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David Sosa, Chair 2210 Speedway, WAG 316, Stop C3500, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4857

Adam Pautz

Associate Professor PhD, New York University

Contact

Biography

Pautz is interested in consciousness, the philosophy of perception, the sensible qualities, and "the naturalization program". Please click on the link to his personal website for recent papers and projects.

Interests

Philosophy of Mind, Metaphysics and Epistemology

PHL 323K • Metaphysics

43005 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 0.120
show description

We will examine some main issues in metaphysics: personal identity, free will, God, and color.

PHL 323K • Metaphysics-Phl Majors

43320 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 208
show description

This course is an overview of some of the central topics in metaphysics.
Metaphysics, generally speaking, is the branch of philosophy concerned
with the nature of reality; metaphysicians seek an understanding of the
fundamental sorts of things that constitute the world, as well as of the
structure of the world itself.
We will begin by focusing on issues surrounding one particular sort of
thing: persons. In particular, we will be considering different views
regarding what it is to be a person and for a person to persist through
change. This will lead to more general discussions of the nature and
structure of time and the persistence of things through temporal change.
From there we’ll take up the issue of composition. In particular, we’ll be
concerned with the following question: Under what circumstances do
some things (parts) compose another thing (whole)? We’ll then turn to the
problems of universals and individuation – how do we account for (i)
similarities among distinct things and (ii) the distinctness of exactly
similar things? We’ll conclude the course with a discussion of possible
worlds.

PHL 375M • Perception

43465 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.118
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Description (one to three paragraph description of course content):

 

 

We will examine philosophical puzzles concerning perception. What determines the quality of experience? What is it to perceive a thing? How does perception provide knowledge of the external world? Are things really as they seem? We will look at the main traditional and contemporary philosophical answers to these problems: sense datum theory, inner state theory, intentional theory, and naïve realism. We will invoke empirical results in psychophysics and neuroscience in deciding between these alternatives, as well as traditional philosophical arguments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of Proposed Texts /Readings (N/A, TBD, and Course Packet are not acceptable responses):

 

 

 

Perception, a book MS by Pautz forthcoming with Routledge.

Selections from Vision and Mind, ed. Alva Noe, MIT Press.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed Grading Policy:

 

 

Student presentation: 10%

Final seminar essay: 90%

Class participation will be taken into account in borderline cases.

 

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind

43050 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WAG 308
show description

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 384F • First-Year Seminar

43210 • Fall 2013
Meets W 630pm-930pm WAG 312
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Prerequisites

This course is restricted to first year graduate students in philosophy.

No auditing will be allowed.

Course Description

In this course we’ll study articles and book chapters that are now widely agreed to have been among the 20th century’s “greatest hits”, focusing on philosophy of language and mind, metaphysics and epistemology. One main sequence of weekly topics will take us from Frege through Kripke, another sequence will concern perception and consciousness, and a third sequence will concern contemporary discussions of skepticism about knowledge.

Grading

Mid-semester paper 40%, 0.

Final paper 40%

Two Presentations, 10% each.

Class participation can shift a borderline grade (based on the participation’s quality, not quantity).

Texts

Naming and Necessity by Saul Kripke

All readings will be available electronically.

Unless labeled “optional”, all readings are required for everyone, including the presentation material.

 

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind

42585 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 308
show description

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 382 • Consciousness & Intentionality

42725 • Fall 2012
Meets T 630pm-930pm WAG 312
show description

PHL 382 • Recent Work on Consciousness and Intentionality

Pautz • Meets TH 6:30 – 9:30 PM in WAG 312

 

 

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

 

Course Description

The twin puzzles of consciousness and intentionality are among the main issues in the philosophy of mind. Many now think that the two issues are very related.

The purpose of this seminar is two-fold: to provide students with a basic background on these issues and their history, and also to look at some interesting new work on them.

Topics covered will include: first-order versus higher-order theories of consciousness, functionalist versus biological approaches to consciousness, intentionalism about consciousness, consciousness in non-visual modalities, tracking theories of intentionality, the "phenomenal intentionality program", cognitive phenomenology.

 

Grading

One term paper (16-20 pages) or two shorter papers (8-10 pages each), due at the end of the semester: 100% of grade. Requirement: in-class presentation.

 

Texts

Essays on other background material provided on blackboard. Selections from two recent books: *The Conscious Brain* (Prinz) and *The Sources of Intentionality* (Kriegel).

 

This course satisfies the M&E requirement

 

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind

42495 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 308
show description

Prerequisites:  6 semester hours of coursework in Philosophy.

This course examines the place of the mind in the physical world. Topics covered include the reduction of the mind to the brain, whether a machine could think, intentionality, consciousness, and personal identity.

Grading Policy Midterm: 40% Final Exam: 30% Final Paper: 30% Class participation will be rewarded

Texts:

Philosophy of Mind and Cognition, Jackson and Braddon-Mitchell

Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings, Chalmers (ed.)

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind-Phl Majors

42995 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WAG 308
show description

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 375M • Manifest Image And Sci Image

43169 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am RLM 5.118
show description

The aim of the course is to attain a holistic grasp of Humeʼs philosophy. Philosophy courses are often divided by subject area (metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of mind, and so on). Hume wrote on all the main topics in philosophy, and our goal is not only to evaluate his individual contributions, but also to see how the views on various topics fit together. The class presupposes some knowledge of philosophy, but not of Humeʼs work. 

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind

42455 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BEN 1.124
show description

Prerequisite
6 semester hours of coursework in Philosophy

Course Description
This course examines the place of the mind in the physical world. Topics covered include the reduction of the mind to the brain, whether a machine could think, intentionality, consciousness, and personal identity.

Grading Policy
Midterm: 40%
Final Exam: 30%
Final Paper: 30%

Class participation will be rewarded

Texts
● Philosophy of Mind and Cognition, Jackson and Braddon-Mitchell
● Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings, Chalmers (ed.)

PHL 382 • Contemp Issues In Metaphysics

42565 • Fall 2010
Meets M 600pm-900pm WAG 312
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

This course satisfies the M&E requirement.

Course Description:
This seminar is meant to be an introductory survey of some contemporary issues in metaphysics. Topics covered may include properties, laws of nature, 'extended consciousness' (Noe, Hurley, etc.), the metaphysics of belief (realism versus instrumentalism), personal identity, color, and error theories in ethics.

Grading Policy:
Grades will be determined on the basis of short papers or one longer paper due at the end of the semester. Students will be required to do a presentation on one of the readings (though I will not grade this).

Texts:
Papers provided on blackboard.

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind

43140 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BEN 1.126
show description

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 375M • Manifest Image And Sci Image-W

43300 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WAG 112
show description

The aim of the course is to attain a holistic grasp of Humeʼs philosophy. Philosophy courses are often divided by subject area (metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of mind, and so on). Hume wrote on all the main topics in philosophy, and our goal is not only to evaluate his individual contributions, but also to see how the views on various topics fit together. The class presupposes some knowledge of philosophy, but not of Humeʼs work. 

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind

43375 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm WEL 3.422
show description

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 323K • Metaphysics

42355 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm WAG 208
show description

This course is an overview of some of the central topics in metaphysics.
Metaphysics, generally speaking, is the branch of philosophy concerned
with the nature of reality; metaphysicians seek an understanding of the
fundamental sorts of things that constitute the world, as well as of the
structure of the world itself.
We will begin by focusing on issues surrounding one particular sort of
thing: persons. In particular, we will be considering different views
regarding what it is to be a person and for a person to persist through
change. This will lead to more general discussions of the nature and
structure of time and the persistence of things through temporal change.
From there we’ll take up the issue of composition. In particular, we’ll be
concerned with the following question: Under what circumstances do
some things (parts) compose another thing (whole)? We’ll then turn to the
problems of universals and individuation – how do we account for (i)
similarities among distinct things and (ii) the distinctness of exactly
similar things? We’ll conclude the course with a discussion of possible
worlds.

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind

42360 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 208
show description

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

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