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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

David M Buss

Professor Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

David M Buss

Contact

Biography

After completing his doctorate in 1981 at the University of California, Berkeley, David Buss spent four years as Assistant Professor at Harvard University. In 1985, he migrated to the University of Michigan, where he taught for 11 years before accepting his current position at the University of Texas in 1996. His primary interests include the evolutionary psychology of human mating strategies; conflict between the sexes; prestige, status, and social reputation; the emotion of jealousy; homicide; anti-homicide defenses; and stalking.

 

Selected Articles and Book Chapters

Interests

Evolutionary psychology, human mating strategies, conflict between the sexes, sexual victimization, prestige, status, and reputation, jealousy, stalking, and murder

PSY 334E • Evolutionary Psychology

44030 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.126
show description

Fundamentals of evolutionary psychology, including issues of natural and sexual selection, adaptation, and domain-specific psychological mechanisms. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 334E • Evolutionary Psychology

43740 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.126
show description

Fundamentals of evolutionary psychology, including issues of natural and sexual selection, adaptation, and domain-specific psychological mechanisms. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 334E • Evolutionary Psychology

43280 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.126
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Prerequisites

PREREQUISITE: FOR PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS, PSY 301 AND 418 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C IN EACH; FOR NONMAJORS, PSY 301 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C, AND 1 OF THE FOLLOWING WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.

Course Description

Fundamentals of evolutionary psychology, including the theories of natural and sexual selection. Contents cover problems of survival, long-term mating strategies, short-term sexual strategies, parenting, kinship, cooperative alliances, aggression and warfare, conflict between the sexes, and prestige, status, and social dominance.

Grading Policy

Grading will be based on 4 exams, worth 25% each. The exams will consist of 45 multiple choice questions worth 2 points each and 2 short answer questions worth 5 points each. Each exam will cover approximately one fourth of the material in the course. There is no final exam.

Texts

Buss, D.M. (2012). Evolutionary psychology: The new science of the mind, 4rd Edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Dawkins, R. (1989). The selfish gene. New York: Oxford.

PSY 334E • Evolutionary Psychology

43230 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.126
show description

This course will examine the mechanisms of the human mind through the lens of evolutionary psychology. We begin with a brief historical review of key theories in psychology and evolutionary biology. We then proceed to substantive topics, including problems of survival, short-term and long-term mating, sexuality, parenting, kinship, cooperation, aggression and warfare, conflict between the sexes, status, prestige, and dominance hierarchies. The course concludes by proposing a unified field that integrates the different branches of psychology.

PSY 334E • Evolutionary Psychology

43165 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.126
show description

This course will examine the mechanisms of the human mind through the lens of evolutionary psychology. We begin with a brief historical review of key theories in psychology and evolutionary biology. We then proceed to substantive topics, including problems of survival, long-term mating, sexuality, parenting, kinship, cooperation, aggression and warfare, conflict between the sexes, status, prestige, and dominance hierarchies. The course concludes by proposing a unified field that integrates the different branches of psychology.

PSY 334E • Evolutionary Psychology

43740 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.126
show description

Course Description. This course will examine the mechanisms of the human mind through the

lens of evolutionary psychology. We begin with a brief historical review of key theories in

psychology and evolutionary biology. We then proceed to substantive topics, including problems

of survival, short-term and long-term mating, sexuality, parenting, kinship, cooperation,

aggression and warfare, conflict between the sexes, status, prestige, and dominance hierarchies.

The course concludes by proposing a unified field that integrates the different branches of

psychology

PSY 334E • Evolutionary Psychology

43120 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.126
show description

Prerequisites

PREREQUISITE: FOR PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS, PSY 301 AND 418 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C IN EACH; FOR NONMAJORS, PSY 301 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C, AND 1 OF THE FOLLOWING WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.

Course Description

Fundamentals of evolutionary psychology, including the theories of natural and sexual selection. Contents cover problems of survival, long-term mating strategies, short-term sexual strategies, parenting, kinship, cooperative alliances, aggression and warfare, conflict between the sexes, and prestige, status, and social dominance.

Grading Policy

Grading will be based on 4 exams, worth 25% each. The exams will consist of 45 multiple choice questions worth 2 points each and 2 short answer questions worth 5 points each. Each exam will cover approximately one fourth of the material in the course. There is no final exam.

Texts

Buss, D.M. (2008). Evolutionary psychology: The new science of the mind, 3rd Edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Dawkins, R. (1989). The selfish gene. New York: Oxford.

PSY 394T • Evolutionary Psychology

43355 • Fall 2010
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 5.106
show description

Seminars in Evolutionary Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 334D • Psychology Of Human Mating

43880 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.126
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Psychology of Human Mating (Psy. 334D)
Professor David M. Buss
Spring, 2010

Course Description.  This course explores the psychology of human mating.  It starts with the initial desires that men and women express when selecting mates and moves to the tactics they use to attract mates, retain mates, and get rid of mates.  The course covers short-term mating (e.g., casual sex) and long-term mating (e.g., marriage).  After outlining essential background in evolutionary biology and the strategies of human mating, we examine the ways in which these strategies give rise to same-sex conflict and conflict between men and women.  We will explore the dark side of mating, including stalking, rape, and mate-related murder.  The course covers mating across cultures, mating across the lifespan, and mating in the context of human evolutionary history.  Evolutionary psychology and sexual selection theory will be used as the overarching theoretical frameworks for the course. 

Course Webpage: http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/class/Psy334D/Buss/index.html

Readings:
Buss, D.M. (2003).  The evolution of desire:  Strategies of human mating (Revised Edition). New York:  Basic Books. [required] [EoD]

Symons, D. (1979).  The evolution of human sexuality.  New York:  Oxford University Press. [Required][EHS]

Meston, C., & Buss, D.M. (2009).  Why women have sex.  New York:  Holt. [required][WWHS]

Blackboard Readings: original articles on mating [required] [BB]

Exams.  There will 4 exams, each counting 25% of the grade. Exams consist of short-answer and multiple choice questions.

25%    Exam #1 – Feb. 11
25%    Exam #2 – March 9
25%    Exam #3 – April 13
25%    Exam #4 – May 6

Teaching Staff
Cari Goetz, Teaching Assistant: cdgoetz@mail.utexas.edu, 3.324A Seay Building;
Office hours:  Monday and Wednesday, 2:30 – 4:00.  Phone: 512-471-0111.  Please direct all grading and exam-related questions to Cari Goetz.

Prof. David M. Buss, 3.228 Seay Building; Office Hours:  T, TH: 4:45 – 5:45pm;
Ph: 475-8489; Email: dbuss@psy.utexas.edu
 
Psychology of Human Mating

Dates            Topic                Readings

Jan. 19        Introduction            EoD: chap. 1; WWHS: Introduction
               
Jan. 21, 26        Evolution & Selection    BB #1, 2; EHS: 1, 2       

Jan. 28, Feb. 2    Women's LT Desires    EoD: 2; EHS: pp. 96-127
                           
Feb. 4, 9        Men's LT Desires        EoD: 3; EHS: Chap. 6

Feb. 11        Exam #1            No Readings

Feb. 16, 18        Casual Sex            EoD: 4; EHS: Chap. 7; WWHS 7, 8

Feb. 23        Female Orgasm        EoD: 221-240; EHS: Chap. 3; WWHS 2

Feb.25            Rhythms of Ovulation     EoD: 240-249; EHS: 127-141

March 2, 4        Attracting a Partner        EoD: 5; EHS: Chap. 5; WWHS: 4

March 9        Exam #2            No Readings

March 11        Sexual Attractiveness    WWHS: chap. 1

March 16, 18 --  Spring Break:  No Classes or Readings

March 23        Mate Retention        EoD: 6; WWHS: 5; BB #3

March 25        Mate Stalking        BB #4

March 30        Mating and Murder        BB #5

April 1, 6        Conflict Between Sexes    EoD: 7; WWHS; chap 10

April 8        Rape                EoD: 270-285; EHS: 8; BB 6, 7

April 13        Exam #3            No Readings

April 15, 20        Breaking Up            EoD: 8; BB #8, 9   

April 22        Lifespan Mating        EoD: 9; BB #10

April 27        Mysteries of Mating        EoD: 12; BB #11, 12   

April 29        Love & Mating Harmony    EoD: 10; BB #13; WWHS 3

May 4            Mating Intelligence        BB #14; WWHS: 11

May 6            Exam #4            No Readings


Psychology of Human Mating
Psychology 334D
Professor David M. Buss
Drop Policy:

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites: PSY 301 with a C or better; PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better; and upper-division standing (60 hours completed).

Disabilities Statement:

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

Blackboard Readings

#1    Buss, D.M., Haselton, M.G., Shackelford, T.K., Bleske, A., & Wakefield, J.C. (1998). Adaptations, exaptations, and spandrels.  American Psychologist, 53, 533-548.

#2    Barker, L. (2006). Teaching evolutionary psychology: An interview with David M. Buss.  Teaching of Psychology, 33, 69-76.

#3     Buss, D.M. (2002). Human mate guarding.  Neuroendocrinology Letters, 23, 23-29.

#4        Spitzberg, B.H., & Cupach, W.R. (2003).  What mad pursuit?  Obsessive relational intrusion and stalking related phenomena. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 8, 345-375. [plus read www.stalkinghelp.org web site]

#5    Duntley, J.D., & Buss, D.M. (2004). The evolution of evil.  In A. Miller (Ed.), The social psychology of good and evil.  New York:  Guilford.

#6    Thornhill, R., & Palmer, C. (2000).  Why men rape.  The Sciences.

#7    Archer, J., & Vaughn, A.E. (2001).  Evolutionary theories of rape.  Psychology, Evolution, and Gender, 3, 95-101.

#8    Betzig, L. (1989). Causes of conjugal dissolution. Current Anthropology, 30, 654-676.

#9     South, S.J., Trent, K., & Shen, Y. (2001).  Changing partners:  Toward a macrostructural-opportunity theory of marital dissolution.  Journal of Marriage and the Family, 63, 743-754.
#10    Treas, J., & Giesen, D. (2000). Sexual infidelity among married and cohabiting Americans.  Journal of Marriage and the Family, 62, 48-60.

#11    Muscarella, F. et al., (2001). Homosexual orientation in males.  Neuroendocrinology Letters, 22, 393-400.

#12    Singh, D., Vidaurri, M., Zambarano, R. J. & Dabbs, J. M. (1999). Lesbian Erotic Role Identification: Behavioral, Morphological, and Hormonal Correlates. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 76, 1035-1049.

#13    Buss, D.M. (2006). The evolution of love. In R.J. Sternberg & Karin Weis (Eds.), The new psychology of love (pp.65 – 86).  New Haven, CT:  Yale University Press.

#14    Buss, D.M. (2007). The future of mating intelligence. In G. Geher & G. Miller (Eds.), Mating intelligence.  Mahwah, NJ:  Erlbaum.

PSY 334E • Evolutionary Psychology

44085 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.126
show description

Evolutionary Psychology - PSY 334e - Fall 2009
Unique Number: 44085
Professor David M. Buss

Course Description.  This course will examine the mechanisms of the human mind through the lens of evolutionary psychology.  We begin with a brief historical review of key theories in psychology and evolutionary biology.  We then proceed to substantive topics, including problems of survival, long-term mating, sexuality, parenting, kinship, cooperation, aggression and warfare, conflict between the sexes, status, prestige, and dominance hierarchies.  The course concludes by proposing a unified field that integrates the different branches of psychology.

Required Readings for Course:
Buss, D.M. (2008).  Evolutionary psychology: The new science of the mind,
Third Edition.  Boston:  Allyn & Bacon. [EP]
Dawkins, R. (1989, or 2006).  The selfish gene.  New York:  Oxford University Press. [SG]

Course Website: http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/class/Psy334e/

Grading & Exams:  Grading will be based on 4 exams, worth 25% each.  The exams will consist of 45 multiple choice questions worth 2 points each and 2 short answer questions worth 5 points each. Each exam will cover approximately one fourth of the material in the course.  There is no final exam. Make-up exams will not be given unless arranged ahead of time with the T.A. in the case of documented emergencies or illnesses. The make-up exam will consist of five essay questions, worth 20 points apiece.  You may go over your exam with the course T.A. anytime during the period only before the next exam is given.

Summary of Requirements:
Exam #1    Sept. 17    25%
Exam #2    Oct. 13        25%
Exam #3    Nov. 5        25%
Exam #4    Dec. 3        25%

Teaching Staff:
David M. Buss, Professor:  Seay 3.228; Office Hours:  T, Th. 4:45 - 5:45;
    Email:  dbuss@psy.utexas.edu
David Lewis, Teaching Assistant:  Seay 3.324E; Office Hours: TTh 2:00-3:30 or by appointment; Email: david.lewis@mail.utexas.edu

 
Evolutionary Psychology
Professor David M. Buss

Dates            Topic                    Readings
Aug. 27, Sept. 1    Introduction                EP: Chapter 1; SG: 1, 2
Sept. 3, 8        Psychological Foundations         EP: Chapter 2; SG: 3
Sept. 10, 15        The Hostile Forces of Nature    EP: Chapter 3; SG: 4
Sept. 17        Exam #1                No Readings        

Sept. 22, 24        Women’s LT Mating Strategies    EP: Chap. 4
Sept. 29        Men’s LT Mating Strategies    EP: Chapter 5        
Oct. 1,6        Short-Term Sexual Strategies    EP: Chap 6
Oct. 8            Problems of Parenting        EP: Chapter 7; SG: 7, 8
Oct. 13        Exam #2                No Readings

Oct. 15, 20        Problems of Kinship            EP: Chapter 8; SG: 6
Oct. 22, 27        Cooperation                EP: Chapter 9; SG: 10, 12
Oct. 29, Nov. 3    Aggression and Warfare        EP: Chapter 10; SG: 5
Nov. 5            Exam #3                No Readings

Nov. 10, 12        Conflict Between the Sexes    EP: Chapter 11; SG: 9
Nov. 17, 19        Status, Prestige, Dominance    EP: Chapter 12; BB reading
Nov. 24        Unified Psychology            EP: Ch. 13    
Nov. 26        Thanksgiving – No Classes        
Dec. 1            Unified Psychology            SG: Ch. 11, 13    
Dec. 3            Exam #4                No Readings

Prerequisites
The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:
(a) PSY 301 with a C or better
(b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better
(c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed)

Note
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

PSY 394T • Evolutionary Psychology

44325 • Fall 2009
Meets W 200pm-500pm SEA 2.224
show description

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.Seminars in Evolutionary Psychology. Three lecture hours a week

PSY 334D • Psychology Of Human Mating

43130 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.126
show description

Mate selection, sources of conflict, and mating over the life span, studied in the context of evolutionary psychology and sexual selection theory. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-divison standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

 

Books

Evolutionary Psychology: The New Science of the Mind

Why Women Have Sex

Why Women Have Sex

 

Cindy Meston, David M. Buss

Why Women Have Sex
December 2010
St. Martin's Press

 

The Murderer Next Door

The Murderer Next Door

 

David M. Buss

The Murderer Next Door
May 2005
Penguin Press HC

 

The Evolution of Desire

The Evolution of Desire

 

David M. Buss

The Evolution of Desire
July 2003
Basic Books

 

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