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Kamran Scot Aghaie, Chair CAL 528 | 204 W 21st St F9400 | Austin, TX 78712-1029 • 512-471-3881

Drew Paul

Ph.D. in Arabic Studies, University of Texas at Austin

Ph.D. Candidate
Drew Paul

Contact

Interests

Arabic literature and language, Palestinian literature and film, Hebrew literature, Arabic pedagogy

MEL 321 • Crossing Boundaries

41569 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 3.116
(also listed as C L 323, MES 342 )
show description

What does it mean to cross a boundary? How do wars, conflicts, and social change create and tear down borders? In this course, we will attempt to answer these and other questions by examining the changing physical, cultural, and political boundaries that crisscross the Middle East. Beginning with historical and political contexts, we will explore how literature, film, and art cross, create, and redraw boundaries in works from Israel and Palestine, Lebanon, Egypt, Syria, and Iran. We will approach the boundary as not merely a dividing line but also as a dynamic space that people inhabit, transgress, and challenge. We will discuss the human effects of borders and border crossing by considering the impact of blockades and partitions on movement of migrants and refugees. Moving beyond physical borders, we will also examine the ways in which literature and cinema approach boundaries of language, gender, and sexuality. Finally, we will consider the ways in which the notion of "crossing boundaries" informs our understanding of the Arab Spring and other current events in the Middle East.

Texts/Readings

Suad Amiry, Nothing to Lose But Your Life

Huda Barakat, Tiller of Waters

Simone Bitton, Mur (Wall)

Kambuzia Partovi, Border Cafe

Course Packet

Other texts TBA by the instructor

 

MES 342 • Crossing Boundaries

41699 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 3.116
(also listed as C L 323, MEL 321 )
show description

What does it mean to cross a boundary? How do wars, conflicts, and social change create and tear down borders? In this course, we will attempt to answer these and other questions by examining the changing physical, cultural, and political boundaries that crisscross the Middle East. Beginning with historical and political contexts, we will explore how literature, film, and art cross, create, and redraw boundaries in works from Israel and Palestine, Lebanon, Egypt, Syria, and Iran. We will approach the boundary as not merely a dividing line but also as a dynamic space that people inhabit, transgress, and challenge. We will discuss the human effects of borders and border crossing by considering the impact of blockades and partitions on movement of migrants and refugees. Moving beyond physical borders, we will also examine the ways in which literature and cinema approach boundaries of language, gender, and sexuality. Finally, we will consider the ways in which the notion of "crossing boundaries" informs our understanding of the Arab Spring and other current events in the Middle East.

Texts/Readings

Suad Amiry, Nothing to Lose But Your Life

Huda Barakat, Tiller of Waters

Simone Bitton, Mur (Wall)

Kambuzia Partovi, Border Cafe

Course Packet

Other texts TBA by the instructor

 

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