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Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

Mohammad Ghanoonparvar

Professor Emeritus Ph.D., University of Texas- Austtin

Professor
Mohammad Ghanoonparvar

Contact

Biography

M. R. Ghanoonparvar is Professor of Persian and Comparative Literature and Persian Language at The University of Texas at Austin.  Ghanoonparvar has also taught at the University of Isfahan, the University of Virginia, and the University of Arizona and was a Rockefeller Fellow at the University of Michigan.  He has published widely on Persian literature and culture in both English and Persian and is the author of Prophets of Doom: Literature as a Socio-Political Phenomenon in Modern Iran (1984), In a Persian Mirror: Images of the West and Westerners in Iranian Fiction (1993), Translating the Garden (2001), Reading Chubak (2005), and Persian Cuisine: Traditional, Regional and Modern Foods (2006).  His translations include Jalal Al-e Ahmad’s By the Pen, Sadeq Chubak’s The Patient Stone, Simin Daneshvar’s Savushun, Ahmad Kasravi's On Islam and Shi'ism, Sadeq Hedayat’s The Myth of Creation. Davud Ghaffarzadegan's Fortune Told in Blood, and Mohammad Reza Bayrami's The Tales of Sabalan; his edited volumes include Iranian Drama: An Anthology, In Transition:  Essays on Culture and Identity in Middle Eastern Societies, Gholamhoseyn Sa’edi’s Othello in Wonderland and Mirror-Polishing Storytellers, and Moniru Ravanipur’s Satan Stones and Kanizu.  He was the recipient of the 2008 Lois Roth Prize for Literary Translation.  His most recent book is The Neighbor Says: Letters of Nima Yushij and the Philosophy of Modern Persian Poetry (2009) and his forthcoming books include Iranian Films and Persian Fiction, Literary Diseases in Persian Literature, and a translation of Bahram Beyza'i's Memoirs of the Actor in a Supporting Role.   

 

 

Interests

20th century Persian literature; comparative literary history and criticism; methodology and practice of literary translation

MES 386 • Persian Novel

42000 • Spring 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as PRS 384C )
show description

In this course, we will examine the development of the modern Persian novel from its inception in the late 19th century through the 21st century as a genre that was party inspired by travel literature that was the dominant genre in Iran in the 19th century and partly by the works of European as well as American novelists. The increasing number of translations of novels, initially those of French, British, German, and Russian writers and later the works of major American novelists gradually brought about a revolutionary change in Persian fiction, to the extent that in 1945 one prominent literary scholar called the 20th century the Age of Fiction in Persian literature, in which poetry had previously occupied center stage. We will study the development of various trends in Persian fiction, including historical and romance novels in the 1920s through 1940s; the emulation of the innovations and experimentation of prose styles and narrative voice in the works of writers such as James Joyce, Virginia Wolfe, Ernest Hemingway, and William Faulkner in the 1950s; the mainstream social realist novels countered by the Isfahan School, who advocated the French nouveau roman in the 1960s and 1970s; and magic realism, particularly in the wake of the Islamic Revolution and the Iran-Iraq war.

Texts

Zeynolabedin Maragheh'i's Travel Memoirs of Ebrahim Beyg, Sadeg Hedayat's The Blind Owl, Bozorg Alavi's Her Eyes, Sadeq Chubak's The Patient Stone, Jalal Al-e Ahmad's N and the Pen, Simin Daneshver's Savushun, Gholamhoseyn Sa'edi's The Canon, Hushang Golshiri's Prince Ehtejab, Ahmad Mahmoud's The Neighbors, Esmail Fassih's Sorraya in a Coma, Mahmud Dowlatabadi's Missing Soluch, Mohammad Reza Bayrami's The Tales of Sabalan, Ahmad Dehqan's Journey to Heading 270 Degrees, Davud Ghaffarzadegan's Fortune Told in Blood, Ja'far Modarres-Sadeqi's Horse's Head, and Shahrnush Parsipur's Women Without Men.

Grading: 

Two analytical papers, 60%; Four class presentations and participation, 40%. 

PRS 322L • Intmed Grad Lang Instructn II

42095 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 4.120
(also listed as PRS 381L )
show description

PRS 322L is an intermediate Persian language course which continues to focus on increasing proficiency in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in Persian, as well as developing increased skills and cultural literacy. Students should expect extensive reading as well as practice in self-expression through writing, both of which require approximately three hours of outside preparation for each class. Our teaching philosophy is based on the communicative approach that consists of student-centered, performance-based, and context-oriented language teaching. Therefore, participation is an integral part of the class. You must speak Persian in the class at all times unless given explicit permission by the instructor to use English. Not open to native speakers or heritage learners of Persian.

By the end of this course you will be able to:

1. Speak at length about familiar topics in Modern Persian,

2. Understand complex texts on familiar topics, especially those from news media and on-line sources,

3. Understand authentic materials by identifying the main ideas and focusing on the information within reach,

4. Listen to short news excerpts and comprehend the main points,

5. Writing essays and critically engage topics related to the class,

6. Pronounce Persian words with accuracy,

7. A broader understanding of how to engage in the historical and cultural contexts in which Persian is used, and

8. Expanded your languge capabilities and skills for life-long learning.

 

Course Materials

To be provided by instructor.

 

Course Requirements and Grading

Attendance & Participation 15%

Weeklywritingassignments 30%

Assigment Corrections 10%

Periodical Quizes (3x) 15%

Presentations (2x) 10%

Final Exam Project 15%

Oral Profeciency Test 5%

May vary by instructor each semester.

PRS 381L • Intmed Grad Lang Instructn II

42125 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 4.120
(also listed as PRS 322L )
show description

PRS 322L is an intermediate Persian language course which continues to focus on increasing proficiency in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in Persian, as well as developing increased skills and cultural literacy. Students should expect extensive reading as well as practice in self-expression through writing, both of which require approximately three hours of outside preparation for each class. Our teaching philosophy is based on the communicative approach that consists of student-centered, performance-based, and context-oriented language teaching. Therefore, participation is an integral part of the class. You must speak Persian in the class at all times unless given explicit permission by the instructor to use English. Not open to native speakers or heritage learners of Persian.

By the end of this course you will be able to:

1. Speak at length about familiar topics in Modern Persian,

2. Understand complex texts on familiar topics, especially those from news media and on-line sources,

3. Understand authentic materials by identifying the main ideas and focusing on the information within reach,

4. Listen to short news excerpts and comprehend the main points,

5. Writing essays and critically engage topics related to the class,

6. Pronounce Persian words with accuracy,

7. A broader understanding of how to engage in the historical and cultural contexts in which Persian is used, and

8. Expanded your languge capabilities and skills for life-long learning.

 

Course Materials

To be provided by instructor.

 

Course Requirements and Grading

Attendance & Participation 15%

Weeklywritingassignments 30%

Assigment Corrections 10%

Periodical Quizes (3x) 15%

Presentations (2x) 10%

Final Exam Project 15%

Oral Profeciency Test 5%

May vary by instructor each semester.

PRS 384C • Persian Novel

42130 • Spring 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as MES 386 )
show description

In this course, we will examine the development of the modern Persian novel from its inception in the late 19th century through the 21st century as a genre that was party inspired by travel literature that was the dominant genre in Iran in the 19th century and partly by the works of European as well as American novelists. The increasing number of translations of novels, initially those of French, British, German, and Russian writers and later the works of major American novelists gradually brought about a revolutionary change in Persian fiction, to the extent that in 1945 one prominent literary scholar called the 20th century the Age of Fiction in Persian literature, in which poetry had previously occupied center stage. We will study the development of various trends in Persian fiction, including historical and romance novels in the 1920s through 1940s; the emulation of the innovations and experimentation of prose styles and narrative voice in the works of writers such as James Joyce, Virginia Wolfe, Ernest Hemingway, and William Faulkner in the 1950s; the mainstream social realist novels countered by the Isfahan School, who advocated the French nouveau roman in the 1960s and 1970s; and magic realism, particularly in the wake of the Islamic Revolution and the Iran-Iraq war.

Texts

Zeynolabedin Maragheh'i's Travel Memoirs of Ebrahim Beyg, Sadeg Hedayat's The Blind Owl, Bozorg Alavi's Her Eyes, Sadeq Chubak's The Patient Stone, Jalal Al-e Ahmad's N and the Pen, Simin Daneshver's Savushun, Gholamhoseyn Sa'edi's The Canon, Hushang Golshiri's Prince Ehtejab, Ahmad Mahmoud's The Neighbors, Esmail Fassih's Sorraya in a Coma, Mahmud Dowlatabadi's Missing Soluch, Mohammad Reza Bayrami's The Tales of Sabalan, Ahmad Dehqan's Journey to Heading 270 Degrees, Davud Ghaffarzadegan's Fortune Told in Blood, Ja'far Modarres-Sadeqi's Horse's Head, and Shahrnush Parsipur's Women Without Men.

Grading: 

Two analytical papers, 60%; Four class presentations and participation, 40%. 

MEL 321 • Iranian Cinema

41600 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 1
(also listed as MES 342 )
show description

The worldwide success of Iranian films in the past decade has garnered an international reputation for Iranian filmmakers and respect for Iranian cinema. While the image of the Iranian government has been in general viewed negatively, Iranian filmmakers have helped the formation of a more positive image of Iran and its people, especially in the mind of moviegoers in other countries. The New Wave in Iranian Cinema will also be compared with Italian neorealism and French New Wave. We will view and examine the works of major Iranian directors, including Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Daryush Mahrju'i, Amir Naderi, Ali Hatami, Puran Derakhshandeh, Bahram Beyza'i, Marziyeh Meshkini, Ebrahim Mokhtari, and Tahmineh Milani in the context of artistic, socio-political, economic, and cultural developments as well as in terms of various aspects of globalization. Texts/Readings

Dabashi, Hamid, Close Up: Iranian Cinema, Past Present, and Future, New York: Verso Books, 2001

Sadr, Hamid Reza, Iranian Cinema: A Political History, London: I.B. Tauris and Co., 2006.

Tapper, Richard, The New Iranian Cinema: Politics, Representation and Identity, London: I. B. Tauris and Co., 2002.

Grading Policy

In order to earn a grade of C-, C, or C+, students are required to attend all classes, read all required materials, write the weekly assignments, make a 15 minute presentation, and write a five-page final paper. In order to earn a grade of B-, B, or B+, students are reuired to attend all classes, read all required materials, write the weekly assignments, make two thirty-minute presentations, and write a five-page mid-term and a five-page final paper. In order to earn a grade of A- or A, students are required to attend all classes, read all required materials, write the weekly assignments, make two one-hour presentations, and write a twelve-page mid-term and a twelve-page final paper.

MES 342 • Iranian Cinema

41707 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 1
(also listed as MEL 321 )
show description

The worldwide success of Iranian films in the past decade has garnered an international reputation for Iranian filmmakers and respect for Iranian cinema. While the image of the Iranian government has been in general viewed negatively, Iranian filmmakers have helped the formation of a more positive image of Iran and its people, especially in the mind of moviegoers in other countries. The New Wave in Iranian Cinema will also be compared with Italian neorealism and French New Wave. We will view and examine the works of major Iranian directors, including Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Daryush Mahrju'i, Amir Naderi, Ali Hatami, Puran Derakhshandeh, Bahram Beyza'i, Marziyeh Meshkini, Ebrahim Mokhtari, and Tahmineh Milani in the context of artistic, socio-political, economic, and cultural developments as well as in terms of various aspects of globalization. Texts/Readings

Dabashi, Hamid, Close Up: Iranian Cinema, Past Present, and Future, New York: Verso Books, 2001

Sadr, Hamid Reza, Iranian Cinema: A Political History, London: I.B. Tauris and Co., 2006.

Tapper, Richard, The New Iranian Cinema: Politics, Representation and Identity, London: I. B. Tauris and Co., 2002.

Grading Policy

In order to earn a grade of C-, C, or C+, students are required to attend all classes, read all required materials, write the weekly assignments, make a 15 minute presentation, and write a five-page final paper. In order to earn a grade of B-, B, or B+, students are reuired to attend all classes, read all required materials, write the weekly assignments, make two thirty-minute presentations, and write a five-page mid-term and a five-page final paper. In order to earn a grade of A- or A, students are required to attend all classes, read all required materials, write the weekly assignments, make two one-hour presentations, and write a twelve-page mid-term and a twelve-page final paper.

MES 386 • Prs Prose Nonfict, Past/Pres

41805 • Fall 2012
Meets W 1200pm-300pm CAL 22
show description

This course is a survey of Persian prose non-fiction from the 10th to the 21st century with emphasis on selections written in the 19th through 21st centuries.  Selections include a variety of historical and polemic texts, literary criticism, social criticism, memoirs, travel accounts, and essays written in the past two centuries.  Particular attention will be paid to writing style in these works.  The syllabus will be modified to accommodate students' specific needs and interests.

The texts, which include A Thousand Years of Persian Prose, selected essays and polemical writings written in the past two centuries, and material of interest to students, will be made available in pdf or photocopies.

Grading Policy 

Two analytical papers, 60%; four class presentations and participation, 40%.  Final grade will be based on chart depending on the quality of research, theoretical analysis, and creativity of presentations and papers.

MES 324K • Iranian Literature In Exile

41550 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 306
(also listed as PRS 361 )
show description

The 1978-79 Islamic Revolution in Iran resulted in the transplantation of a number of Iranian writers to other countries including the United States. In terms of the subject matter, worldview, style, and other aspects, the works of these writers who write in English have been influenced by their new cultural and linguistic environment in the United States. While the first part of the course will focus on the work of an older generation of Iranian-American writers who had migrated to the United States prior to the Islamic Revolution and used English as their second language in their stories, the second part will be devoted to the writing of an increasing number of younger Iranian-American authors, most of whom were born in the United States and consider English as their native tongue.  

 

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

MES 386 • The Self/West Othr Iranian Lit

41619 • Fall 2011
Meets W 1200pm-300pm BEN 1.106
show description

Similar to people in other cultures, in the course of many centuries, Iranians have defined their "self" vis-à-vis an "other." In their mythological history as described in Ferdowsi's Shahnameh, the Other appears as the Turanians, while in recorded history, it has consisted of the Greeks, the Arabs, and the Mongols, among others, and in recent centuries the Westerners, whether Europeans or Americans.  In this course, through various cultural texts including films, prose fiction, plays, memoirs, music and music videos, we will explore questions pertaining to definitions of identity, perceptions and presentations of the "self" and the Western "other" in Persian cultural products and the changes and evolution of such perceptions and presentations, especially from the modernity in Iran in the 19th century to the age of globalization in the 21st century.  Taught in English.  Additional weekly sessions will be scheduled for Persian Studies students.

 

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

PRS 361 • Iranian Literature In Exile

41710 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 306
(also listed as MES 324K )
show description

The 1978-79 Islamic Revolution in Iran resulted in the transplantation of a number of Iranian writers to other countries including the United States. In terms of the subject matter, worldview, style, and other aspects, the works of these writers who write in English have been influenced by their new cultural and linguistic environment in the United States. While the first part of the course will focus on the work of an older generation of Iranian-American writers who had migrated to the United States prior to the Islamic Revolution and used English as their second language in their stories, the second part will be devoted to the writing of an increasing number of younger Iranian-American authors, most of whom were born in the United States and consider English as their native tongue.  

 

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

MES 324K • Iranian Drama

41665 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 1
(also listed as PRS 361 )
show description

This course follows the development of Iranian drama from the 19th through the 20th century.  Representative plays from the Qajar, Constitutional, Pahlavi and post-Islamic Revolutionary periods are examined for their socio-cultural content and aesthetic value in the light of traditional performing arts in Iran.  Attention is also be paid to the influences of traditional Iranian performing art forms, such as ta'ziyeh, ruhowzi, as well as Western theater on this drama.  The works of such notable playwrights as Fath'ali Akhundzadeh, Bahram Beyza'i, Bahman Forsi, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Hasan Moghaddam, Abbas Na'lbandiyan, Akbar Radi, Gholamhoseyn Sa'edi, Mirza Aqa Tabrizi, Faramarz Talebi, and Mohsen Yalfani will comprise the basic reading component of the course.     

 

Texts:

M. R. Ghanoonparvar & John Green, eds., Iranian Drama:  An Anthology; M. R. Ghanoonparvar, ed., 'Othello in Wonderland' 'Mirror-Polishing Storytellers', Hamid Dabashi, ed., Theater of Diaspora & bahram Beyzai:  Memoirs of the Actor in a Supporting Role.

 

Grading:

Two papers  60%

Weekly reports  20%

Presentations and class participation  20%

 

MES 381 • Mid Eastern Travel Literature

41705 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as PRS 384C )
show description

With an overview of the history of travel memoirs in the ME the general focus of this course is an examination of such writing from the late 18thC through the present century.   In recent years, the written accounts of travelers have generally been sources, particularly for historians, for the reconstruction of the social & political history of particular periods.  As long narratives, these works can also be considered the precursors of modern prose fiction, especially novels, since in their work, these travelers often reconstract the societies & cultures they visit on the basis of their own preconceived notions, & at times as alien worlds comprised of strange people & exotic customs.  From a literary critical perspective, the questions that will be explored include:  Do these works follow any particular structural form(s), and if they do, what are they? Are these accounts factual or mostly fictional, & what has been the impact of travel memoirs from previous centuries on the development of modern fiction writing & the novel in various Middle Eastern literatures? Students who have knowledge of Arabic, Hebrew or Persian may read the primary soruce material in the original language.

 

Texts:

Course Packet.

 

Grading:

Two analytical papers  60%

Class presentation and participation  40%

 

PRS 361 • Iranian Drama

41845 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 1
(also listed as MES 324K )
show description

This course follows the development of Iranian drama from the 19th through the 20th century.  Representative plays from the Qajar, Constitutional, Pahlavi and post-Islamic Revolutionary periods are examined for their socio-cultural content and aesthetic value in the light of traditional performing arts in Iran.  Attention is also be paid to the influences of traditional Iranian performing art forms, such as ta'ziyeh, ruhowzi, as well as Western theater on this drama.  The works of such notable playwrights as Fath'ali Akhundzadeh, Bahram Beyza'i, Bahman Forsi, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Hasan Moghaddam, Abbas Na'lbandiyan, Akbar Radi, Gholamhoseyn Sa'edi, Mirza Aqa Tabrizi, Faramarz Talebi, and Mohsen Yalfani will comprise the basic reading component of the course.     

 

Texts:

M. R. Ghanoonparvar & John Green, eds., Iranian Drama:  An Anthology; M. R. Ghanoonparvar, ed., 'Othello in Wonderland' 'Mirror-Polishing Storytellers', Hamid Dabashi, ed., Theater of Diaspora & bahram Beyzai:  Memoirs of the Actor in a Supporting Role.

 

Grading:

Two papers  60%

Weekly reports  20%

Presentations and class participation  20%

 

PRS 384C • Mid Eastern Travel Literature

41865 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as MES 381 )
show description

With an overview of the history of travel memoirs in the ME the general focus of this course is an examination of such writing from the late 18thC through the present century.   In recent years, the written accounts of travelers have generally been sources, particularly for historians, for the reconstruction of the social & political history of particular periods.  As long narratives, these works can also be considered the precursors of modern prose fiction, especially novels, since in their work, these travelers often reconstract the societies & cultures they visit on the basis of their own preconceived notions, & at times as alien worlds comprised of strange people & exotic customs.  From a literary critical perspective, the questions that will be explored include:  Do these works follow any particular structural form(s), and if they do, what are they? Are these accounts factual or mostly fictional, & what has been the impact of travel memoirs from previous centuries on the development of modern fiction writing & the novel in various Middle Eastern literatures? Students who have knowledge of Arabic, Hebrew or Persian may read the primary soruce material in the original language.

 

Texts:

Course Packet.

 

Grading:

Two analytical papers  60%

Class presentation and participation  40%

 

PRS 322L • Third-Year Persian II

42425 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm MEZ 2.202
show description

PRS 322L is an intermediate Persian language course which continues to focus on increasing proficiency in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in Persian, as well as developing increased skills and cultural literacy. Students should expect extensive reading as well as practice in self-expression through writing, both of which require approximately three hours of outside preparation for each class. Our teaching philosophy is based on the communicative approach that consists of student-centered, performance-based, and context-oriented language teaching. Therefore, participation is an integral part of the class. You must speak Persian in the class at all times unless given explicit permission by the instructor to use English. Not open to native speakers or heritage learners of Persian.

By the end of this course you will be able to:

1. Speak at length about familiar topics in Modern Persian,

2. Understand complex texts on familiar topics, especially those from news media and on-line sources,

3. Understand authentic materials by identifying the main ideas and focusing on the information within reach,

4. Listen to short news excerpts and comprehend the main points,

5. Writing essays and critically engage topics related to the class,

6. Pronounce Persian words with accuracy,

7. A broader understanding of how to engage in the historical and cultural

contexts in which Persian is used, and

8. Expanded your languge capabilities and skills for life-long learning.

 

Course Materials

To be provided by instructor.

 

Course Requirements and Grading

Attendance & Participation 15%

Weeklywritingassignments 30%

Assigment Corrections 10%

Periodical Quizes (3x) 15%

Presentations (2x) 10%

Final Exam Project 15%

Oral Profeciency Test 5%

May vary by instructor each semester.

 

PRS 322K • Third-Year Persian I

42605 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 MEZ 1.206
show description

This intermediate Persian language proficiency course is designed for students who have completed Persian 611C or 612C or have been assigned to the class as a result of a DMES placement test.  The material for this course will consist mainly of articles, stories and audio-visual materials from the internet. Texts will be supplemented with vocabulary lists and exercises and explanations of cultural aspects of the texts. The reading material will also be made available in audio format. The course aims to expand active vocabulary to approximately 1000 words by the end of the semester and to help students reach an intermediate high proficiency in Persian. Students should expect three hours of class preparation for each class hour of reading, listening, and writing. Daily homework assignments are corrected & discussed with students on a regular basis.

Texts

To be provided by instructor.

Grading

To be provided by instructor.

PRS 322L • Third-Year Persian II

41670 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm CMA A3.108
show description

PRS 322L is an intermediate Persian language course which continues to focus on increasing proficiency in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in Persian, as well as developing increased skills and cultural literacy. Students should expect extensive reading as well as practice in self-expression through writing, both of which require approximately three hours of outside preparation for each class. Our teaching philosophy is based on the communicative approach that consists of student-centered, performance-based, and context-oriented language teaching. Therefore, participation is an integral part of the class. You must speak Persian in the class at all times unless given explicit permission by the instructor to use English. Not open to native speakers or heritage learners of Persian.

By the end of this course you will be able to:

1. Speak at length about familiar topics in Modern Persian,

2. Understand complex texts on familiar topics, especially those from news media and on-line sources,

3. Understand authentic materials by identifying the main ideas and focusing on the information within reach,

4. Listen to short news excerpts and comprehend the main points,

5. Writing essays and critically engage topics related to the class,

6. Pronounce Persian words with accuracy,

7. A broader understanding of how to engage in the historical and cultural

contexts in which Persian is used, and

8. Expanded your languge capabilities and skills for life-long learning.

 

Course Materials

To be provided by instructor.

 

Course Requirements and Grading

Attendance & Participation 15%

Weeklywritingassignments 30%

Assigment Corrections 10%

Periodical Quizes (3x) 15%

Presentations (2x) 10%

Final Exam Project 15%

Oral Profeciency Test 5%

May vary by instructor each semester.

 

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