem exam 10%; Final exam 20% May vary with instructor.

Texts

Information on texts will be provided by the instructor.

 

This course meets Monday through Friday. Please check the online course schedule for TTH meeting time and location.

HEB 601C • Intensive Hebrew I

41270 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 1.212
show description

This course is the first semester of intensive Hebrew language instruction.

 

Texts

Raizen, Modern Hebrew for Beginners

 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

HEB 346 • Hebrew Via Popular Culture

41285 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.216
show description

The course, which builds upon HEB 611C (or HEB 412L), focuses on acquiring proficiency and communicative skills through the use of the various outlets of popular culture: Television programs, films, newspapers, magazines, songs, and short stories.  Among other activities, students will participate in a class blog, will enter a couple of “talkback” entries, and produce an original cultural piece.  Students enrolled in the class will be expected to advance to the intermediate-high level in composition, comprehension and conversation and be prepared to meet the requirements of the Hebrew program subsequent upper-division courses.

 

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

MES S322K • Cross-Cul Comm In Middle East

86965 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm MEZ 2.122
(also listed as ANT S320L, WGS S340 )
show description

An old woman is standing in the middle of the isle in your local supermarket. You don’t see her and you bump into her. In Korea, you would apologize ten times and give her your business card, just in case she wants to contact you. In Hungary, you would apologize profusely. In Israel, you would scold her and ask why she is standing in the middle of the isle waiting for an accident to happen…What is the proper thing to do in a given culture? Why do non-native speakers visiting other cultures tend to offend the locals? These questions can all be answered by understanding the pragmatics of a culture. Pragmatics is the study of language as action and of the social contexts in which linguistic action takes place. Cross-cultural pragmatics is the study of linguistic action carried out by language users from different ethnolinguistic backgrounds.  Pragmatics is based on speech acts such as apologies and requests and their acceptable use in different cultures. In this class, we will first discuss two theoretical approaches to pragmatics: speech act theory and politeness theory. Following this introduction, we will focus on case studies from Middle Eastern countries such as Israel, Turkey and Jordan. We will examine detailed research on the production and interpretation of speech acts across cultures.

HEB 611C • Intensive Hebrew II

41735 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 1.206
show description

Course Description

The course, which builds upon HEB 601C, emphasizes composition, comprehension and conversation in Modern Hebrew, and provides a segue to upper-division Hebrew courses such as Hebrew Grammar, Advanced Conversation and Composition, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature. Oral discourse is maintained at maximal level, and small group/individual instruction sessions supplement the regular class routine. Audio-visual materials are frequently used. Students write short papers, present topics to the class and lead class discussions. Active participation in class discussions is a decisive element in students' participation grade. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew.

Grading Policy

Participation 15%; Quizzes 30%; Homework 20% Presentations 5%; Midtem exam 10%; Final exam 20% May vary with instructor.

Texts

Information on texts will be provided by the instructor.

 

This course meets Monday through Friday. Please check the online course schedule for TTH meeting time and location.

HEB 346 • Hebrew Via Popular Culture

41745 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 2.118
show description

The course, which builds upon HEB 611C (or HEB 412L), focuses on acquiring proficiency and communicative skills through the use of the various outlets of popular culture: Television programs, films, newspapers, magazines, songs, and short stories.  Among other activities, students will participate in a class blog, will enter a couple of “talkback” entries, and produce an original cultural piece.  Students enrolled in the class will be expected to advance to the intermediate-high level in composition, comprehension and conversation and be prepared to meet the requirements of the Hebrew program subsequent upper-division courses.

 

Texts:

Materials to be posted on Blackboard. Youtube videos and other internet resources.

 

Grading:

Attendance and participation  20%Homework assignments  15%Weekly papers  20%; Portfolio  15%Class blog  15%;  Original piece  15%

HEB 611C • Intensive Hebrew II

41338 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.206
show description

Course Description

The course, which builds upon HEB 601C, emphasizes composition, comprehension and conversation in Modern Hebrew, and provides a segue to upper-division Hebrew courses such as Hebrew Grammar, Advanced Conversation and Composition, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature. Oral discourse is maintained at maximal level, and small group/individual instruction sessions supplement the regular class routine. Audio-visual materials are frequently used. Students write short papers, present topics to the class and lead class discussions. Active participation in class discussions is a decisive element in students' participation grade. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew.

Grading Policy

Participation 15%; Quizzes 30%; Homework 20% Presentations 5%; Midtem exam 10%; Final exam 20% May vary with instructor.

Texts

Information on texts will be provided by the instructor.

 

This course meets Monday through Friday. Please check the online course schedule for TTH meeting time and location.

HEB 325 • Advanced Conv And Composition

41345 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 2.118
show description

Targeting the speaking and writing skills, this course focuses on solidifying the intermediate-mid level of proficiency in both skills and bringing most students to the intermediate-high level of proficiency or above.  Successful students will express themselves effectively and gain the confidence necessary for comfortable interactions in Hebrew.   The texts used will provide an introduction to Hebrew literature and culture and Jewish history as well as to modern Israel, and the course will serve as a bridge between our intensive language courses and more advanced content courses.  The class will be conducted entirely in Hebrew. Additional description will be provided by the instructor.

 

Texts:

-A variety of articles from Israeli daily newspapers.

-Raizen, Esther omanut havikuach (available on Blackboard)

-A collection of short stories and poems (available on Blackboard)

 

Grading:

Class participation  30%

Individual homework  20%

Group work  20%

Final portfolio  30%

 

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