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David Sosa, Chair 2210 Speedway, WAG 316, Stop C3500, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4857

Miriam Schoenfield

Assistant Professor PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Miriam Schoenfield

Contact

Biography

My primary research interests are in epistemology but I also have interests in ethics and normativity more broadly.

For more information, my CV and links to papers please visit www.miriamschoenfield.com

 

 

Interests

Epistemology, Ethics

PHL 313 • Introductory Symbolic Logic

42880-42890 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 302
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Introduction to symbolic logic (through first-order predicate logic); interpretations; formal proofs, consistency; some practical applications. Only one of the following may be counted: Computer Science 313H, 313K, Philosophy 313, 313K, 313Q.

 

List of Proposed Texts /Readings: TBD

 

Proposed Grading Policy:

Homework/Classwork/Quizes – 50%

Exams – 50%

PHL 327 • Philosophy Of Race And Gender

43040 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm RLM 5.114
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An exploration of leading theories in the philosophy of race and gender and their ethical and political implications.

 

List of Proposed Texts /Readings: TBD

 

Proposed Grading Policy:

Papers: 35%

Exams: 40%

Attendance, Participation and Short Assignments: 25%

PHL 304 • Contemporary Moral Problems

43035-43060 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.306
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An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of a number
of contemporary moral problems, including problems of abortion, sexual morality,
capital punishment, and pornography and hate speech.

PHL 313 • Introductory Symbolic Logic

42970-42980 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WAG 420
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This is a first course in deductive symbolic logic. We'll study formal languages for representing sentences
in logically precise ways, we'll study algorithms for evaluating arguments as logically valid or invalid, and
we'll get an introduction to some of the surprising discoveries logicians have made about what tasks no
algorithm can possibly do.

PHL 321K • Theory Of Knowledge

43025 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 208
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What do we know, what should we believe and why does it matter?  This course is an advanced introduction to epistemology.  It will be centered on the question of whether or not we know what we ordinarily take ourselves to know.  As if this weren’t exciting enough, we will also think about different theories of justification along the way and get into some contemporary debates about disagreement and Bayesian epistemology.  And we’ll talk about the cartoon.

 

Description

Systematic and detailed study of major issues in the theory of knowledge, such as the distinction between knowledge and belief, the criteria of knowledge, the justification of knowledge-claims, and perception. We’ll also talk about cartoons.

PHL 383 • Higher Order Evidence

42850 • Spring 2013
Meets M 1230pm-330pm WAG 312
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HIGHER ORDER EVIDENCE

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

Course Description

Higher order evidence concerns evidence of our own cognitive capabilities.  There has been a lot of recent literature on how to accommodate such evidence and how our higher order beliefs (about the rationality of our beliefs) should interact with the beliefs themselves. 

In the first part of the seminar we will think about how to accommodate higher order evidence generally, and then look into some more specific cases such as irrelevant influences on belief and evolutionary explanations for belief. 

In the second part of the seminar, we will read some papers about how theories of higher order evidence impact theories of rationality more generally.  We will spend some time discussing “bridge principles”: principles that say, roughly, that your credence in p should equal the expected rational credence in p.  We will then discuss connections between accommodating higher order evidence and views according to which what seems rational to the agent plays a large role in determine what is rational for that agent.

Grading

Grade based on term paper. Required: attendance and class presentation.

Texts

We’ll be reading papers by (in no particular order): Christensen, Weatherson, Kelly, Elga, Street, Aarnio, Horowitz and Sliwa, White, a couple things by yours truly (Schoenfield), and others.

PHL 313 • Introductory Symbolic Logic

42498 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WAG 420
show description

This is a first course in deductive symbolic logic. We'll study formal languages for representing sentences
in logically precise ways, we'll study algorithms for evaluating arguments as logically valid or invalid, and
we'll get an introduction to some of the surprising discoveries logicians have made about what tasks no
algorithm can possibly do.

PHL 321K • Theory Of Knowledge

42560 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 208
show description

What is knowledge? What are the principal types of knowledge, and what
does a person's knowing a claim or proposition p amount to? Philosophers
have commonly supposed that a person's having justification, or warrant, for
believing that p is a necessary condition of his/her knowing that p.
Accordingly, this course will be concerned with theories of justification as
well as of knowledge, along with the question of whether there can be
knowledge without what is called epistemic justification. Views in ancient,
early modern, and contemporary philosophy—also one Eastern view—will
be surveyed.

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