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Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

William R Nethercut

Professor Ph.D., Columbia University

William R Nethercut

Contact

Biography

FieldsGreek and Roman Literature, Egyptology

 

 

 


Interests

Greek and Roman Literature, Egyptology

MEL 321 • Daily Life In Ancient Egypt

42269 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WAG 101
(also listed as C C 348, MES 342 )
show description

This new course on Ancient Egypt will study the lives and experiences of specializing professionals  (Scribes, Soldiers, Priests, Craftsmen, Bureaucrats, Judges, Artists and Musicians, Doctors, Fan Bearers for the King ) and of the population at large (Slaves, Farm workers, Newcomers and Foreigners), at home as family, in the country, as travelers on the road. What was it like to be an Egyptian woman? We have the letters of young lovers, the magical spells used to control straying passion or to punish an enemy, the charms and amulets which protected a young mother during pregnancy and childbirth. Women wrote wills, appeared in court, and could initiate divorce.  Lineage passed along the maternal side of the family. What would it have been like to be Pharaoh for a day? Personal religion, Public Festivals, Hygiene and refuse control, Pets, Mummification and the provision of food, clothing, furniture and personal articles (like razors, mirrors or sewing needles) for the dead, even pornography and rituals to renew potency- all of these topics and many more find their place within our study.

Texts

Donald Ryan,  Ancient Egypt on 5 Deben a Day  (Thames & Hudson, London, 2010)

Pierre Montet,  Everyday Life in Egypt in the Days of Ramesses the Great (Pennsylvania Edition, 1981)

Sergio Donadoni,  The Egyptians  (University of Chicago Press, 1997)

Grading

Two Hour Exams (35 % each) and a Research Paper (30%)

 

 

MES 342 • Daily Life In Ancient Egypt

42512 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WAG 101
(also listed as C C 348, MEL 321 )
show description

This new course on Ancient Egypt will study the lives and experiences of specializing professionals  (Scribes, Soldiers, Priests, Craftsmen, Bureaucrats, Judges, Artists and Musicians, Doctors, Fan Bearers for the King ) and of the population at large (Slaves, Farm workers, Newcomers and Foreigners), at home as family, in the country, as travelers on the road. What was it like to be an Egyptian woman? We have the letters of young lovers, the magical spells used to control straying passion or to punish an enemy, the charms and amulets which protected a young mother during pregnancy and childbirth. Women wrote wills, appeared in court, and could initiate divorce.  Lineage passed along the maternal side of the family. What would it have been like to be Pharaoh for a day? Personal religion, Public Festivals, Hygiene and refuse control, Pets, Mummification and the provision of food, clothing, furniture and personal articles (like razors, mirrors or sewing needles) for the dead, even pornography and rituals to renew potency- all of these topics and many more find their place within our study.

Texts

Donald Ryan,  Ancient Egypt on 5 Deben a Day  (Thames & Hudson, London, 2010)

Pierre Montet,  Everyday Life in Egypt in the Days of Ramesses the Great (Pennsylvania Edition, 1981)

Sergio Donadoni,  The Egyptians  (University of Chicago Press, 1997)

Grading

Two Hour Exams (35 % each) and a Research Paper (30%)

 

 

MES 310 • Introduction To Ancient Egypt

41680 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm JES A121A
(also listed as C C 304C )
show description

This course is for the beginner. There are no pre-requisites other than a fascination for what has always seemed mysterious and powerful. We shall explore the most important chapters of Egypt's story, beginning with what is known of the pre-historical period from 13,000 B.C. down to the Neolithic and Pre-Dynastic era, 6,000 to 4,000 B.C. We shall then study the Old Kingdom, its first dynasties, monuments, personalities, culture, development of the hieroglyphic system, earliest mythological traditions (3100 to 2125 B.C.). The same inclusive review of language, culture, and history will be presented for the Middle Kingdom (2125 to 1550 B.C.) and New Kingdom (1550 to 1069 B.C.) In every instance we shall compare the Egyptian way of thinking with the cultural styles of the major Near Eastern civilizations. It will be particularly instructive to discover the ways in which Egyptian traditions were altered as we move down through the centuries. A startling example is the transformation of Set from a captain of Ra in the Old Kingdom who drove off the underworld Serpent to a base deceiver in the New Kingdom, or of Osiris, a disturbingly powerful force among the Dead in the Old Kingdom, into a more welcoming "St. Peter" in King Tut's funeral chamber (New Kingdom). Nubia (Sudan) and the influence of Nubia and Egypt in the early centuries CE is also covered, taking in the Coptic culture as a blend of Greek and Egyptian.

Texts: Manley, Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Egypt

Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt by Bill Manley ISBN 0 -500 - 05123 - 2

MES 310 • Introduction To Ancient Egypt

41531 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm JES A121A
(also listed as C C 304C )
show description

This course is for the beginner. There are no pre-requisites other than a fascination for what has always seemed mysterious and powerful. We shall explore the most important chapters of Egypt's story, beginning with what is known of the pre-historical period from 13,000 B.C. down to the Neolithic and Pre-Dynastic era, 6,000 to 4,000 B.C. We shall then study the Old Kingdom, its first dynasties, monuments, personalities, culture, development of the hieroglyphic system, earliest mythological traditions (3100 to 2125 B.C.). The same inclusive review of language, culture, and history will be presented for the Middle Kingdom (2125 to 1550 B.C.) and New Kingdom (1550 to 1069 B.C.) In every instance we shall compare the Egyptian way of thinking with the cultural styles of the major Near Eastern civilizations. It will be particularly instructive to discover the ways in which Egyptian traditions were altered as we move down through the centuries. A startling example is the transformation of Set from a captain of Ra in the Old Kingdom who drove off the underworld Serpent to a base deceiver in the New Kingdom, or of Osiris, a disturbingly powerful force among the Dead in the Old Kingdom, into a more welcoming "St. Peter" in King Tut's funeral chamber (New Kingdom). Grading: Three Examinations, each counting 33 13% of total grade   Texts: Manley, Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Egypt Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt by Bill Manley ISBN 0 -500 - 05123 – 2

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