Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
mes masthead
Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

Jeannette Okur

Lecturer Ph.D., Ankara University, 2007

Jeannette Okur

Contact

Interests

late Ottoman and modern Turkish literature, teaching culture and literature in the foreign language classroom, comparative literature, translation studies

TUR 601C • Intensive Turkish I

42435 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 2.122
(also listed as TUR 381H )
show description

his beginning level course is designed for students who aim to learn modern Turkish. Throughout the course, students will be presented with learning opportunities for increasing their language skills in four areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing. In particular, this course specifically builds listening and oral communication skills in social and informal settings. Communicative tasks on personal and informal academic topics aim to develop vocabulary and improve fluency and pronunciation. The activities that students will engage in will include oral presentations, discussion groups that will focus on topics related to the themes discussed in class, interviews, debates, listening to news, stories, lectures, and answering questions to demonstrate an understanding of main ideas and important details in a reading text. Students will also write short paragraphs on a variety of topics and read a number of short and authentic texts. Listening activities will help them develop comprehension and paraphrasing skills in Turkish. Not open to native speakers of Turkish.  

TEXTS/READINGS

Life with Turkish I – to be provided by course instructor

GRADING POLICY

To be provided by course instructor

TUR 325K • Advanced Turkish I

42445 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.104
show description

This course builds communicative skills in modern Turkish through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities in and outside of class. The course focuses on Advanced level tasks and topics of public and personal interest, (such as current events, literature, local history, etc.) as well as developing more precise academic reading strategies and listening skills.  Class sessions will emphasize communication and comprehension skills, while introducing more advanced stylistic structures of the written and oral language, broadening vocabulary fields, and emphasizing correct pronunciation and intonation in context.  Students will increase their knowledge of Turkish culture, politics, history, etc. via interaction with a variety of authentic texts drawn from Turkish newspapers, magazines, textbooks, literary anthologies, radio and television programs, films, and the Internet.  At the end of the semester, students should expect to be able to initiate, sustain, and bring to closure a wide variety of communicative tasks, including those that require an increased ability to interpret or convey meaning with diverse language strategies in the case of a complication or unforeseen turn of events.  In addition to daily reading, listening, and writing homework, the course requires active participation in group work in class, presentations, quizzes, and tests.

Prerequisite:  TUR 320K and TUR 320L with a letter grade of C or higher (or permission of Dr. Okur AND a satisfactory score on the DMES diagnostic placement exam).

Texts & Grading

To be determined.

TUR 381H • Intensive Turkish I

42460 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 2.122
(also listed as TUR 601C )
show description

his beginning level course is designed for students who aim to learn modern Turkish. Throughout the course, students will be presented with learning opportunities for increasing their language skills in four areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing. In particular, this course specifically builds listening and oral communication skills in social and informal settings. Communicative tasks on personal and informal academic topics aim to develop vocabulary and improve fluency and pronunciation. The activities that students will engage in will include oral presentations, discussion groups that will focus on topics related to the themes discussed in class, interviews, debates, listening to news, stories, lectures, and answering questions to demonstrate an understanding of main ideas and important details in a reading text. Students will also write short paragraphs on a variety of topics and read a number of short and authentic texts. Listening activities will help them develop comprehension and paraphrasing skills in Turkish. Not open to native speakers of Turkish.  

TEXTS/READINGS

Life with Turkish I – to be provided by course instructor

GRADING POLICY

To be provided by course instructor

MES 341 • Negotiating Urbnzatn: Turky

42505 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ 1.210
(also listed as C L 323 )
show description

Turkey, like so many other nations, was transformed by rapid urbanization in the twentieth century. Today, almost 70% of the Turkish population lives in cities, mostly concentrated in the western Marmara, Aegean and Mediterranean regions. Fabled Istanbul, straddling Europe and Asia and one of history’s critical crossroads, spreads inexorably along both sides of the Bosphorus and boasts a population of 12.8 million, making it not only the largest city in Turkey, but also the 5th largest city proper in the world and the second largest metropolitan area in Europe by population. Three hundred miles to the east lies Ankara, the Anatolian town that Kemal Atatürk made the capital of the new Turkish republic in 1923. Cockpit of a highly centralized political system, Ankara, too, has experienced dizzying growth, especially since the 1970’s, when migrants flooding in from the impoverished countryside began to build sprawling squatter settlements. Students in this course will first examine local and transnational forces that have driven (and continue to drive) contemporary urbanization in Turkey, and then focus on key issues that emerge in rapidly growing cities of the developing world, such as growing income inequality and socio-economic exclusion, environmental challenges, and rising violence. In addition to texts by sociologists and cultural anthropologists, students will analyze Turkish literary and cinematic depictions of the distinctive economic, social, and political changes associated with concentrating people into large settlements, such as specialization of the labor force, alterations in family structure, and changes in the political attitudes of urban dwellers. Class sessions will be discussion-based and focus on a critical analysis of the arguments presented in the readings and films.

Texts

1. A Turkish Triangle. Ankara, Istanbul and Izmir at the Gates of Europe. (2010) Eds. Hashim Sarkis and Neyran Turan. Harvard Graduate School of Design. Cambridge, MA. ISBN-13: 978-0935617900. 2. Tekin, Latife. Berji Kristin: Tales from the Garbage Hills. Marion Boyars Publishers Ltd, 2000. ISBN-13: 978-0714530116 3. Kemal, Yaşar. The Sea-Crossed Fisherman. Minerva, 1990. ISBN-13: 978-07493905 (available used).

Other required texts to be provided via Blackboard. 

Grading

Attendance and Participation 20%, Reader Response Papers 40%, “Urban Snapshot” Presentation 10%, Final (Critical Essay) Exam 30%

TUR 611C • Intensive Turkish II

42830 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 210
(also listed as TUR 381J )
show description

Course Description

This intermediate level intensive language course is designed for students who have taken Beginning Intensive Turkish and have mastered basic vocabulary and structure. Throughout this course, you will have many learning opportunities for increasing your language skills in four areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as your knowledge of Turkish culture. This course especially focuses on building listening and oral communication skills in social and informal settings. Communicative tasks on personal and informal academic topics help you expand your vocabulary and improve fluency and pronunciation. Activities include oral presentations, discussion groups that will focus on topics related to the themes discussed in class, interviews, debates, listening to news, stories, lectures, and discussing reading and listening texts. You will also write short essays on a variety of topics and read authentic texts written by Turkish speakers for Turkish speakers. Listening activities will help you develop aural comprehension skills in Turkish. Interactive materials will be available on the course website. “Turkce ile Yasam II” (Life with Turkish) a course-pack prepared by the course instructor will be used for this course. Not open to native speakers of Turkish.

At the end of the course, you are expected achieve the following goals.

Speaking:

 able to converse with ease and confidence when dealing with most routine tasks and social situations of the Intermediate level,

 able to handle successfully many uncomplicated tasks and social situations requiring an exchange of basic information related to work, school, recreation, particular interests and areas of competence,

 able to narrate and describe in major time frames using connected discourse of paragraph length.

Listening:

 able to sustain understanding over longer stretches of connected speech on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places and conversational exchanges on daily life topics.

Writing:

 able to meet all practical writing needs such as taking notes on familiar topics, writing uncomplicated letters, simple summaries, and compositions related to work, school experiences, and topics of current and general interest.

 able to write simple descriptions and narrations of paragraph length on everyday events and situations in different time frames.

Reading:

 able to read consistently with full understanding simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge,

 able to get some main ideas and information from texts at the next higher level featuring description and narration.

Culture:

 Learn aspects of Turkish culture which impact the daily life of Turkish people. n Build toward an appreciation of cultural differences.

 

Course Materials

A course pack is available on the Blackboard. Further materials will be available through the course website and also Blackboard. You may use an online dictionary if you need for homework. www.seslisozluk.com is highly recommended.

Grading

Daily homework, writing assignments, and participation: 30%

Quizzes and vocabulary tests: 20 %

Presentations and role plays: 20 %

Cultural portfolio: 15 %

Final exam: 10 %

Blackboard activities: 5 %

Bonus: 5 %

May vary with instructor by semester.

TUR 381J • Intensive Turkish II

42860 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 210
(also listed as TUR 611C )
show description

Course Description

This intermediate level intensive language course is designed for students who have taken Beginning Intensive Turkish and have mastered basic vocabulary and structure. Throughout this course, you will have many learning opportunities for increasing your language skills in four areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as your knowledge of Turkish culture. This course especially focuses on building listening and oral communication skills in social and informal settings. Communicative tasks on personal and informal academic topics help you expand your vocabulary and improve fluency and pronunciation. Activities include oral presentations, discussion groups that will focus on topics related to the themes discussed in class, interviews, debates, listening to news, stories, lectures, and discussing reading and listening texts. You will also write short essays on a variety of topics and read authentic texts written by Turkish speakers for Turkish speakers. Listening activities will help you develop aural comprehension skills in Turkish. Interactive materials will be available on the course website. “Turkce ile Yasam II” (Life with Turkish) a course-pack prepared by the course instructor will be used for this course. Not open to native speakers of Turkish.

At the end of the course, you are expected achieve the following goals.

Speaking:

 able to converse with ease and confidence when dealing with most routine tasks and social situations of the Intermediate level,

 able to handle successfully many uncomplicated tasks and social situations requiring an exchange of basic information related to work, school, recreation, particular interests and areas of competence,

 able to narrate and describe in major time frames using connected discourse of paragraph length.

Listening:

 able to sustain understanding over longer stretches of connected speech on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places and conversational exchanges on daily life topics.

Writing:

 able to meet all practical writing needs such as taking notes on familiar topics, writing uncomplicated letters, simple summaries, and compositions related to work, school experiences, and topics of current and general interest.

 able to write simple descriptions and narrations of paragraph length on everyday events and situations in different time frames.

Reading:

 able to read consistently with full understanding simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge,

 able to get some main ideas and information from texts at the next higher level featuring description and narration.

Culture:

 Learn aspects of Turkish culture which impact the daily life of Turkish people. n Build toward an appreciation of cultural differences.

 

Course Materials

A course pack is available on the Blackboard. Further materials will be available through the course website and also Blackboard. You may use an online dictionary if you need for homework. www.seslisozluk.com is highly recommended.

Grading

Daily homework, writing assignments, and participation: 30%

Quizzes and vocabulary tests: 20 %

Presentations and role plays: 20 %

Cultural portfolio: 15 %

Final exam: 10 %

Blackboard activities: 5 %

Bonus: 5 %

May vary with instructor by semester.

TUR 601C • Intensive Turkish I

42677 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BEN 1.106
(also listed as TUR 381H )
show description

This beginning level course is designed for students who aim to learn modern Turkish. Throughout the course, students will be presented with learning opportunities for increasing their language skills in four areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing. In particular, this course specifically builds listening and oral communication skills in social and informal settings. Communicative tasks on personal and informal academic topics aim to develop vocabulary and improve fluency and pronunciation. The activities that students will engage in will include oral presentations, discussion groups that will focus on topics related to the themes discussed in class, interviews, debates, listening to news, stories, lectures, and answering questions to demonstrate an understanding of main ideas and important details in a reading text. Students will also write short paragraphs on a variety of topics and read a number of short and authentic texts. Listening activities will help them develop comprehension and paraphrasing skills in Turkish. Not open to native speakers of Turkish.  

TEXTS/READINGS

Life with Turkish I – to be provided by course instructor

GRADING POLICY

To be provided by course instructor

TUR 329 • Advanced Turkish I

42685 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GDC 2.402
show description

This course builds communicative skills in modern Turkish through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities in and outside of class. The course focuses on Advanced level tasks and topics of public and personal interest, (such as current events, literature, local history, etc.) as well as developing more precise academic reading strategies and listening skills.  Class sessions will emphasize communication and comprehension skills, while introducing more advanced stylistic structures of the written and oral language, broadening vocabulary fields, and emphasizing correct pronunciation and intonation in context.  Students will increase their knowledge of Turkish culture, politics, history, etc. via interaction with a variety of authentic texts drawn from Turkish newspapers, magazines, textbooks, literary anthologies, radio and television programs, films, and the Internet.  At the end of the semester, students should expect to be able to initiate, sustain, and bring to closure a wide variety of communicative tasks, including those that require an increased ability to interpret or convey meaning with diverse language strategies in the case of a complication or unforeseen turn of events.  In addition to daily reading, listening, and writing homework, the course requires active participation in group work in class, presentations, quizzes, and tests.

Prerequisite:  TUR 320K and TUR 320L with a letter grade of C or higher (or permission of Dr. Okur AND a satisfactory score on the DMES diagnostic placement exam).

Texts & Grading

To be determined.

ISL 372 • Turks In Europe

41695 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 101
(also listed as EUS 347, MEL 321 )
show description

In the last century, international markets, political conditions, and the desire for “a better life” have spurred mass migration to “First World” nations, creating a myriad of new socio-cultural and political-economic constellations as well as serious structural challenges.  Interactions between Europeans and Turks, for example, are not new, but seem have increased in variety and complexity since the post-World War II era, when European countries began importing Turkish labor. Today over 9 million Turks live, work and study in Europe, some with full citizenship rights, others with permanent or temporary visas; and their presence has impacted not only European economies, but also European politics, media, education systems, social structures, cultural norms, the arts scene, and even language.  Students in this course will first examine local and transnational forces that have driven (and continue to drive) Turkish-European interactions, and then focus on key issues that have emerged in the context of 20th century Turkish migration to and settlement in Europe as well as in the context of Turkey’s more recent bid to join the European Union.  In addition to texts by sociologists, political scientists and cultural anthropologists, students will analyze Turkish-European literary and cinematic depictions of the distinctive economic, socio-cultural, and political changes associated with the migration of Turks to Europe and their transition from guest worker to transnational citizen. Among the topics to be discussed are: social processes and cultural adaptation; the education of second-, third- and fourth-generation migrants; the relationship of civil society and Islam; ethnic communities and ethnic business; citizenship and political participation; asylum movements and xenophobia; and attitudes toward the European Union.  Class sessions will be discussion-based and focus on a critical analysis of the arguments presented in the readings and films. This course has no prerequisites.

TENTATIVE Texts

Required Full Texts:

  1. Abadan-Unat, Nermin.  Turks in Europe: from guest worker to transnational citizen.  New York : Berghahn Books, 2011.
  2. Öner, Selcen.  Turkey and the European Union: The Question of European Identity.  Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc., 2011.
  3. Ören, Aras.  Please, No Police.  Trans. Teoman Sıpahigil. Austin, TX: Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of Texas at Austin, 1992.
  4. Özdamar, Emine Sevgi. The Bridge of the Golden Horn. Trans. Martin Chalmers. London:  Serpents Tail, 2009.
  5. Additional texts available on Blackboard.

Grading

Students' course grade will be based on active participation in class discussions (20%); satisfactory completion of (8 out of 10) reader response papers (40%); the quality of their “Turks in Europe Snapshot”, a short oral presentation on a historical event or contemporary issue related to Turks’ experience in or contributions to Europe (10%); and a final (critical essay) exam (30%).

MEL 321 • Turks In Europe

41795 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 101
(also listed as EUS 347, ISL 372 )
show description

In the last century, international markets, political conditions, and the desire for “a better life” have spurred mass migration to “First World” nations, creating a myriad of new socio-cultural and political-economic constellations as well as serious structural challenges.  Interactions between Europeans and Turks, for example, are not new, but seem have increased in variety and complexity since the post-World War II era, when European countries began importing Turkish labor. Today over 9 million Turks live, work and study in Europe, some with full citizenship rights, others with permanent or temporary visas; and their presence has impacted not only European economies, but also European politics, media, education systems, social structures, cultural norms, the arts scene, and even language.  Students in this course will first examine local and transnational forces that have driven (and continue to drive) Turkish-European interactions, and then focus on key issues that have emerged in the context of 20th century Turkish migration to and settlement in Europe as well as in the context of Turkey’s more recent bid to join the European Union.  In addition to texts by sociologists, political scientists and cultural anthropologists, students will analyze Turkish-European literary and cinematic depictions of the distinctive economic, socio-cultural, and political changes associated with the migration of Turks to Europe and their transition from guest worker to transnational citizen. Among the topics to be discussed are: social processes and cultural adaptation; the education of second-, third- and fourth-generation migrants; the relationship of civil society and Islam; ethnic communities and ethnic business; citizenship and political participation; asylum movements and xenophobia; and attitudes toward the European Union.  Class sessions will be discussion-based and focus on a critical analysis of the arguments presented in the readings and films. This course has no prerequisites.

TENTATIVE Texts

Required Full Texts:

  1. Abadan-Unat, Nermin.  Turks in Europe: from guest worker to transnational citizen.  New York : Berghahn Books, 2011.
  2. Öner, Selcen.  Turkey and the European Union: The Question of European Identity.  Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc., 2011.
  3. Ören, Aras.  Please, No Police.  Trans. Teoman Sıpahigil. Austin, TX: Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of Texas at Austin, 1992.
  4. Özdamar, Emine Sevgi. The Bridge of the Golden Horn. Trans. Martin Chalmers. London:  Serpents Tail, 2009.
  5. Additional texts available on Blackboard.

Grading

Students' course grade will be based on active participation in class discussions (20%); satisfactory completion of (8 out of 10) reader response papers (40%); the quality of their “Turks in Europe Snapshot”, a short oral presentation on a historical event or contemporary issue related to Turks’ experience in or contributions to Europe (10%); and a final (critical essay) exam (30%).

TUR 320L • Intermediate Turkish II

42240 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ B0.302
show description

This course builds communicative skills in modern Turkish through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities in and outside of class. The course focuses on Intermediate High level tasks and topics, which invovle daily life and material culture, as well as developing efficient reading strategies and listening skills. Class sessions will emphasize communication and comprehension skills, while introducing more advanced grammatical structures of the language and broadening vocabulary fields. Students will increase their knowledge of Turkish culture via short pieces of literature, music, film, art, and other realia. At the end of the semester students should expect to be able to communicate with others about their lives and interests, and understand texts on familiar topics. In addition to daily reading, listening, and writing homework, the course requires active participants in a group work in class, presentations, quizzes, and tests. Students should expect to spend two hours of homework daily. Students taking TUR 320L will be encouraged to participate in a weekly Turkish conversation hour and other Turkish cultural events organized during the course of the semester. Not open to native speakers of Turkish.

Prerequisite: TUR 320K with a letter grade of C or higher. 

Upon successful completion of Intermediate Turkish II, students will be able to

 

  • handle successfully most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situtations.
  • initiate, sustain, and close a general conversation with a number of strategies appropriate to a range of circumstances and topics, despite errors.
  • narrate with some accuracy autobiographical information, provide simple descriptions, and express some feelings.
  • sustain understanding over longer stretches of connected oral discourse on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places
  • understand main ideas and some facts from interactive informal discourse and linguistically simple connected aural texts on TV/film media, brief factual information on international news, and interviews where the subject matter is familiar and topical
  • read consistently with full understanding simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge
  • get some main ideas and information from texts at the next higher level (featuring description and narration), despite not fully understanding their structural complexity. 
  • take notes in some detail on familiar topics and respond in writing to personal questions. 
  • write simple letters, brief synopses and paraphrases, summaries of biographical data, work and school experience. 
  • describe and narrate in paragraphs, in which the use of cohesive elements is limited, but an expanded vocabulary base and good control of the basic structures is evident.
  • gain greater awareness and appreciation of and insight into the Turkish culture
  • become familiar with a number of Turkish short story writers
Course Materials Oztopcu's A Complete Course for Beginners Additional materials to be provided by instructor via Blackboard. Requirements and Grading Attendance and Particpation: 20% Homework Assignments: 30% Quizzes, Skits/Oral Presentations: 35% Final Examination: 15% May vary with instructor by semester.

ISL 373 • Love In The East And West

41500 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as C L 323, CTI 345, MEL 321, MES 342 )
show description

Participants in this course will examine various definitions and cultural representations of love, as expressed in major Eastern and Western literary works, and explore the question, "To what extent do conceptions and representations of love differ cross-culturally?"  Class activities will include mini-lectures and performance reading, as well as comparative analysis and discussion of the portrayal of topics like "love and beauty," "love and separation,"  "love and madness," "love and marriage," "love and time," "love and war," "love and self-sacrifice," "love and death," and "love for the divine and love for the human".  Participants will also, on occasion, be introduced to significant musical, visual art and cinematic forms/productions related to the poetry, prose and theatrical works read.  Students’ engagement in reader response writing and peer review of that writing will enhance the quality of their small and large group discussions.  This course hold a UT Writing Flag.

As all texts will be read in English translation, there is no language prerequisite.  However, students capable of reading some texts in the original language/s will be encouraged to do so.

Prerequisites:  The course has no prerequisites.

Languages Across the Curriculum Component:  Students who have completed the Intermediate Turkish sequence (ie. have earned a grade of C or higher in TUR 320L) are eligible to sign up for an additional credit hour in Turkish language via the “Languages Across the Curriculum Program”.  Students taking this credit hour with Dr. Okur will read and discuss short texts in Turkish (and view and discuss additional Turkish films) related to the main course topics.

Texts

The Story of Layla and Majnun by Nizami; The Romance of Tristan and Iseult; Yusuf and Zuleyha. An Allegorical Romance;  The Sorrows of Young Werther;  Jamilia;  The Forty Rules of Love. A Book of Rumi.

Grading Policy

Attendance and Participation       20%

Reader Response Papers   15%

Mid-Term Exam        15%    

Final Paper/Presentation  35%

Final Exam    15%

MEL 321 • Love In The East And West

41590 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as C L 323, CTI 345, ISL 373, MES 342 )
show description

Participants in this course will examine various definitions and cultural representations of love, as expressed in major Eastern and Western literary works, and explore the question, "To what extent do conceptions and representations of love differ cross-culturally?"  Class activities will include mini-lectures and performance reading, as well as comparative analysis and discussion of the portrayal of topics like "love and beauty," "love and separation,"  "love and madness," "love and marriage," "love and time," "love and war," "love and self-sacrifice," "love and death," and "love for the divine and love for the human".  Participants will also, on occasion, be introduced to significant musical, visual art and cinematic forms/productions related to the poetry, prose and theatrical works read.  Students’ engagement in reader response writing and peer review of that writing will enhance the quality of their small and large group discussions.  This course hold a UT Writing Flag.

As all texts will be read in English translation, there is no language prerequisite.  However, students capable of reading some texts in the original language/s will be encouraged to do so.

Prerequisites:  The course has no prerequisites.

Languages Across the Curriculum Component:  Students who have completed the Intermediate Turkish sequence (ie. have earned a grade of C or higher in TUR 320L) are eligible to sign up for an additional credit hour in Turkish language via the “Languages Across the Curriculum Program”.  Students taking this credit hour with Dr. Okur will read and discuss short texts in Turkish (and view and discuss additional Turkish films) related to the main course topics.

Texts

The Story of Layla and Majnun by Nizami; The Romance of Tristan and Iseult; Yusuf and Zuleyha. An Allegorical Romance;  The Sorrows of Young Werther;  Jamilia;  The Forty Rules of Love. A Book of Rumi.

Grading Policy

Attendance and Participation       20%

Reader Response Papers   15%

Mid-Term Exam        15%    

Final Paper/Presentation  35%

Final Exam    15%

MES 342 • Love In The East And West

41730 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as C L 323, CTI 345, ISL 373, MEL 321 )
show description

Participants in this course will examine various definitions and cultural representations of love, as expressed in major Eastern and Western literary works, and explore the question, "To what extent do conceptions and representations of love differ cross-culturally?"  Class activities will include mini-lectures and performance reading, as well as comparative analysis and discussion of the portrayal of topics like "love and beauty," "love and separation,"  "love and madness," "love and marriage," "love and time," "love and war," "love and self-sacrifice," "love and death," and "love for the divine and love for the human".  Participants will also, on occasion, be introduced to significant musical, visual art and cinematic forms/productions related to the poetry, prose and theatrical works read.  Students’ engagement in reader response writing and peer review of that writing will enhance the quality of their small and large group discussions.  This course hold a UT Writing Flag.

As all texts will be read in English translation, there is no language prerequisite.  However, students capable of reading some texts in the original language/s will be encouraged to do so.

Prerequisites:  The course has no prerequisites.

Languages Across the Curriculum Component:  Students who have completed the Intermediate Turkish sequence (ie. have earned a grade of C or higher in TUR 320L) are eligible to sign up for an additional credit hour in Turkish language via the “Languages Across the Curriculum Program”.  Students taking this credit hour with Dr. Okur will read and discuss short texts in Turkish (and view and discuss additional Turkish films) related to the main course topics.

Texts

The Story of Layla and Majnun by Nizami; The Romance of Tristan and Iseult; Yusuf and Zuleyha. An Allegorical Romance;  The Sorrows of Young Werther;  Jamilia;  The Forty Rules of Love. A Book of Rumi.

Grading Policy

Attendance and Participation       20%

Reader Response Papers   15%

Mid-Term Exam        15%    

Final Paper/Presentation  35%

Final Exam    15%

TUR 601C • Intensive Turkish I

42025 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BEN 1.106
show description

This beginning level course is designed for students who aim to learn modern Turkish. Throughout the course, students will be presented with learning opportunities for increasing their language skills in four areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing. In particular, this course specifically builds listening and oral communication skills in social and informal settings. Communicative tasks on personal and informal academic topics aim to develop vocabulary and improve fluency and pronunciation. The activities that students will engage in will include oral presentations, discussion groups that will focus on topics related to the themes discussed in class, interviews, debates, listening to news, stories, lectures, and answering questions to demonstrate an understanding of main ideas and important details in a reading text. Students will also write short paragraphs on a variety of topics and read a number of short and authentic texts. Listening activities will help them develop comprehension and paraphrasing skills in Turkish. Not open to native speakers of Turkish.  

TEXTS/READINGS

Life with Turkish I – to be provided by course instructor

GRADING POLICY

To be provided by course instructor

TUR W372 • Culs & Lits Of Turkey & Us-Tur

87140 • Summer 2012
Meets
show description

DESCRIPTION:Participants in this course will examine local and regional cultural phenomena as expressed in literary works by well-known Turkish and American filmmaker/television producers, and explore questions such as: "What factors make a writer a local, regional and/or national writer?" "How do literary, film and mass media depictions of loca or regiona culture support or undermine notions of national culture?" "What is the importance of studying subcultures with a foreign culture?" In addition to studying literary texts, films and relevant samples of mass media, American and Turkish participants in this couse will be encouraged to reflect upon their own cultural lenses and share their educational/cultural backgrounds via cross-interviews and presentations.

COURSE LOCATION: TOBB Economics and Technology University in Ankara, Turkey

Texts/Readings

Contact Instructor

Grading Policy

Attendance and participation 20%,  Reader responses 20%,  Cross-Interviews & presentations 20%,  Mid-Term Exam 20%  Final Exam  20%

MES 322K • Women Flmmakrs In The Mid East

41705 • Spring 2012
Meets WF 200pm-300pm MEZ 1.120
(also listed as TUR 372, WGS 340 )
show description

Course Description

This course introduces students to the vast array of subject matter and cinematographic styles engaged by contemporary women filmmakers in the Middle East, with special focus on Turkey, an emerging center of women filmmakers in the region.  Students will view and discuss 12 films produced and/or directed by women filmmakers of varied national, ethnic, racial, religious and linguistic backgrounds.  Five of these films will be Turkish, and the other seven will be from Iran, Israel, and the Arab World. Weekly readings, post-viewing discussions and response papers about the documentary, autobiographical, fictional and art films selected will deepen participants’ insight into the socio-cultural dilemmas experienced by many Middle Eastern women in the 20th and 21st centuries and also heighten their awareness of the filmmakers’ political and aesthetic concerns.  Participants will be expected to attend the weekly film screenings, complete weekly reading and writing assignments, participate actively in class discussions, and pursue one thematically organized, independent viewing project.  All films will be screened in the original language/s with English subtitles.  No prior knowledge of a Middle Eastern language is necessary; however, students with knowledge of a particular Middle Eastern language or country may choose to focus their viewing project on a film, set of films or a filmmaker related to that language/country.

 

Texts

Students will purchase a reader containing selected articles from the following texts:

-           The Cinema of North Africa and the Middle East (2007). Ed. Gönül Dönmez-Colin.  Wallflower Press.  London.  ISBN-13:  978-1905674107.

-           Dönmez-Colin, Gönül. (2006) Cinemas of the Other. A Personal Journey with Film-makers from the Middle East and Central Asia.  Intellect Books.  Bristol, UK/Portland, OR.  ISBN-13:  978-184150137.

-           Dönmez-Colin, Gönül.  (2008) Turkish Cinema. Identity, Distance and Belonging.  Reaktion Books.  London.  ISBN-13:  978-1861893703.

-           Dönmez-Colin, Gönül. (2004) Women, Islam and Cinema.  Reaktion Books.  London.  ISBN-13: 978-1861892201.

-           Feminism and Film Theory (1988).  Ed. Constance Penley.  Routledge/New York and BFI Publishing/London.  ISBN-13:  978-041501086.

-           Feminist Film Theory. A Reader (1999).  Ed. Sue Thornham.  NYU Press.  New York.  ISBN-13: 978-0814782446.

-           The New Iranian Cinema: Politics, Representation and Identity.  Ed. Richard Tapper.  I.B. Tauris.  London/New York.  IBSN-13:  978-1860648045.

-           Suner, Asuman. (2010). New Turkish Cinema. Belonging, Identity and Memory.  I.B. Tauris. London/New York.  ISBN-13:  978-1845119508.

 

Grading & Requirements

Students' course grade will be based on active participation in class discussions (20%); satisfactory completion of (4 out of 5) reader response papers (40%); their performance on a mid-term critical essay test (15%) and the quality of their final viewing project, which will include both a critical essay and an oral presentation (25%).

TUR 320L • Intermediate Turkish II

42085 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BEN 1.124
show description

Course Description

This course builds communicative skills in modern Turkish through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities in and outside of class. The course focuses on Intermediate High level tasks and topics, which invovle daily life and material culture, as well as developing efficient reading strategies and listening skills. Class sessions will emphasize communication and comprehension skills, while introducing more advanced grammatical structures of the language and broadening vocabulary fields. Students will increase their knowledge of Turkish culture via short pieces of literature, music, film, art, and other realia. At the end of the semester students should expect to be able to communicate with others about their lives and interests, and understand texts on familiar topics. In addition to daily reading, listening, and writing homework, the course requires active participants in a group work in class, presentations, quizzes, and tests. Students should expect to spend two hours of homework daily. Students taking TUR 320L will be encouraged to participate in a weekly Turkish conversation hour and other Turkish cultural events organized during the course of the semester. Not open to native speakers of Turkish.

Prerequisite: TUR 320K with a letter grade of C or higher. 

Upon successful completion of Intermediate Turkish II, students will be able to

  • handle successfully most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situtations.
  • initiate, sustain, and close a general conversation with a number of strategies appropriate to a range of circumstances and topics, despite errors.
  • narrate with some accuracy autobiographical information, provide simple descriptions, and express some feelings.
  • sustain understanding over longer stretches of connected oral discourse on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places
  • understand main ideas and some facts from interactive informal discourse and linguistically simple connected aural texts on TV/film media, brief factual information on international news, and interviews where the subject matter is familiar and topical
  • read consistently with full understanding simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge
  • get some main ideas and information from texts at the next higher level (featuring description and narration), despite not fully understanding their structural complexity. 
  • take notes in some detail on familiar topics and respond in writing to personal questions. 
  • write simple letters, brief synopses and paraphrases, summaries of biographical data, work and school experience. 
  • describe and narrate in paragraphs, in which the use of cohesive elements is limited, but an expanded vocabulary base and good control of the basic structures is evident.
  • gain greater awareness and appreciation of and insight into the Turkish culture
  • become familiar with a number of Turkish short story writers
Course Materials
Oztopcu's A Complete Course for Beginners
Additional materials to be provided by instructor via Blackboard.
Requirements and Grading
Attendance and Particpation: 20%
Homework Assignments: 30%
Quizzes, Skits/Oral Presentations: 35%
Final Examination: 15%
May vary with instructor by semester. 

TUR 372 • Women Flmmakrs In The Mid East

42100 • Spring 2012
Meets WF 200pm-300pm MEZ 1.120
(also listed as MES 322K, WGS 340 )
show description

Course Description

This course introduces students to the vast array of subject matter and cinematographic styles engaged by contemporary women filmmakers in the Middle East, with special focus on Turkey, an emerging center of women filmmakers in the region.  Students will view and discuss 12 films produced and/or directed by women filmmakers of varied national, ethnic, racial, religious and linguistic backgrounds.  Five of these films will be Turkish, and the other seven will be from Iran, Israel, and the Arab World. Weekly readings, post-viewing discussions and response papers about the documentary, autobiographical, fictional and art films selected will deepen participants’ insight into the socio-cultural dilemmas experienced by many Middle Eastern women in the 20th and 21st centuries and also heighten their awareness of the filmmakers’ political and aesthetic concerns.  Participants will be expected to attend the weekly film screenings, complete weekly reading and writing assignments, participate actively in class discussions, and pursue one thematically organized, independent viewing project.  All films will be screened in the original language/s with English subtitles.  No prior knowledge of a Middle Eastern language is necessary; however, students with knowledge of a particular Middle Eastern language or country may choose to focus their viewing project on a film, set of films or a filmmaker related to that language/country.

 

Texts

Students will purchase a reader containing selected articles from the following texts:

-           The Cinema of North Africa and the Middle East (2007). Ed. Gönül Dönmez-Colin.  Wallflower Press.  London.  ISBN-13:  978-1905674107.

-           Dönmez-Colin, Gönül. (2006) Cinemas of the Other. A Personal Journey with Film-makers from the Middle East and Central Asia.  Intellect Books.  Bristol, UK/Portland, OR.  ISBN-13:  978-184150137.

-           Dönmez-Colin, Gönül.  (2008) Turkish Cinema. Identity, Distance and Belonging.  Reaktion Books.  London.  ISBN-13:  978-1861893703.

-           Dönmez-Colin, Gönül. (2004) Women, Islam and Cinema.  Reaktion Books.  London.  ISBN-13: 978-1861892201.

-           Feminism and Film Theory (1988).  Ed. Constance Penley.  Routledge/New York and BFI Publishing/London.  ISBN-13:  978-041501086.

-           Feminist Film Theory. A Reader (1999).  Ed. Sue Thornham.  NYU Press.  New York.  ISBN-13: 978-0814782446.

-           The New Iranian Cinema: Politics, Representation and Identity.  Ed. Richard Tapper.  I.B. Tauris.  London/New York.  IBSN-13:  978-1860648045.

-           Suner, Asuman. (2010). New Turkish Cinema. Belonging, Identity and Memory.  I.B. Tauris. London/New York.  ISBN-13:  978-1845119508.

 

Grading & Requirements

Students' course grade will be based on active participation in class discussions (20%); satisfactory completion of (4 out of 5) reader response papers (40%); their performance on a mid-term critical essay test (15%) and the quality of their final viewing project, which will include both a critical essay and an oral presentation (25%).

TUR 381L • Intmed Grad Lang Instructn II

42120 • Spring 2012
Meets
show description

Course Description

This course builds communicative skills in modern Turkish through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities in and outside of class. The course focuses on Intermediate High level tasks and topics, which invovle daily life and material culture, as well as developing efficient reading strategies and listening skills. Class sessions will emphasize communication and comprehension skills, while introducing more advanced grammatical structures of the language and broadening vocabulary fields. Students will increase their knowledge of Turkish culture via short pieces of literature, music, film, art, and other realia. At the end of the semester students should expect to be able to communicate with others about their lives and interests, and understand texts on familiar topics. In addition to daily reading, listening, and writing homework, the course requires active participants in a group work in class, presentations, quizzes, and tests. Students should expect to spend two hours of homework daily. Students taking TUR 320L will be encouraged to participate in a weekly Turkish conversation hour and other Turkish cultural events organized during the course of the semester. Not open to native speakers of Turkish.

Prerequisite: TUR 320K with a letter grade of C or higher. 

Upon successful completion of Intermediate Turkish II, students will be able to

 

  • handle successfully most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situtations.
  • initiate, sustain, and close a general conversation with a number of strategies appropriate to a range of circumstances and topics, despite errors.
  • narrate with some accuracy autobiographical information, provide simple descriptions, and express some feelings.
  • sustain understanding over longer stretches of connected oral discourse on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places
  • understand main ideas and some facts from interactive informal discourse and linguistically simple connected aural texts on TV/film media, brief factual information on international news, and interviews where the subject matter is familiar and topical
  • read consistently with full understanding simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge
  • get some main ideas and information from texts at the next higher level (featuring description and narration), despite not fully understanding their structural complexity. 
  • take notes in some detail on familiar topics and respond in writing to personal questions. 
  • write simple letters, brief synopses and paraphrases, summaries of biographical data, work and school experience. 
  • describe and narrate in paragraphs, in which the use of cohesive elements is limited, but an expanded vocabulary base and good control of the basic structures is evident.
  • gain greater awareness and appreciation of and insight into the Turkish culture
  • become familiar with a number of Turkish short story writers
Course Materials
Oztopcu's A Complete Course for Beginners
Additional materials to be provided by instructor via Blackboard.
Requirements and Grading
To be provided by instructor.

MES 326 • Negotiating Urbanizatn: Turkey

41555 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 420
(also listed as TUR 372, URB 354 )
show description

Turkey, like so many other nations, was transformed by rapid urbanization in the twentieth century.  Today, almost 70% of the Turkish population lives in cities, mostly concentrated in the western Marmara, Aegean and Mediterranean regions.  Fabled Istanbul, straddling Europe and Asia and one of history’s critical crossroads, spreads inexorably along both sides of the Bosphorus and boasts a population of 12.8 million, making it not only the largest city in Turkey, but also the 5th largest city proper in the world and the second largest metropolitan area in Europe by population.  Three hundred miles to the east lies Ankara, the Anatolian town that Kemal Atatürk made the capital of the new Turkish republic in 1923.  Cockpit of a highly centralized political system, Ankara, too, has experienced dizzying growth, especially since the 1970’s, when migrants flooding in from the impoverished countryside began to build sprawling squatter settlements.  Students in this course will first examine local and transnational forces that have driven (and continue to drive) contemporary urbanization in Turkey, and then focus on key issues that emerge in rapidly growing cities of the developing world, such as growing income inequality and socio-economic exclusion, environmental challenges, and rising violence.  In addition to texts by sociologists and cultural anthropologists, students will analyze Turkish literary and cinematic depictions of the distinctive economic, social, and political changes associated with concentrating people into large settlements, such as specialization of the labor force, alterations in family structure, and changes in the political attitudes of urban dwellers.  Class sessions will be discussion-based and focus on a critical analysis of the arguments presented in the readings and films.

Prerequisites:  The course has no prerequisites.

Languages Across the Curriculum Component:  Students who have completed the Intensive Turkish sequence (ie. have earned a grade of C or higher in TUR 611C) are eligible to sign up for an additional credit hour in Turkish language via the “Languages Across the Curriculum Program”.  Students taking this credit hour with Dr. Okur will read and discuss short texts in Turkish (and view and discuss additional Turkish films) related to the main course topics.

Grading:  Students' course grade will be based on active participation in class discussions (20%); satisfactory completion of (8 out of 10) reader response papers (40%); the quality of their “urban snapshot”, a short oral presentation on a historical event or contemporary issue related to urbanization in Turkey (10%); and a final (critical essay) exam (30%).

Required Texts (to buy):

1.      A Turkish Triangle. Ankara, Istanbul and Izmir at the Gates of Europe.  (2010) Eds. Hashim Sarkis and Neyran Turan.  Harvard Graduate School of Design.  Cambridge, MA.  ISBN-13: 978-0935617900.

2.      Tekin, Latife. Berji Kristin: Tales from the Garbage Hills. Marion Boyars Publishers Ltd, 2000. ISBN-13: 978-0714530116

3.      Kemal, Yaşar.  The Sea-Crossed Fisherman.  Minerva, 1990.ISBN-13: 978-07493905.

Required Texts (to be provided via Blackboard):

1.      Bartu, Ayfer. “Who Owns the Old Quarters?  Rewriting Histories in a Global Era”. In:  Istanbul: Between the Global and the Local, ed. Çağlar Keyder.  Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999, pp. 31-45.  ISBN-13:  978-0847694952.

2.      Bozdoğan, Sibel.  “From ‘Cubic Houses’ to Suburban Villas: Residential Architecture and the Elites in Turkey”.  In:  Turkey's Engagement with Modernity: Conflict and Change in the Twentieth Century.  Eds. Kerem Oktem, Celia Kerslake and Philip Robins. Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, pp. 405-424. ISBN-13: 978-0230233140.

3.      Çelik, Ayşe Betül.  “`I miss my village!’ Forced Kurdish Migrants in Istanbul and their Representation in Associations”. New Perpectives on Turkey, no. 32 (2005), pp. 137-163.

4.      Dönmez-Colin, Gönül.  “Migration, Dis/Misplacement and Exile”. In:  Turkish Cinema: Identity, Distance and Belonging. Reaktion Books, 2008, pp.57-88.  ISBN-13:  978-1861893703.

5.      Gürbilek, Nurdan. “Living in a Shop Window”.  In:  The New Cultural Climate in Turkey: Living in a Shop Window. Zed Books, Jan. 2011, pp.20-33.  ISBN-13: 978-1848134874.

6.      Halman, Talat S. “Big Town Blues:  Peasants “Abroad” in Turkish Literature”. In: Rapture and Revolution. Essays on Turkish Literatures. Ed. Jayne L. Warner. Syracuse UP, 2007, pp. 191-211.  ISBN-13:  978-0815631460.

7.      Lerner, Daniel.  The Grocer and The Chief:  A Parable”. In:  Urbanism in World Perspective. A Reader. Ed., Sylvia Fleis Fava. Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1968, pp. 369-388. (Source:  Daniel Lerner, The Passing of Traditional Society. Macmillan Co., 1958).

8.      Kacar, Duygu.  “Ankara, a Small Town, Transformed to a Nation’s Capital”. Journal of Planning History 2010 9: 43-65.  On-line version available at:  http://jph.sagepub.com/content/9/1/43

9.      Karpat, Kemal. “Historical roots of migration and the gecekondu in Turkey”.  In: The Gecekondu: Rural Migration and Urbanization. Cambridge University Press, 1976, pp. 48-77. ISBN-13: 978-0521106184.

10.  Keyder, Çağlar. “The Setting”. In:  Istanbul: Between the Global and the Local, ed. Çağlar Keyder.  Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999, pp. 3-28.  ISBN-13:  978-0847694952.

11.  Kutlu, Mustafa.  Sır [The Secret]. (Excerpts from unpublished tr. by Jeannette Okur.) Dergah Yayınları, 2004.

12.  Öncü, Ayşe. “Global Consumerism, Sexuality as a Public Spectacle, and the Cultural Remapping of Istanbul in the 1990’s”.  In: Fragments of Culture:  The Everyday of Modern Turkey. Eds. Deniz Kandiyoti and Ayşe Saktanber.  Rutgers University Press, 2002, pp. 171-190.

13.   Özbek, Meral. “Arabesk Culture: A Case of Modernization and Popular Identity”.  In:  Rethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey. Eds. Sibel Bozdoğan, Reşat Kasaba.  Seattle:  U. of Washington Press, 1997, pp. 211-232.  ISBN-13: 978-0295975979.

14.  Sabuncu, Başar. “A Shanty in Istanbul”, tr. Nermin Menemencioğlu. In:  İbrahim and Other Plays: An Anthology of Modern Turkish Drama. Vol.1., eds. Talat Halman and Jayne Warner. Syracuse UP, 2008, pp. 213-270. ISBN-13: 978-0815608974.

15.  Saktanber, Ayşe. “Formation of a middle-class ethos and its quotidian:  revitalizing Islam in urban Turkey”. In: Space, Culture and Power: New Identities in Globalizing Cities, eds. Ayşe Öncü and Petra Weyland. Zed Books, 1997, pp. 140-156.  ISBN-13:  978-1856495035.

16.  White, Jenny. “Tin Town to Fanatics: Turkey’s Rural to Urban Migration from 1923 to the Present.”  In:  Turkey's Engagement with Modernity: Conflict and Change in the Twentieth Century.  Eds. Kerem Oktem, Celia Kerslake and Philip Robins. Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, pp. 425-442.  ISBN-13: 978-0230233140.

Course Films:

1.      The Horse (At). (1982)  Director:  Ali Özgentürk.

2.      I Saw the Sun (Güneşi Gördüm). (2009) Director:  Mahzun Kırmızıgül.

3.      Distant (Uzak). (2002) Director:  Nuri Bilge Ceylan.

4.      Segments of Crossing the Bridge:  The Sounds of Istanbul (2005). Director:  Fatih Akın.

5.      Muhsin Bey (1987). Director:  Yavuz Turgul.

 

TUR 320K • Intermediate Turkish I

41835 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 2.102
show description

This course builds communicative skills in modern Turkish through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities in and outside of class. The course focuses on Intermediate High and selected Advanced tasks and topics, which involve daily life and material culture, and guides students to develop efficient reading, listening and viewing strategies.  Class sessions will emphasize communication and comprehension skills, while offering opportunities to practice more advanced grammatical structures of the language and newly acquired vocabulary.  Students will increase their knowledge of Turkish culture via interaction with short pieces of literature, music, film, art, documentary video and other realia and by completing a variety of interview tasks with native speakers of Turkish.  At the end of the semester students should expect to be able to communicate with others about their lives and interests, and understand level-appropriate oral and written texts about issues of personal and community/social relevance.  In addition to daily reading, listening, and writing homework, the course requires active participation in group work in class, presentations, quizzes, and tests. Students should expect to spend two hours on homework daily.  Students taking TUR 320K will be encouraged to participate in a weekly Turkish conversation hour and other Turkish cultural events organized during the course of the semester. 

Prerequisite:  TUR 611C with a letter grade of C or higher (or via placement via successful performance on the DMES Turkish placement exam)

Texts:  Yeni Hittit 2 Yabancılar İçin Türkçe Ders Kitabı,  Yeni Hittit 2 Yabancılar İçin Türkçe Çalışma Kitabı, and Yeni Hittit 2 Yabancılar İçin Türkçe Ders CDsi (3rd ed., Ankara Universitesi TÖMER, Ankara Üniversitesi Basımevi, Ankara, 2010); and other class materials to be provided by the instructor via the course Blackboard

Grading & Requirements:  Attendance and Participation (20%), Homework (20%), Homework Correction (5%), Quizzes (25%), Skit (5%), Culture Portfolio (5%), Native Speaker Interview Tasks (5%), Final Exam (15%)

TUR 372 • Negotiating Urbanizatn: Turkey

41845 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 420
(also listed as MES 326, URB 354 )
show description

Turkey, like so many other nations, was transformed by rapid urbanization in the twentieth century.  Today, almost 70% of the Turkish population lives in cities, mostly concentrated in the western Marmara, Aegean and Mediterranean regions.  Fabled Istanbul, straddling Europe and Asia and one of history’s critical crossroads, spreads inexorably along both sides of the Bosphorus and boasts a population of 12.8 million, making it not only the largest city in Turkey, but also the 5th largest city proper in the world and the second largest metropolitan area in Europe by population.  Three hundred miles to the east lies Ankara, the Anatolian town that Kemal Atatürk made the capital of the new Turkish republic in 1923.  Cockpit of a highly centralized political system, Ankara, too, has experienced dizzying growth, especially since the 1970’s, when migrants flooding in from the impoverished countryside began to build sprawling squatter settlements.  Students in this course will first examine local and transnational forces that have driven (and continue to drive) contemporary urbanization in Turkey, and then focus on key issues that emerge in rapidly growing cities of the developing world, such as growing income inequality and socio-economic exclusion, environmental challenges, and rising violence.  In addition to texts by sociologists and cultural anthropologists, students will analyze Turkish literary and cinematic depictions of the distinctive economic, social, and political changes associated with concentrating people into large settlements, such as specialization of the labor force, alterations in family structure, and changes in the political attitudes of urban dwellers.  Class sessions will be discussion-based and focus on a critical analysis of the arguments presented in the readings and films.

Prerequisites:  The course has no prerequisites.

Languages Across the Curriculum Component:  Students who have completed the Intensive Turkish sequence (ie. have earned a grade of C or higher in TUR 611C) are eligible to sign up for an additional credit hour in Turkish language via the “Languages Across the Curriculum Program”.  Students taking this credit hour with Dr. Okur will read and discuss short texts in Turkish (and view and discuss additional Turkish films) related to the main course topics.

Grading:  Students' course grade will be based on active participation in class discussions (20%); satisfactory completion of (8 out of 10) reader response papers (40%); the quality of their “urban snapshot”, a short oral presentation on a historical event or contemporary issue related to urbanization in Turkey (10%); and a final (critical essay) exam (30%).

Required Texts (to buy):

1.      A Turkish Triangle. Ankara, Istanbul and Izmir at the Gates of Europe.  (2010) Eds. Hashim Sarkis and Neyran Turan.  Harvard Graduate School of Design.  Cambridge, MA.  ISBN-13: 978-0935617900.

2.      Tekin, Latife. Berji Kristin: Tales from the Garbage Hills. Marion Boyars Publishers Ltd, 2000. ISBN-13: 978-0714530116

3.      Kemal, Yaşar.  The Sea-Crossed Fisherman.  Minerva, 1990.ISBN-13: 978-07493905.

Required Texts (to be provided via Blackboard):

1.      Bartu, Ayfer. “Who Owns the Old Quarters?  Rewriting Histories in a Global Era”. In:  Istanbul: Between the Global and the Local, ed. Çağlar Keyder.  Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999, pp. 31-45.  ISBN-13:  978-0847694952.

2.      Bozdoğan, Sibel.  “From ‘Cubic Houses’ to Suburban Villas: Residential Architecture and the Elites in Turkey”.  In:  Turkey's Engagement with Modernity: Conflict and Change in the Twentieth Century.  Eds. Kerem Oktem, Celia Kerslake and Philip Robins. Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, pp. 405-424. ISBN-13: 978-0230233140.

3.      Çelik, Ayşe Betül.  “`I miss my village!’ Forced Kurdish Migrants in Istanbul and their Representation in Associations”. New Perpectives on Turkey, no. 32 (2005), pp. 137-163.

4.      Dönmez-Colin, Gönül.  “Migration, Dis/Misplacement and Exile”. In:  Turkish Cinema: Identity, Distance and Belonging. Reaktion Books, 2008, pp.57-88.  ISBN-13:  978-1861893703.

5.      Gürbilek, Nurdan. “Living in a Shop Window”.  In:  The New Cultural Climate in Turkey: Living in a Shop Window. Zed Books, Jan. 2011, pp.20-33.  ISBN-13: 978-1848134874.

6.      Halman, Talat S. “Big Town Blues:  Peasants “Abroad” in Turkish Literature”. In: Rapture and Revolution. Essays on Turkish Literatures. Ed. Jayne L. Warner. Syracuse UP, 2007, pp. 191-211.  ISBN-13:  978-0815631460.

7.      Lerner, Daniel.  The Grocer and The Chief:  A Parable”. In:  Urbanism in World Perspective. A Reader. Ed., Sylvia Fleis Fava. Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1968, pp. 369-388. (Source:  Daniel Lerner, The Passing of Traditional Society. Macmillan Co., 1958).

8.      Kacar, Duygu.  “Ankara, a Small Town, Transformed to a Nation’s Capital”. Journal of Planning History 2010 9: 43-65.  On-line version available at:  http://jph.sagepub.com/content/9/1/43

9.      Karpat, Kemal. “Historical roots of migration and the gecekondu in Turkey”.  In: The Gecekondu: Rural Migration and Urbanization. Cambridge University Press, 1976, pp. 48-77. ISBN-13: 978-0521106184.

10.  Keyder, Çağlar. “The Setting”. In:  Istanbul: Between the Global and the Local, ed. Çağlar Keyder.  Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999, pp. 3-28.  ISBN-13:  978-0847694952.

11.  Kutlu, Mustafa.  Sır [The Secret]. (Excerpts from unpublished tr. by Jeannette Okur.) Dergah Yayınları, 2004.

12.  Öncü, Ayşe. “Global Consumerism, Sexuality as a Public Spectacle, and the Cultural Remapping of Istanbul in the 1990’s”.  In: Fragments of Culture:  The Everyday of Modern Turkey. Eds. Deniz Kandiyoti and Ayşe Saktanber.  Rutgers University Press, 2002, pp. 171-190.

13.   Özbek, Meral. “Arabesk Culture: A Case of Modernization and Popular Identity”.  In:  Rethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey. Eds. Sibel Bozdoğan, Reşat Kasaba.  Seattle:  U. of Washington Press, 1997, pp. 211-232.  ISBN-13: 978-0295975979.

14.  Sabuncu, Başar. “A Shanty in Istanbul”, tr. Nermin Menemencioğlu. In:  İbrahim and Other Plays: An Anthology of Modern Turkish Drama. Vol.1., eds. Talat Halman and Jayne Warner. Syracuse UP, 2008, pp. 213-270. ISBN-13: 978-0815608974.

15.  Saktanber, Ayşe. “Formation of a middle-class ethos and its quotidian:  revitalizing Islam in urban Turkey”. In: Space, Culture and Power: New Identities in Globalizing Cities, eds. Ayşe Öncü and Petra Weyland. Zed Books, 1997, pp. 140-156.  ISBN-13:  978-1856495035.

16.  White, Jenny. “Tin Town to Fanatics: Turkey’s Rural to Urban Migration from 1923 to the Present.”  In:  Turkey's Engagement with Modernity: Conflict and Change in the Twentieth Century.  Eds. Kerem Oktem, Celia Kerslake and Philip Robins. Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, pp. 425-442.  ISBN-13: 978-0230233140.

Course Films:

1.      The Horse (At). (1982)  Director:  Ali Özgentürk.

2.      I Saw the Sun (Güneşi Gördüm). (2009) Director:  Mahzun Kırmızıgül.

3.      Distant (Uzak). (2002) Director:  Nuri Bilge Ceylan.

4.      Segments of Crossing the Bridge:  The Sounds of Istanbul (2005). Director:  Fatih Akın.

5.      Muhsin Bey (1987). Director:  Yavuz Turgul.

 

MES 326 • Inspired By Istanbul

42157 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.202
(also listed as C L 323, TUR 372 )
show description

Description

One of the world’s oldest and loveliest cities, Istanbul – the city formerly known as Constantinople hasinspired countless poets, artists, musicians, diplomats & travel writers from Byzantine to modern times.Ottoman poets were so enamored by it that they invented a poetic genre called “şehr-engiz” (literally“city excitement”) to celebrate the natural & human beauties of the city. Orientalist writers, scholars &artists, too, found inspiration in Istanbul’s coffeehouses & on the banks of the Bosphorus, the straitconnecting the European & Asian sides of the city. Since 1923, when Istanbul officially ceased to be thepolitical capital of the new Republic of Turkey, Turkish & non-Turkish writers & artists alike havecontinued to produce a plethora of novels, poetry, & film scenarios set in & featuring Istanbul. In thiscourse, students will explore how key historical, social & cultural components of this constantlychanging metropolis have been recorded & interpreted in selected pieces of literature, music, art, & film.Class activities will include mini-lectures, several film viewings, performance reading, & discussion.

Texts

Sumner-Boyd, Hilary & John Freely. Strolling Through Istanbul: The Classic Guide to the City; Tekin,Latife. Berji Kristin: Tales from the Garbage Hills; Montagu, Lady Mary Wortley. The TurkishEmbassy Letters; Pamuk, Orhan. Istanbul: Memories and the City; “Inspired by Istanbul – Poems”packet. Contains poems in English by Ottoman, Turkish, European & American poets of the past sixcenturies; Tanpınar, Ahmet Hamdi. A Peace of Mind. Trans. Erdağ Göknar; Excerpts from: De Busbecq,Ogier Ghislain. The Turkish Letters of Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, Imperial Ambassador atConstantinople, 1554-1562: Translated from the Latin of the Elzevir Edition of 1663. Trans. EdwardSeymour Forster. Louisiana State University Press, 2005. (available on Blackboard)

Grading & Requirements

Active participation in class activities/discussions 15%Two (short answer/essay) tests 30%“Istanbul snaphot”(short oral presentation on an assigned topic from Istanbul’s cultural history ) 15%Final project on a self-chosen literary or cultural topic 40%

TUR 320L • Intermediate Turkish II

42485 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 210
show description

Course Description

This course builds communicative skills in modern Turkish through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities in and outside of class. The course focuses on Intermediate High level tasks and topics, which invovle daily life and material culture, as well as developing efficient reading strategies and listening skills. Class sessions will emphasize communication and comprehension skills, while introducing more advanced grammatical structures of the language and broadening vocabulary fields. Students will increase their knowledge of Turkish culture via short pieces of literature, music, film, art, and other realia. At the end of the semester students should expect to be able to communicate with others about their lives and interests, and understand texts on familiar topics. In addition to daily reading, listening, and writing homework, the course requires active participants in a group work in class, presentations, quizzes, and tests. Students should expect to spend two hours of homework daily. Students taking TUR 320L will be encouraged to participate in a weekly Turkish conversation hour and other Turkish cultural events organized during the course of the semester. Not open to native speakers of Turkish.

Prerequisite: TUR 320K with a letter grade of C or higher. 

Upon successful completion of Intermediate Turkish II, students will be able to

  • handle successfully most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situtations.
  • initiate, sustain, and close a general conversation with a number of strategies appropriate to a range of circumstances and topics, despite errors.
  • narrate with some accuracy autobiographical information, provide simple descriptions, and express some feelings.
  • sustain understanding over longer stretches of connected oral discourse on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places
  • understand main ideas and some facts from interactive informal discourse and linguistically simple connected aural texts on TV/film media, brief factual information on international news, and interviews where the subject matter is familiar and topical
  • read consistently with full understanding simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge
  • get some main ideas and information from texts at the next higher level (featuring description and narration), despite not fully understanding their structural complexity. 
  • take notes in some detail on familiar topics and respond in writing to personal questions. 
  • write simple letters, brief synopses and paraphrases, summaries of biographical data, work and school experience. 
  • describe and narrate in paragraphs, in which the use of cohesive elements is limited, but an expanded vocabulary base and good control of the basic structures is evident.
  • gain greater awareness and appreciation of and insight into the Turkish culture
  • become familiar with a number of Turkish short story writers
Course Materials
Oztopcu's A Complete Course for Beginners
Additional materials to be provided by instructor via Blackboard.
Requirements and Grading
Attendance and Particpation: 20%
Homework Assignments: 30%
Quizzes, Skits/Oral Presentations: 35%
Final Examination: 15%
May vary with instructor by semester. 

TUR 372 • Inspired By Istanbul

42495 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.202
(also listed as C L 323, MES 326 )
show description

Description

One of the world’s oldest and loveliest cities, Istanbul – the city formerly known as Constantinople hasinspired countless poets, artists, musicians, diplomats & travel writers from Byzantine to modern times.Ottoman poets were so enamored by it that they invented a poetic genre called “şehr-engiz” (literally“city excitement”) to celebrate the natural & human beauties of the city. Orientalist writers, scholars &artists, too, found inspiration in Istanbul’s coffeehouses & on the banks of the Bosphorus, the straitconnecting the European & Asian sides of the city. Since 1923, when Istanbul officially ceased to be thepolitical capital of the new Republic of Turkey, Turkish & non-Turkish writers & artists alike havecontinued to produce a plethora of novels, poetry, & film scenarios set in & featuring Istanbul. In thiscourse, students will explore how key historical, social & cultural components of this constantlychanging metropolis have been recorded & interpreted in selected pieces of literature, music, art, & film.Class activities will include mini-lectures, several film viewings, performance reading, & discussion.

Texts

Sumner-Boyd, Hilary & John Freely. Strolling Through Istanbul: The Classic Guide to the City; Tekin,Latife. Berji Kristin: Tales from the Garbage Hills; Montagu, Lady Mary Wortley. The TurkishEmbassy Letters; Pamuk, Orhan. Istanbul: Memories and the City; “Inspired by Istanbul – Poems”packet. Contains poems in English by Ottoman, Turkish, European & American poets of the past sixcenturies; Tanpınar, Ahmet Hamdi. A Peace of Mind. Trans. Erdağ Göknar; Excerpts from: De Busbecq,Ogier Ghislain. The Turkish Letters of Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, Imperial Ambassador atConstantinople, 1554-1562: Translated from the Latin of the Elzevir Edition of 1663. Trans. EdwardSeymour Forster. Louisiana State University Press, 2005. (available on Blackboard)

Grading & Requirements

Active participation in class activities/discussions 15%Two (short answer/essay) tests 30%“Istanbul snaphot”(short oral presentation on an assigned topic from Istanbul’s cultural history ) 15%Final project on a self-chosen literary or cultural topic 40%

MES 321K • Love In The East And West

41621 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CBA 4.342
(also listed as C L 323, TUR 372 )
show description

Participants in this course will examine various definitions and cultural representations of love, as expressed in major Eastern and Western literary works, and explore the question, "To what extent to conceptions and representations of love differ cross-culturally?" Class activities will include mini-lectures and performance reading, as well as comparative analysis and discussion of the portrayal of topics like "love and beauty," "love and separation," "love and madness," "love and marriage," ":love and war," "love and self-sacrifice," "love and death," and "love for the divine and love for the human". Participants will also, on occasion, be introduced to significant musical, visual art and cinematic forms/productions related to the poetry, prose and theatrical works read.

Texts

The story of Layla and Majnun by Nizami; Yusuf and Auleyha. An allegorical Romance; The Sorrows of Young Werther; Jamilia. Trans. J. Riordan; The Forty Rules of Love. A Book of Rumi.

 

Grading & Requirements

Participation in class activities/discussion  15%

Mid-term exam  25%

Final exam  25%

Final paper  35%

TUR 320K • Intermediate Turkish I

41975 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CBA 4.338
show description

This course builds communicative skills in modern Turkish through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities in and outside of class. The course focuses on Intermediate High and selected Advanced tasks and topics, which involve daily life and material culture, and guides students to develop efficient reading, listening and viewing strategies.  Class sessions will emphasize communication and comprehension skills, while offering opportunities to practice more advanced grammatical structures of the language and newly acquired vocabulary.  Students will increase their knowledge of Turkish culture via interaction with short pieces of literature, music, film, art, documentary video and other realia and by completing a variety of interview tasks with native speakers of Turkish.  At the end of the semester students should expect to be able to communicate with others about their lives and interests, and understand level-appropriate oral and written texts about issues of personal and community/social relevance.  In addition to daily reading, listening, and writing homework, the course requires active participation in group work in class, presentations, quizzes, and tests. Students should expect to spend two hours on homework daily.  Students taking TUR 320K will be encouraged to participate in a weekly Turkish conversation hour and other Turkish cultural events organized during the course of the semester. 

Prerequisite:  TUR 611C with a letter grade of C or higher (or via placement via successful performance on the DMES Turkish placement exam)

Texts:  Yeni Hittit 2 Yabancılar İçin Türkçe Ders Kitabı,  Yeni Hittit 2 Yabancılar İçin Türkçe Çalışma Kitabı, and Yeni Hittit 2 Yabancılar İçin Türkçe Ders CDsi (3rd ed., Ankara Universitesi TÖMER, Ankara Üniversitesi Basımevi, Ankara, 2010); and other class materials to be provided by the instructor via the course Blackboard

Grading & Requirements:  Attendance and Participation (20%), Homework (20%), Homework Correction (5%), Quizzes (25%), Skit (5%), Culture Portfolio (5%), Native Speaker Interview Tasks (5%), Final Exam (15%)

 

TUR 372 • Love In The East And West

41985 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CBA 4.342
(also listed as C L 323, MES 321K )
show description

Participants in this course will examine various definitions and cultural representations of love, as expressed in major Eastern and Western literary works, and explore the question, "To what extent to conceptions and representations of love differ cross-culturally?" Class activities will include mini-lectures and performance reading, as well as comparative analysis and discussion of the portrayal of topics like "love and beauty," "love and separation," "love and madness," "love and marriage," ":love and war," "love and self-sacrifice," "love and death," and "love for the divine and love for the human". Participants will also, on occasion, be introduced to significant musical, visual art and cinematic forms/productions related to the poetry, prose and theatrical works read.

Texts

The story of Layla and Majnun by Nizami; Yusuf and Auleyha. An allegorical Romance; The Sorrows of Young Werther; Jamilia. Trans. J. Riordan; The Forty Rules of Love. A Book of Rumi.

 

Grading & Requirements

Participation in class activities/discussion  15%

Mid-term exam  25%

Final exam  25%

Final paper  35%

bottom border