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Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

Benjamin Claude Brower

Assistant Professor Ph.D., 2005, Cornell University

ISL 372 • French Empire: The West/Islam

41785 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 3.124
(also listed as HIS 364G, R S 358 )
show description

Modern French imperialism advanced its claims to global power through a division of the world into a two parts. On one hand was a space of civilization and modernity and, on the other, there was a primitive space inhabited by people who needed to be liberated or dominated. In the Mediterranean world this thinking erected a frontier running across the middle of the sea. In the north there was the “West” or “Europe,” and in the south there was the “East” or “Islam.” The West, represented by France, was construed as the conveyor of modern values and progress, while the East was a place of archaism and reaction that needed to be renewed, by force if necessary. French thinkers called this the “civilizing mission,” and it justified France’s colonization of Muslim countries in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Many parts of this thinking have survived the colonial era and mark attitudes in contemporary, post-colonial France. Religion is generally offered as the decisive category determining these divisions, with the Muslim societies of Africa and the Middle East set off as somehow essentially different and incompatible with France and its Christian or secular traditions.

Paying special attention to the religious and secular dimensions of the problem, our work in this course will critically consider how these cultural and political frontiers developed, and their use in contests for power. The focus will be on modern France and the Middle Eastern countries that fell under French rule in the 19th and 20th centuries, particularly Algeria, but the course will examine these questions within a broader trans-national context across several historical periods.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Students will learn the skills of historical analysis and interpretation, along with the empirical material associated with the course itself. This will include the ability to grasp the complexity of historical debates and rethink received understandings and concepts in light of new evidence. Coursework and evaluations will focus on students’ ability to articulate coherent and sustained arguments in writing and verbally. There are no pre-requisites beyond those generally associated with a course of this level.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

You will need to purchase the following books or use reserve copies in library.

  • Kateb Yacine, Nedjma (University of Virginia Press, 2001). ISBN-13: 978-0813913131
  • Anonymous, The Song of Roland (Penguin, 1990) ISBN-13: 978-0140445329
  • Abdellah Hammoudi, A Season in Mecca: Narrative of a Pilgrimage (Hill and Wang, 2006) ISBN-13:978-0809076093
  • Edward Said, Orientalism (Vintage, 1979) ISBN: 039474067X
  • Joan W. Scott, The Politics of the Veil (Princeton UP, 2007) ISBN: 0691125430
  • Lucette Valensi, The Birth of the Despot, Venice and the Sublime Port (Cornell UP, 2009) ISBN:0801475430

Additional required readings, as noted in schedule of class meetings, will be distributed electronically or placed on library reserve.

Other: Required material in the course also includes music, photographs, films and various visual texts such as music videos that will be played/projected in class.

 

GRADES:Midterm            25%

Final Exam            35%

Writing            25%

Participation            15%

MES 343 • Writing Violence In History

42175 • Fall 2014
Meets M 400pm-700pm GAR 0.120
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

Violence has been a constant feature of history yet it is a topic that historians have had trouble understanding and explaining.  Endemic and problematic, violence is also ever changing and many hued, making its study especially difficult. This seminar will focus on the skills necessary for the historian working on violent phenomena.  We shall examine how historians themselves have approached episodes of violence, but we will also look outside of the discipline of history to see how psychoanalysts, anthropologists, novelists, and activists have both understood violence and how they represent it in their work. This is a research and writing course.  This means that students will be required to develop experience working in historical sources and, in particular, demonstrate mastery of advanced writing skills.

Texts:

•          Alain Corbin, Village of Cannibals (Harvard University Press: 2006). ISBN 0674939018.

•          Sven Lindqvist, A History of Bombing (New Press, 2003).  ISBN 1565848160.

•          Toni Morrison, Beloved (Vintage, 2004). ISBN 1400033411.

•          Enzo Traverso, The Origins of Nazi Violence (New Press, 2003). ISBN 1565847881.

•          Simone Weil and Rachel Bespaloff, War and the Iliad (NYRB Classics, 2005). ISBN 1590171454.

•          Georges Vigarello, A History of Rape: Sexual Violence in France from the 16th to the 20th Century (Polity Press, 2001), ISBN: 0745621708

Grading:

Short Papers:          30% (15% each)                

Final Essay                50%

Presentation             10%

Participation             10%

MES 385 • Trauma And History

42630 • Spring 2014
Meets F 1200pm-300pm GAR 2.124
(also listed as HIS 381 )
show description

The goal of this seminar is to rethink the place of trauma within history and historiography as part of the Institute for Historical Study’s theme, “Trauma and Social Transformation.” My fundamental premise is that psychoanalysis and historiography share a productive relationship, despite having different, even incommensurable epistemological points of departure.  In particular, psychoanalysis offers a unique perspective to interrogate questions of key importance to historians such as authority, difference, temporality, method and sources, all questions that open towards analytically rich, self-interrogative historiographical practices.  Trauma is field of study were this relationship can unfold.  By trauma I mean a fundamental crisis in the symbolic field, such as the reduction to silence in the wake of a violence that seems beyond representation or understanding.  Such epistemological crises can be transformative historical experiences for individuals and societies, and they can lead to a variety of social and political outcomes, such as apathy, messianism, war, social displacement, and political mobilization.  Trauma can also be instrumentalized in strategies of political hegemony, or it can transmute into moral categories such as the victim. For historians, writing trauma requires an awareness of the complex responses traumatic subjects can provoke and maintaining a balance between protective numbing and full identification with victims. It also requires attention to language and readiness to engage absences, ambivalence, and ambiguity in our sources rather than strive for the goals of full intelligibility or narrative closure.  The seminar will begin with a selection of texts engaging theoretical issues and the Holocaust, and it will finish with readings on trauma and memory in non-European contexts.

 Readings (tentative):

You will need to purchase the following books or use the library’s copies on reserve. Other assigned readings will be distributed electronically.

1.     Saul Friedlander, Probing the Limits of Representation: Nazism and the Final Solution

2.     Freud, "Beyond the Pleasure Principle" and others.

3.     Cathy Caruth, Unclaimed Experience: Trauma, Narrative, and History (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996).

4.     Ruth Leys, Trauma: A Genealogy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000)

5.     Dominick LaCapra, Representing the Holocaust: History, Theory, Trauma (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994)

6.     Didier Fassin and Richard Rechtman, The Empire of Trauma: An Inquiry into the Condition of Victimhood (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009).

8.     Michael Rothberg, Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization (Stanford UP)

9.     Heonik Kwon, After the Massacre: Commemoration and Consolation in Ha My and My Lai

10.  Toni Morison, Beloved

11.  Drew Gilpin Faust, This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War

12.  Ahmad H. Sa’di and Lila Abu-Lughod, Nakba: Palestine, 1948, and the Claims of Memory (Columbia Univeristy Press, 2007. Yoav Di-Capua, “The Traumatic Subjectivity of Sụ nʿ Allāh Ibrāhīm’s Dhāt”

13.  Shahid Amin, Event, Metaphor, Memory: Chauri Chaura, 1922-1992 (University of California Press, 1995)

14.  Virginia Garrand-Burnett, Terror in the Land of the Holy Spirit: Guatemala under General Efrain Rios Montt, 1982-1983 (Oxford UP, 2010)

15.  Federico Finchelstein, The Ideological Origins of the Dirty War: Fascism, Populism and Dictatorship in Twentieth Century Argentina (Oxford UP, 2014)

 Grading:

·      History of a Class Session:  20%

·      Class Participation and Presentation:  30%

·      Final Essay:  50% 

Plus/Minus grading will be used for all grading in this course.  The grade scale is as follows:

100-93% = A; 92-90% = A- ; 89-87% = B+ ; 86-83% = B ; 82-80% = B- ; 79-77% = C+ ; 76-73% = C ; 72-70% = C- ; 69-67% = D+ ; 66-63% = D ; 62-60% = D- ; below 60% = F.

MES 385 • Transnational Mediterranean

41795 • Fall 2012
Meets W 300pm-600pm WAG 112
(also listed as HIS 381 )
show description

The fundamental task of this seminar is to examine the boundaries and frontiers that shape how scholars of the Middle East and Europe conduct their work. The area studies paradigm, common to Anglo-American scholarship, relies upon lines drawn across space, lines that come to us as fixed and unalterable, and they purport to reflect geographic, socio-economic, cultural, and political realities. They are thus taken for granted by most scholars. But boundaries and frontiers demand careful historicization, as well as sustained epistemological critique. Seemingly universal, inevitable, and necessary, they are in fact often contingent are always the result of history and politics. This seminar will engage texts that open a space in which these divisions can be rethought. In particular it will seek works that examine those historical movements that have transgressed or overflowed the boundaries by which an area of the world roughly centered on the Mediterranean Sea has been partitioned.

ISL 372 • French Empire: The West/Islam

41450 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 420
(also listed as HIS 364G, R S 358 )
show description

The great historian of the Mediterranean Sea, Fernand Braudel, wrote that people here “live and breathe with the same rhythms,” meaning that Mediterranean societies have a shared destiny. Today, however, it is common to divide this region into northern and southern halves, variously called the West and East, or Europe and Islam. Our work in this course will critically consider the development of these categories, and their use in history down to the present. The focus will be on the role of modern France and France’s Mediterranean empire, but we shall examine other cases and contexts as well.

 

You will need to purchase the following books or use reserve copies in library.

Mouloud Feraoun, The Poor Man's Son: Menrad, Kabyle Schoolteacher (University of Virginia Press, 2005).  ISBN: 0813923263.

‘Abd al-Rahman al-Jabarti, Napoleon In Egypt: Al-Jabarti's Chronicle Of The French Occupation, 1798. (Markus Wiener Publishers, 1993) ISBN: 1558763376.

Susan G. Miller, Disorienting Encounters: Travels of a Moroccan Scholar in France. (ISBN: 0520074629)

Edward Said, Orientalism (Vintage, 1979) ISBN: 039474067X

Joan W. Scott, The Politics of the Veil (Princeton UP, 2007).  ISBN: 0691125430

John V. Tolan, Saracens: Islam in the Medieval European Imagination (Columbia UP, 2002). ISBN: 0231123337.

Lucette Valensi, The Birth of the Despot, Venice and the Sublime Port. (Cornell UP, 2009) ISBN: 0801475430.

Required material in the course also includes music, photographs, films and various visual texts such as music videos that will be played/projected in class.

 

Grades:

Midterm   25%                       

Final Exam  35%

Writing    25%

Participation  15%

 

Grade Scale: 90 – 100% = A; 80 – 89% =B; 70 – 79% = C; 69 – 60% = D; below 60% = F.

MES 323K • Introduction To Modern Algeria

42140 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 2.128
(also listed as HIS 364G )
show description

This course presents the major themes of Algerian history from the sixteenth century to today. This story begins in 1516 and the Ottoman period, when formidable fleets of Algerian corsairs struggled with Spanish, French, and even American ships in the “jihad al-bahr” (jihad at sea). The course ends after a grueling but brilliantly won war of national liberation against colonial France (1954-62) became a revolution betrayed, when Algeria entered a period of terrorism in the 1990s. Algeria’s history intersects several fields of study (European, African, and Middle Eastern studies) and it is a country that has been home to Muslims, Christians, and Jews, speaking many different languages. The course seeks to give expression to these multi-religious and multi-linguistic traditions. Therefore, students should be ready to cross methodological and cultural borders.

Students will learn the skills of historical analysis and interpretation, along with the material described above. This will include the ability to grasp the complexity of historical debates and rethink received knowledge and concepts in light of new evidence.  Coursework and evaluations will focus on students’ ability to articulate coherent and sustained arguments in writing and verbally.  There are no pre-requisites beyond those generally associated with a course of this level.

Texts

You will need to purchase the following books or use reserve copies in library.

 

 

  •   Henri Alleg, The Question (Bison Books, 2006), ISBN: 0803259603
  •   Assia Djebar, Algerian White (Seven Stories Press, 2003) ISBN: 1583225161.
  •   Mouloud Feraoun, The Poor Man's Son: Menrad, Kabyle Schoolteacher (University of Virginia Press, 2005).  ISBN: 0813923263
  •   Rachid Mimouni, The Honor of the Tribe: A Novel (William Morrow, 1992) 0688097464
  •   John Ruedy, Modern Algeria: The Origins and Development of a Nation (Indiana University Press, 2005) ISBN: 0253217822
  •  Additional required readings noted in schedule of class meetings will be distributed electronically or placed on library reserve. 
  •  Other: Required material in the course also includes music, photographs, films and various visual texts such as music videos.

Grading

 

Midterm                        25%                       

Final Exam                        35%

Writing                        25%

Participation                        15%

MES 381 • Violence And Colonialism

42239 • Spring 2011
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 380L )
show description

This seminar will rethink the problem of understanding violence in the colonial situation. Much

recent historiography charts new ways to think about how colonial power is produced and

contested through things like architecture, sexuality, statistics, boundaries, definitions, manners,

law, and citizenship, along with all the various configurations that make up a colonial episteme.

It is here, the argument goes, that colonial power--subtle, sophisticated, and generally insidious--

is produced and not out of the end of the gun. The question of violence in its physical

dimensions, such as the body in pain, generally recedes from view in these studies. Thus

although colonial historians today still write under the shadow of Franz Fanon, they have very

little to say about the relationship of violence to political power. As a result, the violence of

colonialism is displaced as somehow not as worthy a subject as these “other spaces of

domination.” Our work in this course will seek ways that colonial historians might reconnect

with the question of violence.

Texts

You will need to purchase the following books or use the library’s copies. Other assigned

readings will be distributed electronically.

1. Shahid Amin, Event, Metaphor, Memory: Chauri Chaura, 1922-1992 (Univ. of

California Press, 1995) ISBN-13: 978-0520087804

2. Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism (Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1973)

ISBN-13: 978-0156701532

3. Etienne Balibar, Race, Nation, Class (Verso, 1991) ISBN-13: 978-0860915423

4. Benjamin Brower, A Desert Named Peace: The Violence of France's Empire in the

Algerian Sahara, 1844-1902 (Columbia UP, 2009) ISBN-13: 978-0231154925

5. Mike Davis, Late Victorian Holocausts: El Niño Famines and the Making of the Third

World

6. Franz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth (Grove Press, 2005) ISBN-13: 978-0802141323

7. Michel Foucault, “Society Must Be Defended”: Lectures at the College de France, 1975-

1976 (Picador, 2003) ISBN-13: 978-0312422660

8. Isabel Hull, Absolute Destruction: Military Culture and the Practices of War in Imperial

Germany (Cornell UP, 2006) ISBN-13: 978-0801472930

9. Priya Satia, Spies in Arabia: The Great War and the Cultural Foundations of Britain's

Covert Empire in the Middle East (Oxford UP, 2009) ISBN-13: 978-0199734801

10. Carl Schmitt, The Nomos of the Earth in the International Law of the Jus Publicum

Europaeum (Telos Press, 2006) ISBN-13: 978-0914386308.

Assignments:

Short response papers: These papers will you help work through the issues of the readings and

yield useful references. You are asked to summarize each week’s reading(s) and develop a brief

critical analysis of the author’s argument, evidence, and methodology. Length: 2 pp., doublespaced,

12 pnt. font. Proofread carefully: correct use of language is expected and will figure in

grading. Due date: These papers are due before each class at 8:00am. You may submit them

electronically in an email attachment.

Final Review Essay: Each student will prepare a final review essay of 10 pages. You will select

a total of 3 books (1-2 one from the course and 1-2 related outside books) on a related theme and

write a review essay. Due date: Last class meeting.

Grading:

Final Paper 40%

Short response papers 35%

Participation 25%

Plus/Minus grading will be used for all grading in this course. The grade scale is as follows:

100-93% = A; 92-90% = A- ; 89-87% = B+ ; 86-83% = B ; 82-80% = B- ; 79-77% = C+ ;

76-73% = C ; 72-70% = C- ; 69-67% = D+ ; 66-63% = D ; 62-60% = D- ; below 60% = F.

ISL 372 • French Empire: The West/Islam

41510 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 420
(also listed as HIS 364G )
show description

French Empire: The “West” and “Islam.”
HIS 364G- 9460/ISL 372- 41510
Fall 2010

Instructor: Benjamin C. Brower                                                 Telephone: 512-475-6813
Office
: Garrison 0.116                                                             Email: benbrower@mail.utexas.edu
Office Hours
: M 10:15-11:45; W 3:00-4:00,                        Class Meeting Times: MWF 1:00-2:00pm
and by appointment                                                                        Meeting Place: WAG 420

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Modern French imperialism advanced its claims to global power through a division of the world into a two parts. On one hand was a space of civilization and modernity and, on the other, there was a primitive space inhabited by people who needed to be liberated or dominated. In the Mediterranean world this thinking erected a frontier running across the middle of the sea. In the north there was the “West” or “Europe,” and in the south there was the “East” or “Islam.” The West, represented by France, was construed as the conveyor of modern values and progress, while the East was a place of archaism and reaction that needed to be renewed, by force if necessary. French thinkers called this the “civilizing mission,” and it justified France’s colonization of Muslim countries in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Many parts of this thinking have survived the colonial era and mark attitudes in contemporary, post-colonial France. Religion is generally offered as the decisive category determining these divisions, with the Muslim societies of Africa and the Middle East set off as somehow essentially different and incompatible with France and its Christian or secular traditions.

Paying special attention to the religious and secular dimensions of the problem, our work in this course will critically consider how these cultural and political frontiers developed, and their use in contests for power. The focus will be on modern France and the Middle Eastern countries that fell under French rule in the 19th and 20th centuries, particularly Algeria, but the course will examine these questions within a broader trans-national context across several historical periods.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Students will learn the skills of historical analysis and interpretation, along with the empirical material associated with the course itself. This will include the ability to grasp the complexity of historical debates and rethink received understandings and concepts in light of new evidence. Coursework and evaluations will focus on students’ ability to articulate coherent and sustained arguments in writing and verbally. There are no pre-requisites beyond those generally associated with a course of this level.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

You will need to purchase the following books or use reserve copies in library.

  • Kateb Yacine, Nedjma (University of Virginia Press, 2001). ISBN-13: 978-0813913131
  • Anonymous, The Song of Roland (Penguin, 1990) ISBN-13: 978-0140445329
  • Abdellah Hammoudi, A Season in Mecca: Narrative of a Pilgrimage (Hill and Wang, 2006) ISBN-13:978-0809076093
  • Edward Said, Orientalism (Vintage, 1979) ISBN: 039474067X
  • Joan W. Scott, The Politics of the Veil (Princeton UP, 2007) ISBN: 0691125430
  • Lucette Valensi, The Birth of the Despot, Venice and the Sublime Port (Cornell UP, 2009) ISBN:0801475430

Additional required readings, as noted in schedule of class meetings, will be distributed electronically or placed on library reserve.

Other: Required material in the course also includes music, photographs, films and various visual texts such as music videos that will be played/projected in class.

COURSE RULES:

  • Laptops are to be used only for taking notes. Students are expected to disable the Internet accessibility function of all electronic devises used in class. Thus there will be no use of email, web browsers, or other software that accesses the Internet during our meetings. If you would like the record the lectures, please see me first.
  • Cell phone use of any sort, including text messages, will not be tolerated.

ASSIGNMENTS:

  • •Exams: There will be one midterm and a comprehensive final exam. Both exams will consist of analytical ID’s and essays. A list of potential ID’s and questions will be available to help prepare for the exams. You will be expected to respond with material from the readings and lectures. SEE BELOW FOR EXAM DATES.

Writing Assignment: You will prepare a historiographical essay. This will be an analysis of debates concerning Edward Said’s book Orientalism. The essay will deal with Said’s argument and evidence in the book itself and critically evaluate three outside reviews of it. Your task is to work through the significant controversies concerning Orientalism and examine the role of interpretation in the production of historical knowledge. More details will be given in class (7pp. minimum. DUE DATE: Monday, November 16).

Discussion Questions: Much of our course work will center on readings and discussions (about one each week). You are required to prepare in advance a question for our discussion. These will be typed and turned in. During discussions, each student will pose their question.

GRADES:
Midterm            25%
Final Exam            35%
Writing            25%
Participation            15%

Plus/Minus grading will be used for all grading in this course. The grade scale is as follows: 100-93% = A; 92-90% = A- ; 89-87% = B+ ; 86-83% = B ; 82-80% = B- ; 79-77% = C+ ; 76-73% = C ; 72-70% = C- ; 69-67% = D+ ; 66-63% = D ; 62-60% = D- ; below 60% = F.

ATTENDANCE:

  • Attendance, preparation, and active participation in all course sessions are mandatory.
  • Please familiarize yourself with the University’s policy concerning excused absences. Unexcused absences will impinge upon your final grade: 2 unexcused absences will result in the loss of 1 full letter grade; more than 4 will result in loss of 2 full letter grades.
  • Religious Holy Days: By University policy, please notify me of your pending absence fourteen days prior to the anticipated date of observance of religious holy days. If you must miss a class, an examination, or an assignment, for religious observance, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS HONOR CODE:

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

All work for this course will be that of the student and original contributions. Writing done for a previous course cannot be used to fulfill assignments in this course. I militantly pursue cases of suspected plagiarism and cheating.

*** Late assignments are penalized, plagiarism is prosecuted***

DISABILITIES:
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE OF CLASS MEETINGS, Fall 2010
(Subject to Revisions and Changes)

WEEK ONE: August 25 & 27
            Wednesday: Introduction
            Friday: The Question of Borders

WEEK TWO: August 30-Sept. 3
The Early Example of Muslims in Europe
            Monday, Concepts: “Europe” and “Islam”
            Wednesday, The “Covivencia” in Medieval Spain Debate
            Friday, Minorities and the Reconquista

WEEK THREE: September 6-10
The Question of Civilizations
            Monday, No Class, Labor Day Holiday
            Wednesday, The Crusades
            Friday, Discussion: Huntington, “The Clash of Civilizations?”

WEEK FOUR: September 13-17
Les Croisades”or “al-urūb al-alībiyya”: The Crusades and their Memory
            Monday, The “Saracen”
            Wednesday, Discussion: The Song of Rolland (IN FULL)
            Friday, The Crusader Renaissance in the Nineteenth Century

WEEK FIVE: September 20-24
Early Modern Mediterranean Encounters
            Monday, Europe and the Ottoman Empire, pt. 1
            Wednesday, Europe and the Ottoman Empire, pt.
            Friday, Discussion: Lucette Valensi, The Birth of the Despot (IN FULL)

WEEK SIX: September 27-Oct. 1
European Imperialism
            Monday, Bonaparte in Egypt pt. 1
            Wednesday, Bonaparte in Egypt pt. 2: Slides, The Description of Egypt
            Friday, Discussion: al-Jabarti, Napoleon In Egypt (selections)

WEEK SEVEN: October 4-8
The Colonial Experience in Algeria
            Monday, Algeria, 1830–1962
            Wednesday, Discussion: Kateb Yacine, Nedjma pt. 1
            Friday, Discussion: Kateb Yacine, Nedjma pt. 2

WEEK EIGHT: October 11-15
Republican France and Muslim Reformers
           Monday, Discussion: The Renan and al-Afghani debate, 1883
            Wednesday, Marianne and the Prophet
            Friday, The Islamic Reform Movement and the Republic

WEEK NINE: October 18-22
Monday, Review
            Wednesday, ***MID TERM EXAM***
            Friday, How to Read Orientalism, Theory and Method

WEEK TEN: October 25-29
Representations and Power
            Monday, European Orientalism in Image and Text
            Wednesday, Discussion: Said, Orientalism pt. 1 (pp. xv.-110)
            Friday, Discussion: Said, Orientalism, pt. 2 (pp. 284-352)

WEEK ELEVEN: November 1-5
Globalized Islam
            Monday, Muslim Pilgrimage to Mecca and the Holy Places
            Wednesday, Discussion: Abdellah Hammoudi, A Season in Mecca (Chpt. 1 pp. 3-8; Chpts. 2-6 in full;and Chpt
9 in full. Total ca. 150pp.)
            Friday, Immigration and Islam in France

 

WEEK TWELVE: November 8-12
The Post-Colonial Era: Muslims in France, France and its Muslims
Monday, A New World Order?: Post-Cold War Society and Racism
Wednesday, Discussion: Abdelmalek Sayad, The Suffering of the Immigrant (selections)
Friday, Music Videos: Dahmane El Harrachi, “Ya Rayah” (ca. 1975) & 113, “Princes de la ville”
(2000) “Banlieu” (2005)

WEEK THIRTEEN: November 15-19
Assimilation, Integration and the Right to be Different
            Monday, French Secularism pt. 1
                ***Orientalism Papers Due, Monday, November 15***

            Wednesday, French Secularism pt. 2
            Friday, Film: “La Haine” (1995), pt. 1

 WEEK FOURTEEN: November 22-26
            Monday, Discussion: Joan W. Scott, The Politics of the Veil (IN FULL)
            Wednesday, Film: “La Haine” (1995), pt. 2
            Friday: Thanksgiving Holiday

WEEK FIFTEEN: November 29-Dec. 3
New Citizens in Old Europe
            Monday, Review
            Wednesday, Discussion: E. Balibar, We, the People of Europe?: Reflections on Transnational Citizenship (selections)
            Friday, Conclusion

***FINAL EXAM: Tuesday, December 14, 9:00-12:00 noon***

MES 323K • Introduction To Modern Algeria

42247 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 900-1000 PAR 1
(also listed as HIS 364G )
show description

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ALGERIA

HIS 364G- 39813/ MES 323K- 42247

                  Spring 2010

Instructor: Benjamin C. Brower

Office: Garrison 0.116

Office Hours: M 10:15-11:45; W 3:00-4:00, and by appointment

Telephone: 512-475-6994

Email: benbrower@mail.utexas.edu

Class Meeting Times: MWF 9:00-10:00pm

Meeting Place: PAR 1 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course presents the major themes of Algerian history from the sixteenth century to today. This story begins in 1516 and the Ottoman period, when formidable fleets of Algerian corsairs struggled with Spanish, French, and even American ships in the “jihad al-bahr” (jihad at sea). The course ends after a grueling but brilliantly won war of national liberation against colonial France (1954-62) became a revolution betrayed, when Algeria entered a period of terrorism in the 1990s. Algeria’s history intersects several fields of study (European, African, and Middle Eastern studies) and it is a country that has been home to Muslims, Christians, and Jews, speaking many different languages. The course seeks to give expression to these multi-religious and multi-linguistic traditions. Therefore, students should be ready to cross methodological and cultural borders.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: 

Students will learn the skills of historical analysis and interpretation, along with the material described above. This will include the ability to grasp the complexity of historical debates and rethink received knowledge and concepts in light of new evidence.  Coursework and evaluations will focus on students’ ability to articulate coherent and sustained arguments in writing and verbally.  There are no pre-requisites beyond those generally associated with a course of this level.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

You will need to purchase the following books or use reserve copies in library.

  1. Henri Alleg, The Question (Bison Books, 2006), ISBN: 0803259603
  2. Assia Djebar, Algerian White (Seven Stories Press, 2003) ISBN: 1583225161.
  3. 3.     Mouloud Feraoun, The Poor Man's Son: Menrad, Kabyle Schoolteacher (University of Virginia Press, 2005).  ISBN: 0813923263
  4. Rachid Mimouni, The Honor of the Tribe: A Novel (William Morrow, 1992) 0688097464
  5. John Ruedy, Modern Algeria: The Origins and Development of a Nation (Indiana University Press, 2005) ISBN: 0253217822

Additional required readings noted in schedule of class meetings will be distributed electronically or placed on library reserve. 

Other: Required material in the course also includes music, photographs, films and various visual texts such as music videos.

COURSE RULES:

  • Students are expected to disable the Internet accessibility function of all electronic devises used in class.
  • Cell phone use of any sort will not be tolerated.

ASSIGNMENTS:

  • Exams: There will be one midterm and a comprehensive final exam.  These exams will consist of analytical ID’s and essays.  A list of potential ID’s and questions will be distributed to prepare for the exams.  SEE BELOW FOR DATES.
  • Short response papers: In these papers you are asked to write four brief papers on the each of the books (Alleg, Djebar, Feraoun, Mimouni) we will read. You will summarize and analyze how each fits into the themes of Algerian history. Length: 2-3 pp., double-spaced, 12 pnt. font. Proofread carefully: correct use of language is expected and will figure in grading. Due dates: in the class meeting scheduled for discussion of each book.

 

Grades:

Midterm                        25%                       

Final Exam                        35%

Writing                        25%

Participation                        15%

Plus/Minus grading will be used for all grading in this course.  The grade scale is as follows:

100-93% = A; 92-90% = A- ; 89-87% = B+ ; 86-83% = B ; 82-80% = B- ; 79-77% = C+ ; 76-73% = C ; 72-70% = C- ; 69-67% = D+ ; 66-63% = D ; 62-60% = D- ; below 60% = F.

ATTENDANCE:

  • Attendance, preparation, and active participation in all course sessions are mandatory.
  • Please familiarize yourself with the University’s policy concerning excused absences. Unexcused absences will impinge upon your final grade: 2 unexcused absences will result in the loss of 1 full letter grade; more than 4 will result in loss of 2 full letter grades.
  • Religious Holy Days: By University policy, please notify me of your pending absence fourteen days prior to the anticipated date of observance of religious holy days. If you must miss a class, an examination, or an assignment, for religious observance, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

University of Texas Honor Code

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community. 

All work for this course will be that of the student and original contributions. I militantly pursue cases of suspected plagiarism and cheating.

*** Late assignments are penalized, plagiarism is prosecuted***

Disabilities

The University of Texas at Austin provides accommodations for students with disabilities. Contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 or 232-2937 (video phone).

 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE OF CLASS MEETINGS

(Subject to Revisions and Changes)

WEEK ONE: January 20 & 22

Introduction

Wednesday: Introduction

Friday:  The Question of Borders           

 

WEEK TWO: January 25-29

Algeria and the Mediterranean World

Monday, Space and Time in the Maghreb

Wednesday, Algerian Geography 

Friday, The Sahara

 

WEEK THREE: February 1-5

Ottoman Algeria and the World around It

Monday, Discussion: Braudel, “The Longue Durée 

Wednesday, Algeria’s Cities

Friday, Mediterranean Trade

 

WEEK FOUR: February 8-12 (Read Reudy, pp. 1-44)

Ottoman Algeria and the Jihad at Sea

Monday, “Christians of Allah”: Captives and Slaves

Wednesday, Discussion: “Captivity Narratives”

Friday, Uncle Sam in Barbary and the Barbary Wars 

 

WEEK FIVE: February 22-26 (Read Reudy, pp. 45-)

The French Invasion & Algerian Responses, 1830-39

Monday, Prelude: Bonaparte in Egypt

Wednesday, The French Revolution and the End of Ottoman Algeria

Friday, Algerian Notables React

 

WEEK SIX: March 1-5 (Read Reudy, pp. -79)

The Total Conquest of Algeria, 1839-57

Monday, Extermination, Expulsion, or Accommodation: The “Indigenous Question”

Wednesday, Discussion: “Abdelkader on Jihad”

Friday, The Conquest of the Sahara

 

WEEK SEVEN: March 8-12

Monday, Mid-Term Review

Wednesday, ***MID TERM EXAM***

Friday, Historians views of French Empire

 

WEEK EIGHT: March 15-19

Spring Break

 

WEEK NINE: March 22-26 (Read Reudy, pp. 80-113)

Colonial Governmentality, 1871-1930

 Monday, The Land Question & the Saint Simonians

Wednesday, France’s Nationalization of Islam & the “Arab Kingdom”

Friday, French Algeria at 100 years, the 1830 Centenary

 

WEEK TEN: March 29-April 2 (Read Reudy, pp. 114-155)

Reform Movements & The Rise of Nationalism

Monday, Emir Khaled & the Young Algerians 

Wednesday, Discussion: Mouloud Feraoun, The Poor Man's Son (IN FULL) 

Friday, Islamic Reform Movement & Algerian Nationalists

 

WEEK ELEVEN: April 5-9 (Read Reudy, pp. 156-194)

The Algerian War of Independence, 1954-62

Monday, Why War?

Wednesday, Discussion: Alleg, The Question

Friday, The FLN’s Military and Diplomatic Victory

 

WEEK TWELVE: April 12-16 (Read Reudy, pp. 195-230)

The Triumphs and Trials of Independence

Monday, The FLN State and Society 

Wednesday, Ben Bella to Boumedienne

Friday, Discussion: Mimouni, The Honor of the Tribe (IN FULL)

Film: Omar Gatlato (Directed by M. Allouache, 1976), screening time TBA

 

WEEK THIRTEEN: April 19-23

Algeria’s Other Wilaya: France

Monday, Algerian Immigration to France, Emigration from Algeria 

Wednesday, Post-Colonial France and Its Muslims

Friday, Music Videos: Dahmane El Harrachi, “Ya Raya” & 113, “Princes de la ville” (2000) “Banlieu” (2005)

 

WEEK FOURTEEN: April 26-30 (Read Reudy, pp. 231-288)

Years of Terror 1988-1999

Monday, The Unraveling: October 1988 & Rise of the Islamist Opposition

Wednesday, A Civil War or a War on Civilians?

Friday, Discussion: Djebar, Algerian White [IN FULL]

Film: Bab El-Oued City (Directed by M. Allouache, 1994), screening time TBA 

 

WEEK FIFTEEN: May 3-7

Conclusion: Algeria at a Global Crossroad

Monday, Neo-Liberalism and the Revolutionary Legacy: The Harraga

Wednesday, Blowback: Al-Qaeda and the “War on Terror” in Algeria

Friday, Conclusion

 

***FINAL EXAM Wednesday, May 12, 7:00–10:00 pm***

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