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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Rebecca Neal-Beevers

Research Scientist Ph.D., University of Miami

Rebecca Neal-Beevers

Contact

Biography

Dr. Neal-Beevers, pending funding, plans to accept a graduate student for Fall 2015.

Rebecca Neal received her Ph.D. in Child Clinical and Applied Developmental Psychology from the University of Miami in 2002. She completed her clinical internship in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University. Rebecca stayed on at Brown after internship to complete a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at the Brown University Center for the Study of Children at Risk (CSCR). She joined the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin in January 2005, and became an Assistant Professor in January 2009.

Rebecca's research interests fall into two related domains. Her primary area of interest involves the identification of early markers of developmental delay in at-risk populations. Recent work in this area focuses on understanding the contribution of early social-communicative (e.g., visual joint attention) and regulatory processes (e.g., infant cry) to developmental outcome (e.g., cognitive and language outcome). Rebecca maintains a second line of research in childhood autism. Recent efforts in this area used indices of physiological regulation (e.g., vagal tone) to understand social and communication deficits in children with autism and other pervasive developmental disorders. Other recent autism projects include an examination of emotion recognition abilities in high-functioning children with autism. Rebecca has received grant support from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. She has also received grant support from the National Institute of Drug Abuse.

When not at work, Rebecca and her husband, Chris, spend most of their time toting their 5-year-old son, Graham, and 2 year-old daughter, Julia, to various parks, Biscuit Brothers concerts, and birthday parties in and around Austin.

Selected Publications (See lab site for complete list of publications)

Neal, A.R., Lester, B.M., LaGasse, Linda L., & the Maternal Lifestyles Study, NICHD, Neonatal Research Network (under review). Testing the Biosocial Model of Infant Cry: 1-month cry predicts 36-month outcome in the Maternal Lifestyles Study.

Neal, A.R., Mundy, P.C., Claussen, A., Malik, S., Scott, K., & Acra, F. (under review). The relations between infant joint attention skill and cognitive and language outcome in at-risk children.

Neal, A.R. (2008) Autism. In D. Blanchfield (Ed.), The encyclopedia of life course and human development. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Publications.

Vaughan Van Hecke, A., Mundy, P., Acra, C.F., Block, J., Delgado, C., Venezia, M., Meyer, J., Neal, A.R., and Pomares, Y. (2007). Infant joint attention, temperament, and social competence in preschool children. Child Development.

Nathani, S., Oller, D.K., & Neal, A.R. (2007). On the robustness of vocal development: an examination of infants with moderate hearing impairment and additional risk factors.

LaGasse, L.L., Neal, A.R., & Lester, B.M. (2005). Assessment of Infant Cry: Acoustic Cry Analysis and Parental Perception. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 11, 83-93.

Morales, M., Mundy, P., Crowson, M., Neal, A.R., & Delgado, C. (2005). Individual Differences in Infant Attention Skills, Joint Attention and Emotion Regulation Behavior. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 29¸ 259-263.

Neal, A.R. Lester, B.M., Sheinkopf, S.J., LaGasse, L.L., Bauer, C.R., Shankaran, S., Bada, H.S., Poole, K., & Smeriglio, V. (2005, April). Infant cry as a marker of physiological and behavioral regulation in the Maternal Lifestyles Study (MLS). In A.R. Neal (Chair), Infant cry as a marker of regulatory development. Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Atlanta, GA.

Mundy, P.M. & Neal, A.R. (2001). Neural plasticity, joint attention, and autistic developmental pathology. International Review of Research in Mental Retardation, 23, 139-167.

Oller, D.K., Eilers, R.E., Neal, A.R., & Cobo-Lewis, A.B. (1998). Late onset canonical babbling: A possible early marker of abnormal development. American Journal on Mental Retardation , 103, 249-263.

Interests

Social and communication development in infants and young children, and early identification of developmental delay in at-risk populations; autism

PSY F339 • Behavior Problems Of Children

87575 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am NOA 1.102
show description

This course will cover the epidemiology, diagnosis, etiology, associated features, and treatment 

of psychological and developmental disorders in childhood and adolescence.  Relevant theories, 

research, and developmental considerations will also be reviewed.  This course will cover 

material related to infant mental health, disruptive behavior disorders, internalizing disorders, 

and developmental disorders.  Classes will be structured to include both lecture and class 

discussion.  Students are encouraged to bring questions and discussion points to class in order to 

promote in class discussion.  Final course grades are based on: (1) the best three scores of the four exams (three 

during the semester and the optional cumulative final exam; 100 points each), (2) one response 

papers (4-5 pages; 100 points), and (3) any extra credit points earned during the semester.  

PSY 339 • Behavior Problems Of Children

43170 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am NOA 1.124
show description

This course will cover the epidemiology, diagnosis, etiology, associated features, and treatment of psychological and developmental disorders in childhood and adolescence. Relevant theories, research, and developmental considerations will also be reviewed. This course will cover material related to infant mental health, disruptive behavior disorders, internalizing disorders, and developmental disorders. Classes will be structured to include both lecture and class discussion. Students are encouraged to bring questions and discussion points to class in order to promote in class discussion.

PSY F339 • Behavior Problems Of Children

87610 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am SEA 2.108
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will cover the epidemiology, diagnosis, etiology, associated features, and treatment

of psychological and developmental disorders in childhood and adolescence. Relevant theories,

research, and developmental considerations will also be reviewed. This course will cover

material related to infant mental health, disruptive behavior disorders, internalizing disorders,

and developmental disorders. Classes will be structured to include both lecture and class

discussion. Students are encouraged to bring questions and discussion points to class in order to

promote in class discussion.

PSY 389K • Theory & Tech Of Assessment I

43905 • Spring 2011
Meets M 100pm-400pm SEA 5.106
show description

Introduction to intelligence and personality testing procedures, test interpretation, and ethical issues pertaining to clinical interviewing and testing. Includes instruction and feedback on clinical report writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor received prior to registering.

PSY 339 • Behavior Problems Of Children

43135 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.126
show description

Prerequisites
Upper division standing required. PSY 301 and PSY 418 or an equivalent with a grade of at least C.


Course Description
This course will cover the epidemiology, diagnosis, etiology, associated features, and treatment of psychological and developmental disorders in childhood and adolescence. Relevant theories, research, and developmental considerations will also be reviewed.
This course will cover material related to infant mental health, disruptive behavior disorders, internalizing disorders, and developmental disorders. Classes will be structured to include both lecture and class discussion. Students are encouraged to bring questions and discussion points to class in order to promote in class discussion.

Grading Policy
Course Assignments & Grades:

Course grades are based on: the best three of four exams (three during the semester and an optional cumulative final exam), two brief response papers and any extra credit points earned during the semester.

Exams:

There will be three midterm exams and one cumulative final exam on the dates specified in the syllabus. Exams will include material presented in the assigned reading, class lectures, and any supplemental materials covered in class. Exams will consist of multiple choice, matching, true/false and short answer items.
Response Papers: Students are required to submit two 2-4 page response papers during the semester. These response papers should be related to readings assigned throughout the semester.

Texts
Textbook (required): E.J. Mash & D.A Wolfe, Abnormal Child Psychology, Fourth Edition (2007). [Please note that this textbook should be available in both used and new condition.  As well, the publisher - Cengage Learning) - provides options for renting this textbook or purchasing e-chapters at a reduced rate through their website.]

PSY 339 • Behavior Problems Of Children

87115 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am NOA 1.126
show description

Prerequisites
Upper division standing required. PSY 301 and PSY 418 or an equivalent with a grade of at least C.


Course Description
This course will cover the epidemiology, diagnosis, etiology, associated features, and treatment of psychological and developmental disorders in childhood and adolescence. Relevant theories, research, and developmental considerations will also be reviewed.
This course will cover material related to infant mental health, disruptive behavior disorders, internalizing disorders, and developmental disorders. Classes will be structured to include both lecture and class discussion. Students are encouraged to bring questions and discussion points to class in order to promote in class discussion.

Grading Policy
Course Assignments & Grades:

Course grades are based on: the best three of four exams (three during the semester and an optional cumulative final exam), two brief response papers and any extra credit points earned during the semester.

Exams:

There will be three midterm exams and one cumulative final exam on the dates specified in the syllabus. Exams will include material presented in the assigned reading, class lectures, and any supplemental materials covered in class. Exams will consist of multiple choice, matching, true/false and short answer items.
Response Papers: Students are required to submit two 2-4 page response papers during the semester. These response papers should be related to readings assigned throughout the semester.

Texts
Textbook (required): E.J. Mash & D.A Wolfe, Abnormal Child Psychology, Fourth Edition (2007). [Please note that this textbook should be available in both used and new condition.  As well, the publisher - Cengage Learning) - provides options for renting this textbook or purchasing e-chapters at a reduced rate through their website.]

PSY 389K • Theory & Tech Of Assessment I

44065 • Spring 2010
Meets M 100pm-400pm SEA 3.250
show description

Introduction to intelligence and personality testing procedures, test interpretation, and ethical issues pertaining to clinical interviewing and testing. Includes instruction and feedback on clinical report writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor received prior to registering.

PSY 339 • Behavior Problems Of Children

44099 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.126
show description

BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

PSY339 (Unique # 44099)

Fall 2009

 

Course Time: TTh 2:00-3:30pm                                    Course Location: NOA 1.126

 

Instructor:  Rebecca Neal, Ph.D.                                    TA: Valerie Van Horn Kerne, MA

Office/Phone:  SEA 3.216/ 475-8491                        SEA 2.122           

Email: neal@psy.utexas.edu                                                vanhornkerne@mail.utexas.edu

Office hours: T 3:30-4:30, Th 1:00-2:00pm                        Th 3:30-5:30pm, by appointment

           

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will cover the epidemiology, diagnosis, etiology, associated features, and treatment of psychological and developmental disorders in childhood and adolescence.  Relevant theories, research, and developmental considerations will also be reviewed.  This course will cover material related to infant mental health, disruptive behavior disorders, internalizing disorders, and developmental disorders.  Classes will be structured to include both lecture and class discussion.  Students are encouraged to bring questions and discussion points to class in order to promote in class discussion.

 

REQUIRED READING

 Textbook

E.J. Mash & D.A Wolfe (2010). Abnormal child psychology (4rd ed.).  Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.). (2001). Washington,

DC: American Psychological Association.

 

Articles

I. Nature, Nurture & Psychopathology

Margolin, G. & Gordis, Elana B. (2004).  Children’s exposure to violence in the family and

Community.  Current Directions in Psychological Science, 13, 152-155.

Belsky, J., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2007).   For better and for

worse: Differential susceptibility to environmental influences.  Current Directions in Psychological Science, 16, 300-304.

Pettit, G. (2004).  Violent children in developmental perspective: Risk and protective factors and

the mechanisms through which they (may) operate.  Current Directions in Psychological Science, 13, 194-197.

 

II. Infant Mental Health

Hunter, A. & Hemmeter, M.L. (2009).  The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for

Early Learning:  Addressing challenging behaviors in infants and toddlers.  Zero to Three, 29, 5-12.

Tarullo, A.R., Obradovic, J. & Gunnar, M.R. (2009).  Self-control and the developing brain. 

Zero to Three, 29, 31-37.

Papousek, M. (2009).  Solving Sleep Behavior Disorders in Infants and Toddlers. Zero to Three,

29, 38-43.

Parlakian, R. & Lerner, C. (2009).  Facing the challenge: What mothers have to say about their

young children’s difficult behaviors.  Zero to Three, 29, 60-61.

 

III. Autism

Muratori, F. (2008).  Early indicators of autism spectrum disorders.  Zero to Three, 28, 18-24.

Schreibman, L. (2008).  Treatment controversies in autism.  Zero to Three, 28, 38-45.

Additional Readings for Response Papers (AR):

Group 1:

 Clayton, V. (2006, April 4).  When babies see shrinks. MSNBC.com.

Steinhauer, J. (2005, May 22).  Only 4-Years Old and Expelled: Maybe Preschool is the

Problem.  The New York Times.

 

Group 2:

Wermund, B. (2009, August 12). Autism activists question H1N1 vaccine. The Daily Texan, 1-2.

Aleccia, J. (2008, August 22).  Vaccine-wary parents spark public health worry. More opt out for

fear of reactions, but do they endanger everyone else?  MSNBC.com.

 

Group 3:

 Zernicke, K. & Peterson, M. (2001, August 19).  School’s Backing of Behavior Drugs Comes

Under Fire. The New York Times.

Stolberg, S. (2002, November 17).  Preschool Meds.  The New York Times Magazine.

Rothenberger, A. & Banachewski, T. (2007).  Informing the ADHD Debate.  Scientific American

Reports, Special Edition on Child Development.

 

Group 4:

 Mahler, J. (2004, November 21).  The Antidepressant Dilemma.  The New York Times.

 Alvarez, L., (2004, December 21).  Help Eludes Depressed Children in Britain.  The New York

Times.

 

COURSE MATERIALS

Course materials including the syllabus, assignment descriptions, and readings will be posted on the electronic Blackboard system at https://courses.utexas.edu/.  Students are responsible for checking these online resources and downloading course materials. 

 

ATTENDANCE & CLASS PARTICIPATION

Class attendance is not mandatory, but is strongly recommended.  Exams will include material covered in class lectures that is not presented in the text.  Students are responsible for obtaining class notes from other students for missed lectures.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING

Guidelines for Exams: There will be three non-cumulative midterm exams and one (optional) cumulative final exam on the days specified in the syllabus.  Exams will include material presented in the assigned reading, class lectures, and any supplemental materials covered in class.  Exams will consist of multiple choice, matching, and true/false items.  Information regarding what material will be required for each exam will be posted on Blackboard approximately one week prior to each scheduled exam. 

 

For all exams, students are expected to arrive at the beginning of the class period; anyone arriving after any student has completed the exam and left the classroom will not be allowed to take the exam.  Exam grades will be posted online using the E-Gradebook system.  Exams will not be returned to students, but students will have the option of reviewing their exams with Ms. Kerne during her regular office hours.  The exam review period begins on the day that the exam grades are posted online and lasts for two weeks.  Students will not be permitted to review their exam after the review period has ended.  If a student believes an item was scored incorrectly, they may submit a written appeal to Dr. Neal.  The appeal should contain the student’s name, the item in question, and why they feel their response deserves additional credit. 

 

Dr. Neal will reply to each appeal by email/in writing.  All appeals must be received by Dr. Neal prior to the end of the review period for that exam.

 

Students are expected to take the exams on the days specified in the syllabus.  There will be no early or make-up midterm exams under any circumstances.  Students who miss one of the first three exams for any reason will be allowed to take the final exam to replace the missed one.  Students who miss more than one of the midterm exams for any reason will be allowed to take the final exam to replace one missed exam and will receive a zero for each additional missed exam.  For the final exam, makeup exams will only be allowed in the case of extreme medical or psychiatric circumstances.  In such instances, (1) the student must notify the instructor by phone or email that they are unable to take the final exam before the exam is scheduled to begin and  (2) the student must provide written documentation by a physician or clinician explicitly stating that the student was physically or emotionally unable to take the exam must be provided.  This documentation must be provided within 72 hours after the scheduled final exam date.  At the instructor’s discretion, a student missing the final exam (under the conditions stated above) may either be given a makeup exam or given an “incomplete” and allowed to take the final with a subsequent class, at which time the student will be assigned a grade.

 

Writing assignments:  During this course, you will be required to write two brief response papers.   For each paper you will be asked to respond to an issue raised in the popular media and use an empirical reference to support your position.  There will be four opportunities to submit the two assigned response papers.  Please note that students will be required to respond to either AR1 or AR2 AND either AR3 or AR4.  In other words, students are required to submit their first response paper for one of the two topics assigned before October 5th and to submit their second response paper for one of the two topics assigned after October 5th.  A description of these response paper assignments is posted on Blackboard.  These assignments should be completed using a standard word processing program; handwritten assignments will not be accepted.  Unless otherwise noted, page limits for the assignments reflect the following formatting guidelines: (1) lines should be double-spaced; (2) font should be no smaller than 11-point and no larger than 12-point; (3) acceptable fonts are limited to Courier, Arial, or Times New Roman; and (4) margins should set to be one inch at the top, bottom, left, and right side of the document.  The writing assignments are due by 2pm on the assignment due date.  The writing assignment may be submitted in class or to Dr. Neal’s mailbox (4th floor of the Seay Building). Writing assignments turned in after 2pm will be considered late.  Late submissions will be penalized 5 points per day until all points for that assignment have been depleted.  

 

Extra Credit: 

At different (unannounced) points during the semester, I will offer 1-2 extra credit points for responding correctly to in-class questions. 

 

Final grades: Final course grades are based on: (1) the best three scores of the four exams (three during the semester and the optional cumulative final exam; 100 points each), (2) two child observation paper (50 points each), and (3) any extra credit points earned during the semester    Under no circumstances will additional points be given (e.g., if you are just below a cut-off point) after the final distribution has been determined.

 

 

Final grade distribution: (out of a possible 400 points)

 

                                                A                        372 and above           

                                                A-                        360-371

                                                B+                        348-359

                                                B                        332-347           

                                                B-                        320-331

                                                C+                        308-319

C                        292-307

C-                        280-291

D+                        268-279

                                                D                        252-267

                                                D-                        240-251

F                        239 and below

 

Students who are satisfied with their grade based on the three midterm exams are not required to take the final exam.  Any student who chooses to may attempt to improve his or her grade by taking the final to replace their lowest midterm exam score.  Final grades will be calculated based on the best three of the possible (three midterm and final) exams. 

 

GENERAL POLICIES

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites: (a) PSY 301 with a C or better, (b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better, and (c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed).

 

Any time before taking the first exam you may drop the course with a Q grade. After that time you may drop with a Q only if your performance up to that time is C or better; otherwise you drop with a grade of F.

 

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

 

POLICY ON SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University.  Since dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. 

 

A particular area of concern in a class that requires a writing assignment is plagiarism.  A portion of one class session will be dedicated to reviewing information on plagiarism.  Additionally, students are responsible for reviewing http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.phpAssignments that include plagiarized material will receive a score of zero.  Additionally, acts of plagiarism will be reported directly to the Office of the Dean of Students according to disciplinary procedure (Option B, http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/downloads/discproc_academic.pdf).


COURSE SCHEDULE

Following is a list of the topics to be covered in each class. This is a tentative schedule, as some topics may take more time to review than others.  While topic dates may shift, assignment dates are fixed and will not change.

 

 

Date

Lecture Topics

Reading(s)*

 

8/27

Course Overview & Review of Assignments

 

9/1

Review of Plagiarism

Overview & History

Ch. 1

 

9/3

Developmental Psychopathology                          

Ch. 1, 2

 

9/8

Nature, Nurture & Psychopathology

Articles Group I

 

9/10

Assessment & Diagnosis

Ch. 4

 

9/15

Treatment

Ch. 4

 

9/17

*Exam 1

 

 

9/22

Infant Mental Health

*Response Paper 1 Due (AR 1)

Articles Group II

 

9/24

Mental Retardation

Ch. 9

 

9/29

Autism

Ch. 10,

Articles Group III

 

10/1

Autism

*Response Paper 2 Due (AR 2)

Ch. 10,

Articles Group III

 

10/6

Communication Disorders

Ch. 11

 

10/8

Learning Disorders

Ch. 11

 

10/13

ADHD

*Response Paper 3 Due (AR3)

Ch. 5

 

10/15

Case Studies & Review

 

 

10/20

*Exam 2

 

 

10/22

Conduct Disorders

Ch. 6

 

10/27

Conduct Disorders

Ch. 6

 

10/29

CDMRP Review (No class)

 

11/3

Anxiety Disorders: Phobias

Ch. 7

 

11/5

Anxiety Disorders: OCD & PTSD

Ch. 7

11/10

Mood Disorders: Depression

*Response Paper 4 Due (AR4)

Ch. 8

 

 

11/17

Mood Disorders: Bipolar Disorder

Anxiety Disorders: OCD

Ch. 8

 

11/19

Thought Disorders/Schizophrenia 

Ch. 10

 

11/24

Thought Disorders/Schizophrenia

Ch. 10

11/26

Thanksgiving Holiday (No Class)

 

 

12/1

Case Studies & Review

 

 

12/3

*Exam 3

 

 

12/12

7-10pm

*Cumulative Final Exam (Optional)

 

           

 

PSY 339 • Behavior Probs Of Children-W

44100 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 216
show description

Adjustment difficulties during childhood and adolescence; causation and treatment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 389K • Theory & Tech Of Assessment I

43315 • Spring 2009
Meets M 100pm-400pm SEA 3.250
show description

Clinical interviewing with adults and children; introduction to intelligence and personality testing procedures and test interpretation; and clinical report writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and approval of the committee on admission to clinical training.

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