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Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

Lior Sternfeld

Lecturer Ph.D, The University of Texas at Austin

Lior Sternfeld

Contact

  • Office: CAL 407
  • Office Hours: T, TH 9-10
  • Campus Mail Code: F9400

Interests

Social History, Modern Iranian History, Left movements in the Middle East, Grassroots movements in the Middle East, Transnational Hisotry.

HEB 611C • Intensive Hebrew II

40560 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CAL 21
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Course Description

The course, which builds upon HEB 601C, emphasizes composition, comprehension and conversation in Modern Hebrew, and provides a segue to upper-division Hebrew courses such as Hebrew Grammar, Advanced Conversation and Composition, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature. Oral discourse is maintained at maximal level, and small group/individual instruction sessions supplement the regular class routine. Audio-visual materials are frequently used. Students write short papers, present topics to the class and lead class discussions. Active participation in class discussions is a decisive element in students' participation grade. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew.

Grading Policy

Participation 15%; Quizzes 30%; Homework 20% Presentations 5%; Midtem exam 10%; Final exam 20% May vary with instructor.

Texts

Information on texts will be provided by the instructor.

 

This course meets Monday through Friday. Please check the online course schedule for TTH meeting time and location.

MEL 321 • Jewish Histories Of Mid East

40780 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BEN 1.108
(also listed as HIS 364G, J S 364, MES 343, R S 358 )
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Jews have been part of Middle Eastern societies for thousands of years. They flourished at times, and endured hardships at others. They were part of every significant social and cultural transformation and the ever-evolving reality. Scholarship and conventional wisdoms often provide a problematic and ahistorical analysis that cemented reductive sentiments as History. Students will read and analyze primary sources and read critically secondary sources. We will delve into national historiographies and seek to find a nuanced narrative of Jewish histories of the region. We will also analyze popular culture products, such as documentaries, TV representations, and literature. One of the end results of the course will be creating an online wiki-style website that will be dedicated to Jewish histories of the Middle East. There will be a one-credit option for students to work with texts in Hebrew, Arabic or Persian. Texts Course packetGradingA 93-100, A- 90-92, B+ 87-89, B 83-86, B- 80-82, C+ 77-79, C 73-76, C- 70-72, D 60-69 F 0-59Class participation 25%, Website Entry Essay 25%= first draft: 10%, final draft: 15%, Presentation 10%, Final Paper (due at end of semester) 40%= proposal: 10%, paper: 30%

MES 343 • Jewish Histories Of Mid East

41100 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BEN 1.108
(also listed as HIS 364G, J S 364, MEL 321, R S 358 )
show description

Jews have been part of Middle Eastern societies for thousands of years. They flourished at times, and endured hardships at others. They were part of every significant social and cultural transformation and the ever-evolving reality. Scholarship and conventional wisdoms often provide a problematic and ahistorical analysis that cemented reductive sentiments as History. Students will read and analyze primary sources and read critically secondary sources. We will delve into national historiographies and seek to find a nuanced narrative of Jewish histories of the region. We will also analyze popular culture products, such as documentaries, TV representations, and literature. One of the end results of the course will be creating an online wiki-style website that will be dedicated to Jewish histories of the Middle East. There will be a one-credit option for students to work with texts in Hebrew, Arabic or Persian. Texts Course packetGradingA 93-100, A- 90-92, B+ 87-89, B 83-86, B- 80-82, C+ 77-79, C 73-76, C- 70-72, D 60-69 F 0-59Class participation 25%, Website Entry Essay 25%= first draft: 10%, final draft: 15%, Presentation 10%, Final Paper (due at end of semester) 40%= proposal: 10%, paper: 30%

HEB 601C • Intensive Hebrew I

41650 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.118
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This course is the first semester of intensive Hebrew language instruction.

Texts

Raizen, Modern Hebrew for Beginners

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

MES 343 • Iran, Iranian Jews, And Israel

42171 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 2.112
(also listed as HIS 364G, R S 358 )
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Provided the harsh rhetoric between the two countries, it may be forgotten that Iran is home to the biggest Jewish community in the Middle East outside Israel. Jewish existence there dates back to 2,700 years ago, and the relations between the country and its minority has known ups and downs. The picture became even more complicated when in 1948 Israel was established and Iran became its most important ally in the region. This course will introduce the history of the triangle made of Iran, its Jews, and Israel, from the nineteenth century to the present. We will examine central events in Iranian history and will see how it affected this relationship. Students will read and analyze primary sources and read critically secondary sources. We will also analyze popular culture products, such as documentaries, TV representations, and literature. One of the end results of the course will be creating an online wiki-style website that will be dedicated to Jewish histories of the Middle East. There will be a one-credit option for students to work with texts in Hebrew. Additional texts in Arabic and Persian will be provided for students who wish to explore them for research purposes.

Texts

A course packet will be available, and additional texts will be on Blackboard. Selected chapters from the following books:Levī, Ḥabīb. Comprehensive History of the Jews of Iran: The Outset of the Diaspora. Costa Mesa, CA: Mazda Publishers, 1999.Sarshar, Houman, ed. Esther’s Children : A Portrait of Iranian Jews. Beverly Hills  Calif.  ;Philadelphia: Center for Iranian Jewish Oral History ;;Jewish Publication Society, 2002.———. , ed. Jewish Communities of Iran: Entries on Judeo-Persian Communities Published by the Encyclopedia Iranica. New York: Encyclopedia Iranica Foundation, 2011.Tsadik, Daniel. Between Foreigners and Shi’is : Nineteenth-Century Iran and Its Jewish Minority. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2007.Yeroushalmi, David. The Jews of Iran in the Nineteenth Century Aspects of History, Community, and Culture. Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2009.

Grading

Class participation 25%Website Entry Essay 25% (first draft: 10%, final draft: 15%)Presentation 10%Final Paper (due at end of semester) 40% (proposal: 10%, paper: 30%)

A 93-100, A- 90-92, B+ 87-89, B 83-86, B- 80-82, C+ 77-79, C 73-76, C- 70-72, D 60-69, F 0-59

MES S301L • Intro M East: Adj/Chg Mod Tm

86425 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm PAR 302
(also listed as GOV S314, HIS S306N )
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DESCRIPTION

What is the modern Middle East? This course sets out to explore what constitutes the modern Middle East as it has developed from late 18th century to the present. The geographical scope includes the territories of the Ottoman Empire, Iran, and North Africa. We will discuss the emergence of Imperialism, Colonialism, Nationalism, Secularism, Postcolonialism, Religious Modernism, and Fundamentalism. We will identify the place of the Ottoman Legacy and the Arab-Israeli Conflict in shaping the modern Middle East. Other themes will revolve around the significance of the oil economy, Iran and the Middle East, and the "Arab Spring."

 

TEXTS/READINGS

James Gelvin, The Modern Middle East: A History, 3rd edition (NY: Oxford University Press, 2011).

Selected primary and secondary sources.

 

GRADING POLICY

Participation  20%

Two map quizzes  10%

Midterm exam  30%

Final Exam  40%

 

A 93-100, A- 90-92, B+ 87-90, B 83-86, B- 80-82, C+ 77-79, C 73-76, C- 70-72, D 60-69, F 0-59

 

MES F301K • Intro M East: Rel/Cul/Hist Fnd

86650 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as HIS F306K, R S F314 )
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This course surveys the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the end of the fifteenth century. Students will be introduced to basic aspects of the political, social, and cultural dimensions of Islamic civilization from Spain to Iran as they changed over time.

In the midst of mapping this broad view, we will focus our attention on how specific historical figures and events contributed to definitions of Islamic identity, community, and authority. Central themes include the emergence of Sunni and Shi`i identities, the relationship of Muslims and non-Muslims, and the unique material and intellectual contributions of Islamic civilization to world history and other societies.

MES S301L • Intro M East: Adj/Chg Mod Time

86930 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm JGB 2.218
(also listed as GOV S314, HIS S306N )
show description

DESCRIPTION

What is the modern Middle East? This course sets out to explore what constitutes the modern Middle East as it has developed from late 18th century to the present. The geographical scope includes the territories of the Ottoman Empire, Iran, and North Africa. We will discuss the emergence of Imperialism, Colonialism, Nationalism, Secularism, Postcolonialism, Religious Modernism, and Fundamentalism. We will identify the place of the Ottoman Legacy and the Arab-Israeli Conflict in shaping the modern Middle East. Other themes will revolve around the significance of the oil economy, Iran and the Middle East, and the "Arab Spring."

 

TEXTS/READINGS

James Gelvin, The Modern Middle East: A History, 3rd edition (NY: Oxford University Press, 2011).

Selected primary and secondary sources.

 

GRADING POLICY

Participation  20%

Two map quizzes  10%

Midterm exam  30%

Final Exam  40%

 

A 93-100, A- 90-92, B+ 87-90, B 83-86, B- 80-82, C+ 77-79, C 73-76, C- 70-72, D 60-69, F 0-59

 

Op-eds

http://www.juancole.com/2013/09/37620.html

http://www.juancole.com/2013/03/anniversary-prequel-sternfeld.html

http://www.juancole.com/2012/11/let-the-palestinians-have-their-kaf-tet-benovember-sternfeld.html

http://www.juancole.com/2012/11/wagging-the-dog-in-gaza-netanyahus-skirmish-of-fear-sternfeld.html

http://www.juancole.com/2012/04/the-paradox-of-israeli-politics-sternfeld.html

Reviews

"Before the Revolution- The Untold Story of the Israeli Community in Iran"

http://972mag.com/in-this-room-there-is-no-islam-the-shahs-special-relationship-with-irans-israeli-community/73273/

 

"Between Foreigners and Shi'is: Nineteenth-Century Iran and its Jewish Minority"

http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=36030

 

 

 

 

 

Articles

“Jewish-Iranian Identities in the Pahlavi Era.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 46:3, August 2014, 602-605.

Yahudiyan faramush shodeh-ye enqelab iran.Iran-Nameh 28:4, Winter 2013, 16-22

"Pahlavi Iran and Zionism: An Intellectual Elites Short Lived Love Affair with Israel

http://ajammc.com/2013/03/07/pahlavi-iran-and-zionism-an-intellectual-elites-short-lived-love-affair-with-israel/

 

The Jewish Hospital in Tehran during the 1979 Revolution

http://blogs.haaretz.co.il/sadna/132/

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