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David Sosa, Chair 2210 Speedway, WAG 316, Stop C3500, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4857

Al P. Martinich

Professor PhD, University of California at San Diego

Roy Allison Vaughan Centennial Professor in Philosophy
Al P. Martinich

Contact

Biography

A specialist in the history of modern philosophy and the philosophy of language, his books include Communication and Reference (1984), The Two Gods of Leviathan (Cambridge, 1992), A Hobbes Dictionary (Blackwell, 1995), and Thomas Hobbes (St. Martin's, 1997). His book, Hobbes: A Biography (Cambridge, 1999) won the Robert W. Hamilton Faculty Book Award for 2000. He has also translated Hobbes' Computatio sive logica: Part One of De Corpore (1981), is co-editor with David Sosa of the leading anthology on The Philosophy of Language (sixth edition, Oxford, 2013), and also co-editor with David Sosa of Analytic Philosophy: An Anthology (second edition, Wiley, 2012) and A Companion to Analytic Philosophy (Blackwell, 2001). He is Vice-President of the Board of Directors of The Journal of the History of Philosophy, and has twice held NEH Fellowships. He has lectuerd extensively in Chine and has published articles in which he applies analytic philosophy to Chinese philosophy.

Interests

History of political philosophy, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, philosophy of language

PHL 354 • Origins Of Liberalism

43100 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 308
(also listed as CTI 335 )
show description

Description (one to three paragraph description of course content):

Liberal democracy is the theory that individual persons have certain rights that must be respected by governments and cannot be violated merely to improve the condition of the state. Key concepts to be discussed include liberty, democracy, the social contract, and the nature of authority and obligation.

The theory behind liberalism developed from or competed with several traditions such as democracy, republicanism and absolute sovereignty, which were influenced by various religious, economic and political beliefs over a long period of time. Perhaps the most crucial period in this development was seventeenth-century England.

This course is interdisciplinary. It will cover such political and religious events as The Gunpowder Plot, Charles I’s Personal Rule, the Long Parliament, the English Civil War and the execution of King Charles I, the Commonwealth, the Restoration of the Monarchy, the Exclusion Crisis, and the Glorious Revolution. Some crucial works in political philosophy by some great political philosophers, such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke will be discussed along with lesser but still significant theorists such as John Milton. The political relevance of some literary works, such as John Dryden’s Absalom and Achitophel will also be discussed.

A large part of this course will consist of working on a research paper, either alone or in partnership with one or two other students, as dictated by the topic and student interest.

 

List of Proposed Texts /Readings:

Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan revised edition (edited by Martinich and Battiste) (Broadview)

John Locke, Two Treatises of Government

Robert Buchholz and Newton Key, Early Modern England, 1485-1714

A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing 3rd ed. (Wiley-Blackwell)

 

Proposed Grading Policy:

Class Participation and Assignments: 20%

In term tests: 30%

First Essay: 1,000-2,500 words: 10%

Research Essay: 4,000-7,000 words: 40%

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

43150-43170 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 100pm-200pm ART 1.102
(also listed as CTI 310, R S 305 )
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about
the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's
existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will.
Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various
attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according
to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a
contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked
whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the
course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or
not rational about the views expressed in each.
Note: This is not a course in world religions.

PHL 381 • Hobbes And Locke

43500 • Spring 2014
Meets TH 1230pm-330pm WAG 312
show description

Graduate standing and consent of graduate advisor or instructor required.

Course Description

 Thomas Hobbes and John Locke are two of the greatest political philosophers of all time. This seminar will focus on their political philosophies, which include discussions of the original condition of human beings (the state of nature), the origin of government, the scope and limits of sovereignty (government), the justification of revolution, and the nature and place of religion within a society.

The first class meeting will provide the context of seventeenth century philosophy as a preparation for a close reading of Hobbes and Locke. We will also discuss Introduction” of Leviathan, “Preface” of Two Treatises of Government, and chapter 1 of Book I of On the Social Contract during the first class.

Grading

Class participation: 30%

Final Essay: 70% (10-15 pages; 2500-4000 words; due on the last class day.)

Texts

Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, (edited by either Edwin Curley, J. C. A. Gaskin, C. B. Macpherson, A. P. Martinich, or Richard Tuck).

John Locke, Two Treatises of Government (edited either by Ian Shapiro (Yale UP or by

Peter Laslett, Cambridge UP).

A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing 3rd ed. (Blackwell).

Recommended: A. P. Martinich, Hobbes (Routledge)

 

This course satisfies the History requirement

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

42875-42885 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-130pm WAG 420
(also listed as CTI 310, R S 305 )
show description

This course investigates four attitudes of beliefs that have been held about the relations of humans to God. The first is an ancient view, according to which God's existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will. Second is a medieval view, according to which the existence of God and his various attributes are suitable subjects for proof and arguments. Third is a modern view that God exists but that little is known about Him and that, in any case, humans must attend to their own affairs. Fourth is a contemporary view that God is assumed not to exist, and it is questioned whether any events have any value at all and whether human life has meaning.

 

Grading:

1st test: 20%2nd test 30%Final examination: 40%Class participation: 10%

 

Texts:

The Bible (preferred: Harper Collins Study Bible, Student Edition. Also acceptable: The Access Bible; Oxford Study Bible; Catholic Study Bible; New English Bible (Study Edition), or New American Bible) (The NIV translation is fine; but some commentaries are misleading for the purposes of this course.)The Major Works, Anselm of Canterbury (Oxford UP)Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes (edited by either Curley, Gaskin, Martinich, or Tuck)Twilight of the Idols and The Anti-Christ, Friedrich Nietzsche (ed. Tanner)Philosophical Writing 3rd ed., A. P. Martinich

PHL 354 • Origins Of Liberalism

43150 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WAG 208
(also listed as CTI 335, EUS 346 )
show description

Liberal democracy is roughly the theory that individual persons are free and equal and must be respected by governments. Freedom and equality are typically connected with the rights of individuals. Key concepts to be discussed include liberty, democracy, the social contract, and the nature of authority and obligation.

The theory behind liberalism developed from or competed with several traditions such as democracy, republicanism and absolute sovereignty. These traditions were influenced by various religious, economic and political beliefs over a long period of time. Perhaps the most crucial period in this development was seventeenth-century (Stuart) England.

This course is interdisciplinary. It will cover such political and religious events as the Gunpowder Plot, Charles I’s Personal Rule, the Long Parliament, the English Civil War and the execution of King Charles I, the Commonwealth, the Restoration of the Monarchy, the Exclusion Crisis, and the Glorious Revolution. Some classic works in political philosophy such as Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan and John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government will be discussed, along with those by lesser but still significant theorists such as John Milton. The political relevance of some literary works, such as Milton’s, “On the New Forcers of Conscience under the Long Parliament,” and John Dryden’s Absalom and Achitophel may also be discussed.

A large part of this course will consist of working on a research paper, either alone or in partnership with one or two other students, as dictated by the topic and student interest.

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

42550-42555 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm WAG 101
(also listed as CTI 310, R S 305 )
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about
the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's
existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will.
Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various
attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according
to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a
contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked
whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the
course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or
not rational about the views expressed in each.
Note: This is not a course in world religions.

PHL 327 • Interpretation And Meaning

42720 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm WAG 302
show description

We will examine recent work in philosophy that is written from a Christian point of view or that examines philosophical questions that arise within the framework of the Christian faith. The issues to be covered include the relationship between faith and reason, the possibility of demonstrating the existence of God, the problem of evil, the problem of reconciling divine foreknowledge and sovereignty with human responsibility, and the relation of God to time.  Special emphasis will be placed on the relevance of Christian philosophy to foundational questions concerning reality, knowledge and ethics. 

Prerequisites: no prior work in philosophy is expected.  Non-majors are encouraged.

Texts:

G. K. Chesterton, St. Thomas Aquinas

C. S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man

Josef Pieper, Leisure: The Basis of Culture

Francis A. Schaeffer, He is There and He is not Silent

Kelly J. Clark, Return to Reason

Phl 327 Supplemental Readings, available at UT Library electronic reserves. 

Evaluation:

• Three in-class exams (combination of essay and multiple choice): 25% each (including an in-class test on Dec. 7).  There will be an optional, comprehensive final that can be counted for 25% of the course grade, permitting a student to drop the lowest in-class test grade.

• Short papers (eight 2-page responses to the readings): 10%. Short papers are to be turned in at the beginning of class on Monday, responding to the coming week's reading.

• Class and section participation: 15%

• Optional term paper: due the last day of class.  2500-3000 words on a topic pre-approved by the instructor.  The term paper may be used to drop a low midterm grade, or in place of the third in-class exam, at the student's discretion.

 

Instructor: Prof. Rob Koons.  Phone: 471-5530.  koons@mail.utexas.edu

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

42420-42430 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as CTI 310, R S 305 )
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about
the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's
existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will.
Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various
attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according
to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a
contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked
whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the
course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or
not rational about the views expressed in each.
Note: This is not a course in world religions.

PHL 354 • Origins Of Liberalism

42650 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 900am-1030am CBA 4.324
(also listed as CTI 335 )
show description

While North Americans and Europeans believe that liberal democracy is the best form of government, this was not always true. (Many people throughout the world today do not think it is true.) Liberal democracy is the theory that the individual person has certain rights, not dependent on the existence of government. Key concepts of liberalism include liberty, democracy, contract, and obligation.

The theory behind liberalism developed from several traditions (republicanism, democracy, and limited sovereignty) influenced by various religious, economic and political beliefs and values, over a long period of time. Perhaps the most crucial period in this development was seventeenth-century England.

This course is interdisciplinary. It begins with the religious and political history of the seventeenth century (which includes the Gunpowder Plot, the Long Parliament, the English Civil War, the Rump Parliament, the execution of King Charles I, the establishment of the Commonwealth, the restoration of the Monarchy, the Exclusion Crisis, and the Glorious Revolution.) Then some crucial works in political philosophy by some of the greatest political philosophers in history, such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke will be discussed. Parts of two books written by John Milton, no political slouch, will be read, one in defense of the beheading of the king. The political relevance of some literary works will also be discussed.

A large part of this course will consist of working on a research paper, either alone or in partnership with one or two other students, as the topic and student interest dictates.

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

42280 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 200pm-300pm CPE 2.212
(also listed as CTI 310, R S 305 )
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will. Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or not rational about the views expressed in each.

Note: This is not a course in world religions.

Books:

The Bible (preferred: New Oxford Annotated Bible, with Apocrypha, Student Edition or Harper Collins Study Bible. Also acceptable: The Access Bible, Catholic Study Bible; New English Bible (Study Edition), or New American Bible) (The NIV translation is fine; but most accompanying commentaries are misleading for the purposes of this course.)

The Major Works, Anselm of Canterbury (Oxford UP)

Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes (edited by either Curley, Gaskin, Martinich, or Tuck)

Twilight of the Idols and the Anti-Christ by Friedrich. Nietzsche (ed. Tanner)

Philosophical Writing 3rd ed., A. P. Martinich

 

Requirements and Grading:

1st test:                                    20%

2nd test                                    35%

3rd test:                                    40%

Class participation:            10% (+ 2)

PHL 381 • Descartes, Locke, And Hobbes

42595 • Fall 2011
Meets W 600pm-900pm WAG 312
show description

Foundations of Early Modern Philosophy

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

 Course Description

The metaphysical and epistemological views of Descartes, Hobbes, and Locke. Topics include the proper foundation for a philosophical system, the nature of knowledge, emotions, (free) will, personal identity (and religious toleration). 

Grading

Class participation: 20% (A class presentation will constitute part of this grade.)

Major Essay:  80% (3,500-6,000 words; due on the last day of lectures.)

Texts

Descartes’s Meditations on First Philosophy, with Objections and Replies,

Descartes, Principles of Philosophy, Part I

Locke, Essay Concerning Human Understanding (selections, mostly from Book II)

Locke, A Letter on Toleration

Hobbes, The Elements of Law Natural and Politic (selections from the part on natural philosophy and epistemology.

 

This seminar satisfies the History requirement

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

42885-42910 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-430pm WAG 101
(also listed as R S 305, R S 305 )
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about
the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's
existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will.
Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various
attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according
to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a
contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked
whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the
course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or
not rational about the views expressed in each.
Note: This is not a course in world religions.

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

42890 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-430pm WAG 101
(also listed as R S 305, R S 305 )
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about
the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's
existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will.
Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various
attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according
to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a
contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked
whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the
course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or
not rational about the views expressed in each.
Note: This is not a course in world religions.

PHL 354 • Origins Of Liberalism

43085 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 308
(also listed as CTI 335 )
show description

Description: While North Americans and Europeans believe that liberal democracy is the best form of government, this was not always true. (Many people throughout the world today do not think it is true.) Liberal democracy is the theory that the individual person has certain rights, not dependent on the existence of government. Key concepts of liberalism include liberty, democratic foundations, contractualism, and obligation.

The theory behind liberalism developed from several traditions (republicanism, democracy, and limited sovereignty) influenced by various religious, economic and political beliefs and values, over a long period of time. Perhaps the most crucial period in this development was seventeenth-century England.

This course is interdisciplinary. It begins with the religious and political history of the seventeenth century (which includes the Gunpowder Plot, the Long Parliament, the English Civil War, the Rump Parliament, the execution of King Charles I, the establishment of the Commonwealth, the restoration of the Monarchy, the Exclusion Crisis, the Rye House Plot, and the Glorious Revolution.) Then some crucial works in political philosophy by some of the greatest political philosophers in history, such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke will be discussed. John Milton was also no political slouch, and two of his books, one in defense of the beheading of the king, will be read. The political relevance of some literary works will also be discussed.

A large part of this course will consist of working on a research paper, either alone or in partnership with one or two other students, as the topic and student interest dictates.

 

Books:            Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan

            John Locke, Two Treatises of Government

John Locke, On Toleration

            John Milton, Philosophical Writings

David Wootton, ed., Divine Right and Democracy

            A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing

Other Materials: Handouts containing excerpts from John Dryden and Andrew Marvell, and others

 

Requirements:

Class Participation and Assignments: 15%

Midterm Exam: 15%

First Essay: 1,000-3,500 words: 10%

Research Essay: 4,000-7,000 words: 50%

Final Exam: 10%

PHL 381 • Hobbes And Locke

42560 • Fall 2010
Meets W 1230pm-330pm WAG 312
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

This course satisfies the History requirement.

Course Description:

Thomas Hobbes and John Locke are the two greatest English political philosophers and two of the greatest philosophers of any age. This seminar will focus on their political philosophies, which include discussions of the original condition of human beings (the state of nature), the origin and justification of government, the scope and limits of (government), the justification of revolution, and the nature and place of religion within a society.

The first class meeting will provide the context of seventeenth century philosophy as a preparation for a close reading of the texts. For that week we will discuss "Introduction" of Leviathan and “Preface” of Two Treatises of Government.

Grading Policy:

Class participation: 30%; Midterm Essay: 20% (3-5 pages; 500-1500 words); Final Essay: 50% (10-15 pages; 2500-4000 words) This essay may be a revision and expansion of the midterm essay.

Class Participation includes submitting five questions or comments (50-150 words each) on the readings

Texts:
Books: Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, (edited by either Edwin Curley, J. C. A. Gaskin, C. B. Macpherson, A. P. Martinich, or Richard Tuck).
John Locke, Two Treatises of Government (Cambridge UP)
A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing 3rd ed. (Blackwell)

 

PHL 305 • Intro Philos Of Religion-Hon

42965 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 100pm-200pm ETC 2.108
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about
the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's
existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will.
Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various
attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according
to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a
contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked
whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the
course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or
not rational about the views expressed in each.
Note: This is not a course in world religions.

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

42970-42990 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 100pm-200pm ETC 2.108
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about
the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's
existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will.
Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various
attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according
to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a
contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked
whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the
course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or
not rational about the views expressed in each.
Note: This is not a course in world religions.

PHL 387 • Law And Justice

43345 • Spring 2010
Meets M 600pm-900pm WAG 210
(also listed as GOV 384N, LAW 379M )
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

Course Description

The seminar will be a study in the history of modern philosophical treatments of emotions. The focus will be on how the study of emotions developed from a study within moral philosophy to a scientific study.

Grading

The course grade will be based on a seminar paper and participation in seminar discussion. The paper will be the chief factor in determining the grade.

Texts

Descartes: The Passions of the Soul

Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature, book II

William James, The Principles of Psychology, chapter 25

Paul Griffiths, What Emotions Really Are

Martha Nussbaum, Upheavals of Thought, chapter 1

 This course satisfies the Ethics requirement

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

43155-43180 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-300pm WAG 101
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about
the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's
existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will.
Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various
attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according
to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a
contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked
whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the
course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or
not rational about the views expressed in each.
Note: This is not a course in world religions.

PHL 375M • Hobbes, Locke, And Rousseau-W

43458 • Fall 2009
Meets W 300pm-600pm WAG 302
show description

The aim of the course is to attain a holistic grasp of Humeʼs philosophy. Philosophy courses are often divided by subject area (metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of mind, and so on). Hume wrote on all the main topics in philosophy, and our goal is not only to evaluate his individual contributions, but also to see how the views on various topics fit together. The class presupposes some knowledge of philosophy, but not of Humeʼs work. 

PHL 305 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

42150-42175 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 1200-100pm ETC 2.108
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about
the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's
existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will.
Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various
attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according
to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a
contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked
whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the
course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or
not rational about the views expressed in each.
Note: This is not a course in world religions.

PHL 305 • Intro Philos Of Religion-Hon

42165 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 1200-100pm ETC 2.108
show description

This course investigates four different attitudes that have been held about
the relation of humans to God. First is an ancient view according to which God's
existence is presupposed and all events are interpreted as expressions of God's will.
Second is a medieval view according to which the existence of God and his various
attributes are suitable subjects for proof and argument. Third is a modern view according
to which God exists but little is known about him through reasoning. Fourth is a
contemporary view according to which God is assumed not to exist, and it is asked
whether anything has any value and whether human life has a meaning. Although the
course is divided historically, our goal will be to identify what is true or false, rational or
not rational about the views expressed in each.
Note: This is not a course in world religions.

PHL 375M • Interpretation And Meaning-W

42512 • Spring 2009
Meets W 300pm-600pm PAR 210
show description

The aim of the course is to attain a holistic grasp of Humeʼs philosophy. Philosophy courses are often divided by subject area (metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of mind, and so on). Hume wrote on all the main topics in philosophy, and our goal is not only to evaluate his individual contributions, but also to see how the views on various topics fit together. The class presupposes some knowledge of philosophy, but not of Humeʼs work. 

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