Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
mes masthead
Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

Hossein Haghshenas

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Hossein Haghshenas

Contact

MES 310 • Socl Transformatn Of Love/Rels

42480 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 214
(also listed as SOC 308 )
show description

“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24thSt.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu          

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

1) A research paper (4 – 5 pages) OR group paper (10 – 15 pages) on the subject of love, intimacy, relationships, or related issues. Course project and presentations constitute 25% of the final grade. The project is central to the course and the topic must be chosen by the student and/or the group and approved by the teaching assistant and the instructor.

2) Two exams 50% (each exam counts 25%)

3) Quizzes 9%

4) Class participation/group discussions 16%

 

MES 310 • Socl Transformatn Of Love/Rels

41650 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm BUR 224
(also listed as SOC 308 )
show description

“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24thSt.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu          

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

1) A research paper (4 – 5 pages) OR group paper (10 – 15 pages) on the subject of love, intimacy, relationships, or related issues. Course project and presentations constitute 25% of the final grade. The project is central to the course and the topic must be chosen by the student and/or the group and approved by the teaching assistant and the instructor.

2) Two exams 50% (each exam counts 25%)

3) Quizzes 9%

4) Class participation/group discussions 16%

MES 310 • Socl Transformatn Of Love/Rels

42040 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BUR 224
(also listed as SOC 308 )
show description

“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 

OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 

Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24thSt.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu

            

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

MES 310 • Socl Transformatn Of Love/Rels

42165 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1200-100pm GEA 114
(also listed as SOC 308 )
show description

Social Transformation of Love and Relationships

SOC. 308 Unique # 46270; MES 310 Unique # 42165

Time and Place: MWF 12:00-1:00 Location: GEA 114

Spring 2010

                                                                       

Instructor: Mehdi Haghshenas                       

Office Hours: MW 11:00 – 11:50 & by appt. (Burdine 539)

Phone: 232-8064

Colleague: Sharon Avital                       

Office and Office Hours:W:2:00-4:00 ( BUR 554)

Email: avitalsharon.shineon@gmail.com

 

“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 

OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 

Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu

             

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 

 

 

Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

 

Withdrawals:  As we journey into this course, if you are unsure of your status (especially if your grades are below average), please let us assist you to clarify your position. With all respect, if you decide to withdraw, do not miss the enforced deadline.

 

Accommodations: Students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify us within the first two weeks of class by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) Office. For more information, please call 471-6259(voice) or 232-2937 (video phone). http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

 

Academic Integrity: During the coursework, you should maintain a high standard of individual honor in your scholastic work. Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and / or dismissal from the University.

 

Religious Holy Days: If you miss the class for the observance of a religious holy day, please inform the instructor and your TA as far in advance.

 

ASSIGNED READINGS: SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY THE DATES INDICATED. IF YOU CANNOT REGULARLY MAKE IT TO THIS CLASS, OR CANNOT READ THE ARTICLES FOR THE DATES THAT ARE ASSIGNED, DO NOT TAKE THIS CLASS.

 

MAKE UP EXAMS: Will not be given without prior notice and a written excuse from a physician or other verified emergency situation. Failure to take a scheduled examination without making prior arrangements will result in an automatic zero for that exam.

 

PAPER & PRESENTATION: The paper is to be typed only with 12 pt. Times or Courier font, 1.5 line spacing format, 1 to 1.25 inch margins, and numbered pages.   More content and formatting guidelines will be provided closer to the due date.  Late papers will not be accepted.  If a paper is not turned in by the assigned date, the grade will automatically be an ‘F’. The oral Presentation is required and is part of the graded portion of the assignment. You must limit your presentation to not more than 15 minutes. For affective presentation, you may use power point, transparencies, short films, audio aids, and/or other creative tools.

 

**No emailed assignments or papers will be accepted without prior arrangement having been made with the TA.

 

** Classroom civility: With all respect, please turn off your cell phones and do not read/eat/wearing earphones/and work on your other class assignments while in class.

TEST DATES:

FIRST EXAM:            MARCH 10

SECOND EXAM:             MAY 5

Paper Due:                        March 24

 

Course Evaluation

 

1)    A research paper (4 – 5 pages) OR group paper (10 – 15 pages) on the subject of love, intimacy, relationships, or related issues. Course project and presentations constitute 25% of the final grade. The project is central to the course and the topic must be chosen by the student and/or the group and approved by the teaching assistant and the instructor.

2)    Two exams 50% (each exam counts 25%).

3)    Quizzes 9%.

4)    Class participation and group discussions 16%.

 

Course Schedule and Reading Assignments

Please pay attention to the course schedule and complete reading assignments before coming to class.

 

TOPICS and READINGS:

January 20th: Introduction to Course description, objectives, overview of readings and assignments.

 

January 22 /25: Concepts and Perspectives; Biology of Love

Readings:

  • David Buss, “The Evolutionary Biology of Love,”
  • Helen Fisher, “The Nature and Evolutionary of Romantic Love,”
  • Helen Fisher et. al “Defining the Brain System of Lust, Romantic Attraction and Attachment”

 

January 27 /29; Feb 1 The mythological and spiritual aspects of love;

Form and Formless (lecture)

 

Feb 1/3: Theories of Love; Types of Love; Features of Romantic Love

Readings:

  • Anne. E. Beall & R.J. Sternberg, “The Social Construction of Love,”
  • R. Sternberg, “A Triangular Theory of Love,”
  • P. R. Shaver et al, “Is Love a Basic Emotion?”
  • Nathaniel Branden, “ A Vision of Romantic Love,”
  • Phyllis Krystal, “What is Love,”

 

February 5th: Sex and love in early Eastern civilizations: Innana, love, and the pairs of opposite

 

 

Readings:

  • T. Jacobson, from Sumerian poetry in translation: “Introduction; and Royal   Love Songs, “

 

February 8/10: Sex and love in ancient Eastern and Western civilizations: the Egyptians, the Greeks, and the Romans. Plato’s Symposium.

Readings:

  • Singer, “Concept of Love in the West,”
  • L. Stone, “Passionate Attachments in the West in Historical Perspective,”
  • Plato’s ‘Symposium’
  • Sappho, poems
  • Ovid, “the art of love,”

 

February 12/15 Plato’s symposium [Group Discussion 1]

 

February 17/19: Love in the Middle Ages: The

Persian tale of Khosrow and Shirin; and the Western courtly love of Tristan and Isolde: Pathways to the modern era.

Readings:

  • Nizami, “Khosrow and Shirin,”           
  • J. Campbell, "A Noble Heart, the Courtly Love of Tristan and Isolde:,"
  • A. Capellanus, “On Love.”

 

FEBRUARY 22nd: paper discussion

 

February 24/26: Love and capitalism—private lives and public order: the intimate relationships in American social history.

                                    [Group Discussion 2]

Readings:

  • E. From, " Love and Economic Competition,"
  • K. Marx and F. Engels, “Women in Capitalist Society,”
  • H. Gadlin, “Private Lives & Public Order: A Critical View of the History of Intimate Relations in the United States,”
  • Ann Swidler, “Love & Adulthood in American Culture,”

 

February Mar 1--8: Topic continues. Love, intimacy, Dating, and Sexuality in Modern societies. College women and mating in the U.S. (EXAM REVIEW)

Readings:           

  • Beth Bailey, “Sexual Revolution(s),”
  • Mary Evans, “The Language of Love,”
  • Barbara Risman and p. Schwartz, “After the sexual revolution: gender politics in the teen dating” *(BB)
  • Ghadal al-Samman, “The Sexual Revolution and the Total Revolution,”
  • Giddens, "Ch. 1,3,4"
  • College Women and Dating. N. Glenn and E. Marquardt, “Hooking up, Hanging out, and Hoping for Mr. Right: college women on dating and mating today”

 

March 9th: FIRST EXAM

March 12th: Selective topic: College women and mating in the U.S.

 

March 15th – 19th: Spring Break

March 22nd  – 26th:  Love and marriage beyond western culture: Collectivistic and individualistic societies; comparative studies of personal choice and arranged marriage.

Readings:

  • W.R. Jankowiak, “A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Romantic Love,”
  • K. Dion and K. L. Dion, “Cultural Perspectives on Romantic Love,”
  • B. B. Ingoldsby, “Mate Selection and Marriage Around the World,”
  • W. Jankowiak , "Romantic Passion in the People’s Republic of China,"
  • Stephanie Coontz: “The Radical Idea of Marrying for Love
  • Johanna Lessinger, Asian Indian Marriages----Arranged, Semi-Arranged or          Based on Love?”
  • Balmurli Natarajan, Notes Towards a (Re)Arranged of Love,”

 

March 26th : Paper Due

 

March 29 /31tst: Intercultural and Interracial relationships [PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]

Readings:

  • L. Page, "Denmark’s a Prison,"
  • N. Egan, "Crossing Cultures: the Story of a Chinese Man and an American Woman,"
  • Egon Mayer, “Two can make a Revolution”
  • D. S. Wilson & C.K. Jacobson, "White Attitudes Towards Black and White Interracial Marriage,"
  • Zhenchao Qian, “Breaking the last taboo: interracial marriage in America” *(BB)
  • Shirley A. Hill, “Black Intimacy---Love, Sex, and Relationships---the Pursuit of Intimacy”

 

April 2/5: Self Identity and Intimacy in the Middle

 [PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]

Readings:

  • Nawa Al-Sadawi, “Growing Up Female in Egypt,”
  • W. N. Njambi and W.E. O’Brien, “Revisiting Woman-Woman Marriage”
  • Mahnaz Kousha, “A Man or a Woman? Which is Better Off?
  • Simin Bihbihani, “Oh, I Made Love,”

 

April 7th: Selective topic: Objectification and gender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 9/12: Gender, love, and intimacy [GROUP DISCUSSION 3 & PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]

 

Readings:

  • S. de Beauvoir, "The Second Sex,"
  • F.M. Cancian, “The Feminization of Love”
  • M. Kimmel, “Masculinity as Homophobia: Fear, Shame, and Silence in the Construction of Gender Identity,”
  • J.W. Sattel, “The Inexpressive Male:  Tragedy or Sexual Politics”
  • J. Wood, “Gendered Close Relationships”
  • Judith Levine, “ What is Wanting? Gender, Equality, and Desire,”
  • L. Rubin, “The Approach-Avoidance Dance:  Men, Women, and Intimacy

                 

 

April 14th- - 16th [PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]

April 19th- - 23th [PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]                                   

 

April 26-30 : Meeting the shadow: self and love (GROUP DISCUSSION 4) and presentations.

Readings:

  • R. C. Solomon, "The Self in Love,"
  • D. Schnarch,       “Differentiation: Developing a Self–in-Relationship,”
  • Ann Swidler, ch. 7 “Ties That Do Not Bind”
  • J. Cherlin, I’m o.k., you’re selfish,”
  • R. Bly, "The Long Bag We Drag Behind Us,"
  • C. Whitmont, “The Evolution of the Shadow,             
  • M. Scott Peck, "Healing Human Evil,"
  • Ken Wilber, “Taking Responsibility for Your Shadow,”
  • R. Bly, "Eating the Shadow,"             

 

May 3rd : Love and Violence: Searching for the New

Eves and the New Adams. [PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]

EXAM REVIEW

Readings:

  • F.S. Christopher and S. A. Lloyd, “Physical & Sexual Aggression in Relationships,”
  • Neil S. Jacobson & J.M. Gottman, “Anatomy of a Violent Relationships,”
  • Riane T. Eisler, "The New Eves and the New Adams: The Courage to Question and to Choose, and the Power to Love,"
  • Elaine Hatfield, “From Male Supremacy to Gender Equality,”

 

May 5th:            SECOND EXAM

 

May 7th            Selective topic

 

 

 

 

 

 

bottom border