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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Linking perceptual uncertainty and response variability in the visual cortex

Fri, August 2, 2013 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM • SEA 4.242 (small conference room)

The University of Texas at Austin

Center for Perceptual Systems 

Seminar Series 

"Linking perceptual uncertainty and response variability in the visual cortex"

 

Presented by

Gergo Orban, Ph.D.

University of Cambridge

8/2/2013

1:00  PM

SEA 4.242  (small conference room)

Bag Lunch Talk

 

Find information about current and upcoming talks at CPS on our website: 

 http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cps/events/calendar.php

 

Abstract:  Neural responses in the visual cortex are variable, and the magnitude and structure of this variability is systematically controlled by stimulus attributes. Current theories of cortical computation either ignore variability altogether, or only focus on unstructured Poisson-like aspects of spike count statistics. We present a theory that links variability of neural responses directly to a fundamental class of computations: probabilistic inference of environmental features based on noisy and ambiguous inputs. In the theory, neural activation patterns in primary visual cortex (V1) represent stochastic samples from the probability distribution arising from probabilistic inference, the posterior probability distribution. The proposed theory contains classical theories of V1 function as a special case: it suggests that trial-averaged mean responses are equivalent to averages over a set of samples. We show that such a sampling-based probabilistic representation predicts several previously unexplained key features of the variability and covariability of membrane potentials and spike counts in V1. These include the modulation of neural variability by the onset, contrast, and orientation of stimuli, non-classical receptive field modulation, as well as the close correspondence between evoked and spontaneous activities.

 


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