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David Sosa, Chair 2210 Speedway, WAG 316, Stop C3500, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4857

Michael Tye

Professor PhD, State University of New York at Buffalo

Contact

Biography

Professor Tye, one of the world's leading philosophers of mind, is the author of The Metaphysics of Mind (Cambridge, 1989), The Imagery Debate (MIT Press, 1991), Ten Problems of Consciousness: A Representational Theory of the Phenomenal Mind (MIT Press, 1995), Color, Consciousness, and Content (MIT Press, 2000), and Consciousness and Persons: Unity and Identity (Bradford, MIT, 2003), as well as dozens of articles in top philosophical journals. His recent papers include "Is Content-Externalism Compatible With Privileged Access?" (with Brian McLaughlin) (Philosophical Review, 1998), "Phenomenal Consciousness: The Explanatory Gap as a Cognitive Illusion" (Mind, 1999), "Vagueness and Reality" (Philosophical Topics, 2001), and "Of Colors, Kestrels, Caterpillars, and Leaves" (Journal of Philosophy, 2001, with Peter Bradley). Professor Tye has given talks at major symposia all over the world. In Spring 1997, he was invited to the University of Bielefeld in Germany for a week-long seminar on Ten Problems of Consciousness, which has also been the topic of a symposium in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research. Professor Tye has taught at Haverford College and Temple University, and is Visiting Professor of Philosophy at King's College, London.

Interests

Philosophy of mind, metaphysics, philosophy of language

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

41590-41610 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 101
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42640-42665 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.126
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

43210 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 100pm-400pm WAG 312
show description

Prerequisites

This course is restricted to graduate students in philosophy doctoral program.

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to

finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at

undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 40%

Teaching Observation Report 40%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

43005-43030 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 101
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 323M • Philosophy Of Mind-Phl Majors

42700 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 308
show description

What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to their body and the external
world? Could a robot or a computer be conscious? What is it to experience a pain? How does the mental fit
into the physical universe? Philosophical thinking about the mind has been focused on questions like these for
hundreds of years.
In this class we will consider some of the most important historical answers offered to the questions above as
well as the views of many contemporary philosophers of mind. Specifically, we'll look at theories like dualism,
the identity theory, functionalism, and others. The goal is for each student to be able to articulate the basic
issues examined, to describe several possible responses to those issues, and to evaluate those positions
critically. This course requires active participation, including reading assigned material before each class
meeting and participation in class discussions.
The objectives are:
(i) To raise the student's understanding of the complex nature and historical background of issues in
the philosophy of mind, and
(ii) To develop critical thinking and enable students to communicate in an intelligent manner on these
issues.

PHL 382 • Phl Of Mind: Color/Color Exper

42845 • Spring 2013
Meets T 330pm-630pm WAG 316
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate standing and consent of instructor required.

Course Description

In this seminar we will discuss and evaluate a range of theories of color and of color experience – eliminativist, reductivist, dispositionalist, physicalist, etc.

Grading

Three short essays

Texts

Texts will include Byrne and Hilbert Readings on Color Vol 1: The Philosophy of Color MIT Press 1997

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42270-42290 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm UTC 3.122
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body-Phl Majors

42295 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm UTC 3.122
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

42780 • Fall 2012
Meets T 1230pm-330pm WAG 312
show description

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

The grade will be based on the following items:

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 50%

A Statement of Teaching Philosophy 10%

Teaching Observation Reports (2) 20%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42245-42270 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm WAG 101
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42060-42080 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CAL 100
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.

We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots, Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different from ours, brains in vats.... We will consider whether these strange characters have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with mental lives.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body-Phl Majors

42085 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CAL 100
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

42670 • Fall 2011
Meets T 1230pm-330pm WAG 312
show description

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

The grade will be based on the following items:

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 50%

A Statement of Teaching Philosophy 10%

Teaching Observation Reports (2) 20%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42720-42760 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm GSB 2.124
show description

COURSE CONTENT

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.  We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots, Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different from ours, brains in vats.... We will consider whether these strange characters have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with mental lives.

 

Prerequisites: None

 

REQUIREMENTS

There are 2 closed book midterm tests and a closed book final exam.  All will be a combination of very short essay questions and questions of an analytical sort designed to test your understanding of the material covered. 

 

      Two midterm tests:  200

      One final exam:      100

                                       ---

                                      300

 

GRADING

A total of 300 points may be accrued through the whole course.  Attendance and class participation may contribute to raising the grades of students within a few points of the cutoff (but this is not guaranteed).  Individual letter grades per test or exam will NOT be recorded, only points earned are recorded.

 

ALL REQUIREMENTS MUST BE MET TO RECEIVE A FINAL GRADE.  This includes students taking the course on a pass/fail basis.

 

TEXTS

 There are three required texts:

     Paul Churchland, Matter and Consciousness

     David Papineau, Introducing Consciousness

     John Perry, A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality 

 

Some further readings are available on the web.

 

 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42100-42120 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CAL 100
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body-Phl Majors

42125 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CAL 100
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

42615 • Fall 2010
Meets T 1230pm-330pm WAG 312
show description

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

42800-42840 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1200 PAI 3.02
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

43000-43020 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1200 WAG 101
show description

 

303M: MIND AND BODY

 

 

 

Professor : Michael Tye

Webpage: https://webspace.utexas.edu/tyem/www/index.html

E-mail: mtye@mail.utexas.edu

Office: Waggener Hall 425

Office phone: 471-6789

Office hours:  12:30-2pm Thursday and by appointment

 

 

Prerequisites: None

 

 

REQUIREMENTS

 

There are 2 closed book midterm tests and a closed book final exam.  All will be a combination of very short essay questions and questions of an analytical sort designed to test your understanding of the material covered. 

 

     Two midterm tests: 200

      One final exam:    100

                                  ---

                                  300

 

No late exams will be administered without a documented reason (e.g., a doctor's note or a funeral slip).  Please contact Dr. Tye BEFORE the relevant test or exam to make alternative arrangements.

 

The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic

Accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

 

 

 

CLASS EXPECTATIONS

 

  1. Attendance is mandatory and will be taken sporadically in both lecture and discussion sections.  Missing 4 or 5 classes during the semester at which attendance is taken without a written excuse will result in a grade one level below that obtained on tests (e.g. a 'B' grade overall will be converted to a 'C').  Missing 6 or 7 classes will result in a grade two levels below that earned on tests.  Missing more than 7 classes will result in an automatic 'F' overall whatever grade is obtained on tests.  Those students taking the class on a pass/fail basis will receive an 'F' if they miss 6 or more classes.  Students who show a continued pattern of not showing up for discussion sections will receive an 'F' grade for the course.

 

  1. Students are expected to keep abreast of readings from all textbooks. In-class questions and class discussion are encouraged.

 

  1. Students MUST have an updated e-mail address in UTDirect and check e-mail at least every 2 days for class announcements. These announcements will also be made on the web at blackboard (go to courses.utexas.edu and follow the log-in instructions).  The instructor and the TA cannot be responsible for missed messages due to full mailboxes, etc.

 

4.   Prior to each class, the powerpoint slides for the upcoming class will be made available on the web at blackboard  with some key words missing (go to courses.utexas.edu, follow the log-in instructions, and then look under course documents for this class).  It is your responsibility to come to class with print-outs of these slides so that you can fill in the missing words during the class lectures.  The lecture pace will be too fast for you to write down the entire contents of the slides in the event that you do not bring copies of them with you.

 

5.  Experts advise that students spend 2-3 hours studying out-of-class, per hour in-class time, to earn a passing grade.  This means that students should spend an additional 5-7 hours studying philosophy of mind EACH week of class (not including the time spent in class).

 

 

GRADING:  A total of 300 points may be accrued through the whole course.  Attendance and class participation may contribute to raising the grades of students within a few points of the cutoff (but this is not guaranteed).  Individual letter grades per test or exam will NOT be recorded, only points earned are recorded.

 

ALL REQUIREMENTS MUST BE MET TO RECEIVE A FINAL GRADE.  This includes students taking the course on a pass/fail basis.

 

 

 

 

 

     Points needed for Final Grades

                      A 270-300 (A- 270-277.5)

                      B 240-269  (B+ 262.5-269; B 247.5-262; B- 240-247)

                      C 210-239   (C+ 232.5-239; C 217.5-232; C- 210-217)

                      D 175-209  (D+ 202.5-209; D 188-202; D- 175-187.5)

 

 

TEXTS

 There are three required texts:

     Paul Churchland, Matter and Consciousness

     David Papineau, Introducing Consciousness

     John Perry, A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality 

 

Some further readings are available on the web (as noted below).

 

 

COURSE CONTENT

 

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.

We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots, Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different from ours, brains in vats.... We will consider whether these strange characters have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with mental lives.

 

 

                                                 SCHEDULE OF TOPICS

 

August 27-September 8

 

1) Mind and Body: Introduction

 

2) Substance and Attribute Dualism

Churchland, Chapter 2, Section 1

Papineau, pp. 26-29, 54-58, 64-81.

 

 

 

September 10 - September 22

 

1) Idealism

Papineau, pp. 30-36.

 

2) Behaviorism

Churchland, Chapter 2, Section 2.

Papineau, pp. 37-42.

 

3) The Turing Test

Papineau, pp. 90-93.

Turing: Computing Machinery and Intelligence, http://cogprints.org/499/0/turing.html

 

 

September 24 - October 22

 

1) Mind-Brain Identity

Churchland, Chapter 2, Section 3.

Papineau, pp. 82-85.

 

 

         TEST 1: October 8

 

 

2) Functionalism

Churchland, Chapter 2, Section 4, pp. 36-38..

Papineau, pp. 42-55, 86-87.

 

3) Challenges to Functionalism

     The China Body Problem

     Searle's Chinese Room

     The Inverted Spectrum

Churchland, Chapter 2, Section 4, p. 38-42.

Papineau, 88-89, 91-95

Searle, Minds, Brains, and Programs,                                                                             http://www.bbsonline.org/documents/a/00/00/04/84/bbs00000484-00/bbs.searle2.html

 

October 27 - November 5

 

1) Consciousness and Change Blindness

O'Regan, Experience is not something we feel but something we do,

http://nivea.psycho.univ-paris5.fr/ASSChtml/Pacherie4.html

 

2) Mary's Room and Consciousness

 

Papineau, pp. 3-14, 59-61, 100-103, 106-108.

Churchland, pp. 33-34.

Tye: Qualia, http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/qualia

 

     

 

November 10 - December 3

 

1) Computationalism

Churchland, Chapter 6.

 

 

         TEST 2: November 12

 

  

2) Freewill

 

3) The Nature of Persons and Personal Identity

All three parts of the book by Perry

 

 

December 3

 

1)  Eliminative Materialism

Churchland, pp. 43-49.

 

 

 

 

FINAL EXAM: in the period December 9-15.

 

 

General Background Readings:

 

S. Guttenplan: A Companion to the Philosophy of Mind, Blackwell 1994

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: http://plato.stanford.edu, sections in encyclopedia on topics covered.

 

 

PHL 303M • Mind And Body-Phl Majors

43025 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1200 WAG 101
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

PHL 398T • Supv Teaching In Philosophy

43555 • Fall 2009
Meets F 1200-300pm WAG 307
show description

Restricted to Philosophy Graduate Students.

Prerequisites

Consent of Graduate Advisor required.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree

Course Description

This seminar, required for the PhD in philosophy, prepares students to teach and to finish the PhD with a teaching portfolio that includes syllabi for courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Grading

The grade will be based on the following items:

Course Syllabi (2 introductory, 2 upper-division, 1 graduate) 50%

A Statement of Teaching Philosophy 10%

Teaching Observation Reports (2) 20%

Participation 20%

Texts

Readings will be made available online.

PHL 303M • Mind And Body

41985-42025 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1200 PAI 3.02
show description

This course examines the relationship of the mind to the body. Topics covered
include whether a machine could think, the Turing Test for intelligence, the
reduction of the mind to the brain, whether consciousness can be captured
materialistically, and the nature of persons and personal identity.
We'll be thinking about immaterial spirits, futuristic computers and robots,
Martians who behave like us but who have an internal structure very different
from ours, brains in vats!. We will consider whether these strange characters
have thoughts and feelings. The point is not to consider bizarre cases just for the
sake of it, but to see what light we can shed on our own nature as beings with
mental lives.

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